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Sweden's pandemic experiment ends amid spiking coronavirus cases


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Infection rate is not, IMO, the critical factor, but the seriously ill and death rate is. if 90% only had mild symptoms or none, it's not critical, IMO. If the death rate is below US, Britain, Fr

At least they were free for longer than in other countries.   Seems that lockdowns don't work either, as it didn't stop all those other countries getting second wave.

Everyone who is going to get Covid is going to get covid sooner or later. They will all become 'cases', very few will die. Remember that this was supposed to be about not overloading the health servic

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15 minutes ago, cooked said:

Everyone who is going to get Covid is going to get covid sooner or later. They will all become 'cases', very few will die. Remember that this was supposed to be about not overloading the health services? I believe that all the emergency hospitals that were built or shipped in initially (UK, USA, China and Russia off hand) have been removed. 

Meanwhile, for some mysterious reason, deaths from 'flu complications have virtually disappeared. 

 

 

34 minutes ago, thaibeachlovers said:

Infection rate is not, IMO, the critical factor, but the seriously ill and death rate is. if 90% only had mild symptoms or none, it's not critical, IMO.

If the death rate is below US, Britain, France, Germany they are doing well, IMO.

 

COVID-19 hospitalizations soar in lockdown-free Sweden amid second wave

Coronavirus hospitalizations are surging in lockdown-eschewing Sweden as the country grapples with a second wave of the virus, data shows.

There are currently 1,004 patients being treated for the virus in the Nordic nation’s hospitals — up 60 percent from the previous week’s 627, the Guardian reported.

“We consider the situation extremely serious,” Björn Eriksson, the director of healthcare for the Stockholm region, told state media.

COVID-19 hospitalizations surging in Sweden amid second wave (nypost.com)

 

 

As for the lower incidence of flu...

Decreased Influenza Activity During the COVID-19 Pandemic — United States, Australia, Chile, and South Africa, 2020

After recognition of widespread community transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), by mid- to late February 2020, indicators of influenza activity began to decline in the Northern Hemisphere. These changes were attributed to both artifactual changes related to declines in routine health seeking for respiratory illness as well as real changes in influenza virus circulation because of widespread implementation of measures to mitigate transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Data from clinical laboratories in the United States indicated a 61% decrease in the number of specimens submitted (from a median of 49,696 per week during September 29, 2019–February 29, 2020, to 19,537 during March 1–May 16, 2020) and a 98% decrease in influenza activity as measured by percentage of submitted specimens testing positive (from a median of 19.34% to 0.33%).

Decreased Influenza Activity During the COVID-19 Pandemic — United States, Australia, Chile, and South Africa, 2020 | MMWR (cdc.gov)

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2 minutes ago, rabas said:

Flu itself is way down worldwide. Lockdowns, masks, distancing, hand washing, home schooling, general caution, zinc!  Now, if all that caution greatly reduced the flu, just imagine what would happen with highly infectious COVID-19 without it? 

 

From WHO

  • Globally, despite continued or even increased testing for influenza in some countries, influenza activity remained at lower levels than expected for this time of the year.
  • Worldwide, of the very low numbers of detections reported, seasonal influenza A(H3N2) viruses accounted for the majority of detections.

 

I think lower flu incidence is also related to 'viral interference'.  This is the basic idea that one dominant virus crowds out others. Viruses have to compete with each other for the spoils just as athletes do.  Yes, you are also right about social distancing, etc.  In successfully dealing with one virus we may also receive a general immunity boost as well.  As you say, we are all looking after ourselves better.  I've had far fewer infections this year, because I haven't been mixing so much. Maybe we'll all learn a lesson from this pandemic-  I mean I for one have had a few truly rotten respiratory infections in my life.  Some people really don't appreciate that even the common cold is a definite disease event, leading them to be cavalier about their own and other peoples' health.

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2 hours ago, mtls2005 said:

Does Sweden report any figures?

 

In the usual places I see a bunch of blanks, with most figures remaining constant for a week or so.

 

Found some news articles...

 

 

 

Lockdown finally looms for Sweden as it suffers more than DOUBLE the number of Covid cases per capita than Britain, Germany or Spain


Sweden's infection rate is higher than in Britain, France, Spain, Italy or Germany
Average daily deaths are once again above those in Denmark, Norway or Finland 

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9025989/Swedens-Covid-infection-rate-soars-Britain-Germany-Spain.html

 

 

 

   Any involvement with China would only be coincidental.  

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5 hours ago, johng said:

Just a thought but isn't it winter in Sweden now ?  isn't that normally the time when hospitals are stretched to their limits ?

 Plenty of ordinary flues,  car accidents, broken bones, etc. And now also broken dreams. 

 

Many thanks to China. Something doesn't add up here IMO.

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3 hours ago, mommysboy said:

 

I think lower flu incidence is also related to 'viral interference'.  This is the basic idea that one dominant virus crowds out others. Viruses have to compete with each other for the spoils just as athletes do.  Yes, you are also right about social distancing, etc.  In successfully dealing with one virus we may also receive a general immunity boost as well.  As you say, we are all looking after ourselves better.  I've had far fewer infections this year, because I haven't been mixing so much. Maybe we'll all learn a lesson from this pandemic-  I mean I for one have had a few truly rotten respiratory infections in my life.  Some people really don't appreciate that even the common cold is a definite disease event, leading them to be cavalier about their own and other peoples' health.

 


    Nature fights back? The environment can recover, which is ironically great. 

 

All the endangered and extinct animals, including everything we have done to the environment, are now fighting back.  

 

All the stinky planes and trains, the bushfires, the use of too much plastic, power plants instead of solar energy,  now slowed down, can only be good. 

 

We are destroying many rainforests to have cheap gasoline where millions of other living things get killed, and water is so polluted that it's also affecting the ground and drink water. 


Something similar had to happen for some greedy freaks to wake up to realize that you can't eat money. 

 

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, placeholder said:

There are currently 1,004 patients being treated for the virus in the Nordic nation’s hospitals — up 60 percent from the previous week’s 627, the Guardian reported.

 

1,000 Covid hospitalizations really isn't that bad. If scaled up, it would be the equivalent of 30K in the US and they are having 100K+ hospitalizations at the moment.

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18 hours ago, johng said:

Just a thought but isn't it winter in Sweden now ?  isn't that normally the time when hospitals are stretched to their limits ?

Why would you think that Sweden, given its advanced health care system, would regularly jeopardize its citizens by having barely enough capacity to cope with the usually predictable rise in illness?

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12 hours ago, ExpatOilWorker said:

 

1,000 Covid hospitalizations really isn't that bad. If scaled up, it would be the equivalent of 30K in the US and they are having 100K+ hospitalizations at the moment.

True. But that article was dated Nov 12. I couldn't one with more recent numbers. 

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