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Skeleton of 3,000-year-old whale found west of Bangkok


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Skeleton of 3,000-year-old whale found west of Bangkok

By The Nation

 

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Natural Resources and Environment Minister Varawut Silpa-Archa (in black cap) is updated on progress at the site of the whale skeleton excavation.

 

The skeleton of a whale thought to have swum the seas more than 3,000 years ago has been discovered in Samut Sakhon, just west of Bangkok. Varawut Silpa-archa, Natural Resources and Environment minister, has visited the site of the discovery in Amphaeng, Ban Phaeo district, where the whale bones were excavated on November 6.

 

Archaeologists say the partially fossilised remains are 3,000-5,000 years old and resemble the Bryde’s whale, which still swims in Thai seas. The bones will now be carbon-dated to find their precise age.

 

The skeleton stretches about 12 metres, with a skull that measures 3 metres, 19 complete vertebrae, five ribs each, a shoulder blade, and left fins. Archaeologists estimate another 20 per cent of the skeleton is still to be excavated.

 

The remains were found about 12 kilometres inland from the current coastline, providing important evidence of how sea levels have changed over thousands of years. The bones will also aid research on the evolution of whales and the biodiversity of marine life from ancient to modern times.

 

Nowadays, the upper Gulf of Thailand of Samut Sakhon’s coast is home to about 50 Bryde's whales, along with Irrawaddy dolphins, Humpback dolphins, albino dolphins and the finless porpoise.

 

“The seas around Thailand have been abundant with life for thousands of years, as shown by fossils,” said Varawut.

 

He added that it was the duty of the current generation of Thais to preserve the ancient balance and sustainability of this richly fertile marine environment, he added.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30398565?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-11-25
 
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11 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

The remains were found about 12 kilometres inland from the current coastline, providing important evidence of how sea levels have changed over thousands of years.

food for Greta that one is.

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16 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

The remains were found about 12 kilometres inland from the current coastline, providing important evidence of how sea levels have changed over thousands of years.

Past global warming...🤔

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If this whale was swimming so far "inland" then it proves that the seas have fallen. 

All this complete rubbish about rising seas spouted by people who could not point to the Pacific Ocean when shown a map of the world. Let alone the Bay of Siam.

 

I always tell everyone about Mr Celcius the Swedish guy who chipped a mark on a cliff to measure the highest tide height in the 1730's. He used a boat to get there. Today you have to walk across a farmers field of grass and take a 12 foot ladder to sea the mark. Why?  Because since the ice age all of Northern Europe is rising after 2 to 4 miles depth of solid ice melted. Southern Europe is falling by the same amount and being crushed northward by Africa heading North. Hence earthquakes in Italy, Greece and Turkey. Real facts.

Utter nonsense pumped out by climate idiots is now the new norm.

 

However, who knows if the locals living in the area 3,000 years ago dragged a dead whale up from the beach and had a massive Barbeque.....

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Seems the oceans and continents are shifting even now!

Some of the biggest catfish and sea snakes to ever exist lived in what is today the Sahara desert, according to a new paper that contains the first reconstructions of extinct aquatic species from the ancient Trans-Saharan Seaway. Article

..and of course the Continental drift

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On 11/25/2020 at 8:38 PM, snoop1130 said:

Skeleton of 3,000-year-old whale found west of Bangkok

Perhaps, to clarify, the headline should read "3000-year-old skeleton of a whale found west of Bangkok"   I strongly disbelieve a whale lived for 3000 years.  Methuselah only lived for 969 years.

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