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Who Lives in Buriram?


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7 hours ago, bermondburi said:

I think that's the point. 

But not the point you were trying to make.

 

You posted such phrases as " far better places", "don't care about education" and used "limited funds" as an excuse whilst speaking about Issan and the standard of education.

 

What was your point? From your wording it would seem you were, in your opinion, pointing out that the education offered in Issan was not good. However, you then agreed that Buriram, a part of Issan, was as good a place as any.🤔

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I spent my last 3 years in Buriram. It wasn't my original plan but I'm stuck here due to some private matters. I can tell you that it is dead boring, hardly anyone speak English, the province is not b

Yes, bar girls, dear me, it's a good job that here in Pattaya we all marry Thai investment bankers and astrophysicists, lol.

My relationship with Buriram goes back about 15 years as my wife is from there. Go there regularly although not so much the last few years.    Important to differentiate between the town and

3 hours ago, youreavinalaff said:

But not the point you were trying to make.

 

You posted such phrases as " far better places", "don't care about education" and used "limited funds" as an excuse whilst speaking about Issan and the standard of education.

 

What was your point? From your wording it would seem you were, in your opinion, pointing out that the education offered in Issan was not good. However, you then agreed that Buriram, a part of Issan, was as good a place as any.🤔

Do I really have to spell it out for you? 

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On 12/18/2020 at 2:38 PM, Maha Sarakham said:

This is the kind of comparison that is helpful to me personally, as I too enjoy the natural beauty and outdoors.  I have been to multiple Isaan provinces, but never Buriram, sounds similar.

Yes sorry, I concentrated on nightlife as if that's all that's important - there has to be more than that for me too.  I do like a good night out but I also like great scenery with things to do connected to that.

 

I would agree with bermondburi, its just flat and boring but the same thing goes for most of Isaan. With a few execeptions, once you get past the Lamtakhong Dam there's very little in the way of scenery until you get to the far North East of Isaan.  Its great for growing rice and that's about it.

 

But I'm biased - I live very close to a national park with rolling hills in the UK and my home in Thailand is very much the same.  I don't mind a night out in Pattaya or Bangkok but I'd rather see them both in my rear view mirror - I didn't settle on Thailand to waste my life away in beer bars.  My ex came from Buriram and personally I couldn't stay there much more than a couple of nights but I'd sit out on my balcony at Khao Yai every evening if I had to (happily not with her now 😀).

 

I'm a biker and I can ride through beautiful scenery on reasonably decent roads for hours around my home area.  I can't think of anything worse than riding around Buriram with its endless miles of dusty flatness.

 

Things are improving, the main road is now dual carriageway right past Prakhon Chai and Buriram city is slowly modernising but they can't change the scenery or the terain.

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8 minutes ago, KhaoYai said:

Things are improving, the main road is now dual carriageway right past Prakhon Chai and Buriram city is slowly modernizing but they can't change the scenery or the terrain.

 

That is very good to keep in mind.  Can always build a beautiful house in a rapidly developing town but if the surrounding terrain isn't that great to look at, what's the point...

 

I'm definitely a huge fan of the look of places like Khao Sok and the tropical lushness of some of the Southern provinces.

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1 hour ago, Maha Sarakham said:

 

That is very good to keep in mind.  Can always build a beautiful house in a rapidly developing town but if the surrounding terrain isn't that great to look at, what's the point...

 

I'm definitely a huge fan of the look of places like Khao Sok and the tropical lushness of some of the Southern provinces.

Khao Sok.... Now you're talking. 

 

One of my favourite drives is driving through there between Lang Suan and Ranong. 

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1 hour ago, youreavinalaff said:

If you could, yes please.

 

Currently you are not making any sense.

 

Thanks.

Right then, here goes. 

 

Yes, the education offered in Buriram is not of a high standard. Just as the education offered in government schools throughout Thailand is not of a high standard. 

 

I guess a lot of it comes down to what kind of future you see for your children, and where you see that future being, and English language, and exam certification is going to play a big part in that decision. 

 

I'll deal with the English language part first. There may be schools in Buriram with some kind of EP. I suspect, but I'm not certain so maybe you or someone else can provide better information here, that the EP would be limited to English language only. In other words there wouldn't be any other subjects taught in English, but only English language itself. Often these programs just guarantee more contact time per week with the ferrang, smaller class sizes, aircon room etc. A good money maker for the school. Face for the director and the parents who can afford to pay the extra. 

 

The closest entry level bilingual school I can think of would be Sarasas Witaed Nakhon Ratchasima. Somewhere like that, all subjects except Thai pretty much would be taught in both English and Thai. And bearing in mind this is entry level I don't believe Buriram to have anything like this. Why is this entry level? 🤔🤔

 

A few reasons. Firstly, class size may be up to 40 in a class, very similar to a Thai government school. Obviously the more in a class, the less teacher student contact time, and harder to maintain discipline etc. Classes have no aircon! No more needs to be said about that I think. And you have to ask yourself how qualified the teacher in the classroom is. Too often in Thailand it's about style over substance. A white face in the classroom to please the parents, so they can say that their pride and joy is taught by the guy from Manchester or Miami. It doesn't really matter what qualifications if any they have. Plenty of teachers working without proper qualifications in Thailand, and very easy in the backwaters to get away with it. 

 

So you have to ask questions about who the teacher is in that school in the EP in Buriram. 

 

Bearing in mind that a bilingual school like the one in Korat described above is only going to be doing O-net and A-net examinations, this leads me onto exam certification.

 

At some point as a parent you have to make a decision about what kind of future you want for your children. Personally I see my children going to university in the UK. For this they're going to need transferable qualifications if going later in childhood. They will need IGCSE if going to do A-level in the UK normally, or at least having the English ability to be able to keep up. Same applies if going to do GCSE in the UK, or at an earlier age. Do you see why it's important to be doing other subjects in English now. It's because you need that subject specific vocabulary to help you. 

 

There is no way that any school in Buriram can provide this. If you see your child going to university in Thailand and having a life in Thailand, fine, doesn't matter in the slightest. A Thai education in Buriram will be perfect for a Thai University, but I think we can both agree that the standards are lower. Many foreigners like to make the argument that their child is fluent in English etc, but quite often they may not have great written skills or the child may be lacking a lot of subject specific vocabulary. Of course, there are exceptions. But that school in Buriram is going to limit the child's options in the future. 

 

You may disagree, but a lot of this does come down to money at the end of the day. Even that school in Khorat is going to set you back about 80k a year, and that's just for bilingual. A proper English program with 80% English will be double that at least. A full international where all teachers have QTS, double that again if not triple or quadruple that! I spent enough time in Isaan to know that this is beyond a lot of retirees means. Not their fault, it is what it is and I totally understand, but it still doesn't make the school in Buriram as good. 

 

Like I said, if the child stays in Thailand then none of this matters, and a bright child will do well anywhere. But only think how well a child that reaches their full potential might do. 

 

But if you're happy with everything in Buriram, do what you think is best, as the Thais say, it's up to you! 

 

Enjoy your day buddy... 😘

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1 hour ago, bermondburi said:

Right then, here goes. 

 

Yes, the education offered in Buriram is not of a high standard. Just as the education offered in government schools throughout Thailand is not of a high standard. 

 

I guess a lot of it comes down to what kind of future you see for your children, and where you see that future being, and English language, and exam certification is going to play a big part in that decision. 

 

I'll deal with the English language part first. There may be schools in Buriram with some kind of EP. I suspect, but I'm not certain so maybe you or someone else can provide better information here, that the EP would be limited to English language only. In other words there wouldn't be any other subjects taught in English, but only English language itself. Often these programs just guarantee more contact time per week with the ferrang, smaller class sizes, aircon room etc. A good money maker for the school. Face for the director and the parents who can afford to pay the extra. 

 

The closest entry level bilingual school I can think of would be Sarasas Witaed Nakhon Ratchasima. Somewhere like that, all subjects except Thai pretty much would be taught in both English and Thai. And bearing in mind this is entry level I don't believe Buriram to have anything like this. Why is this entry level? 🤔🤔

 

A few reasons. Firstly, class size may be up to 40 in a class, very similar to a Thai government school. Obviously the more in a class, the less teacher student contact time, and harder to maintain discipline etc. Classes have no aircon! No more needs to be said about that I think. And you have to ask yourself how qualified the teacher in the classroom is. Too often in Thailand it's about style over substance. A white face in the classroom to please the parents, so they can say that their pride and joy is taught by the guy from Manchester or Miami. It doesn't really matter what qualifications if any they have. Plenty of teachers working without proper qualifications in Thailand, and very easy in the backwaters to get away with it. 

 

So you have to ask questions about who the teacher is in that school in the EP in Buriram. 

 

Bearing in mind that a bilingual school like the one in Korat described above is only going to be doing O-net and A-net examinations, this leads me onto exam certification.

 

At some point as a parent you have to make a decision about what kind of future you want for your children. Personally I see my children going to university in the UK. For this they're going to need transferable qualifications if going later in childhood. They will need IGCSE if going to do A-level in the UK normally, or at least having the English ability to be able to keep up. Same applies if going to do GCSE in the UK, or at an earlier age. Do you see why it's important to be doing other subjects in English now. It's because you need that subject specific vocabulary to help you. 

 

There is no way that any school in Buriram can provide this. If you see your child going to university in Thailand and having a life in Thailand, fine, doesn't matter in the slightest. A Thai education in Buriram will be perfect for a Thai University, but I think we can both agree that the standards are lower. Many foreigners like to make the argument that their child is fluent in English etc, but quite often they may not have great written skills or the child may be lacking a lot of subject specific vocabulary. Of course, there are exceptions. But that school in Buriram is going to limit the child's options in the future. 

 

You may disagree, but a lot of this does come down to money at the end of the day. Even that school in Khorat is going to set you back about 80k a year, and that's just for bilingual. A proper English program with 80% English will be double that at least. A full international where all teachers have QTS, double that again if not triple or quadruple that! I spent enough time in Isaan to know that this is beyond a lot of retirees means. Not their fault, it is what it is and I totally understand, but it still doesn't make the school in Buriram as good. 

 

Like I said, if the child stays in Thailand then none of this matters, and a bright child will do well anywhere. But only think how well a child that reaches their full potential might do. 

 

But if you're happy with everything in Buriram, do what you think is best, as the Thais say, it's up to you! 

 

Enjoy your day buddy... 😘

Having just read the first 10% of your answer, I see you are talking based on assumptions.

 

Therefore, your answer means nothing as it contains too many errors based on  those assumptions.

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, youreavinalaff said:

Having just read the first 10% of your answer, I see you are talking based on assumptions.

 

Therefore, your answer means nothing as it contains too many errors based on  those assumptions.

 

 

 

 

Of course there are always exceptions, just as there are always exceptional students. You did understand I was talking generally right? 🤔🤔️ 

 

But keep believing whatever makes you feel better. If you think that government schools in Thailand provide a 1st class education, good for you mate. 

 

If you think that 40-50 in a class is a good learning environment good for you. 

 

If you think that old wooden furniture and blackboards provide good education even better. 

 

If you think that no aircon in 40° is ideal, give yourself a gold star and a big pat on the back. 

 

If you think that a system of endemic corruption and greed is in the students' best interest, congratulations. 

 

Ask yourself this? If these schools are so good, why do Thais so actively seek out extra classes, private tuition, language schools, cram schools etc for their children?

 

Keep on dismissing the facts all you like. 😘

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13 hours ago, bermondburi said:

Of course there are always exceptions, just as there are always exceptional students. You did understand I was talking generally right? 🤔🤔️ 

 

But keep believing whatever makes you feel better. If you think that government schools in Thailand provide a 1st class education, good for you mate. 

 

If you think that 40-50 in a class is a good learning environment good for you. 

 

If you think that old wooden furniture and blackboards provide good education even better. 

 

If you think that no aircon in 40° is ideal, give yourself a gold star and a big pat on the back. 

 

If you think that a system of endemic corruption and greed is in the students' best interest, congratulations. 

 

Ask yourself this? If these schools are so good, why do Thais so actively seek out extra classes, private tuition, language schools, cram schools etc for their children?

 

Keep on dismissing the facts all you like. 😘

And then again you can plan in a year of schooling in the UK after secondary school, which is what we will be doing with our grandchild (Covid permitting) in two years time. Further education in Thailand if deemed desirable would follow.

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21 minutes ago, cooked said:

And then again you can plan in a year of schooling in the UK after secondary school, which is what we will be doing with our grandchild (Covid permitting) in two years time. Further education in Thailand if deemed desirable would follow.

Everyone has to do what they think works best for them. Bear in mind that if studying in the UK after secondary in Thailand pre degree level in Thailand that would be A-levels, which are normally 2 years, so that year might turn into 2 for it to be worthwhile. Would probably be a big jump as well from finishing secondary in Thailand to A-level in the UK unless spoken and written English is perfect. It's tough I know. Hope it all works out. 

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17 hours ago, bermondburi said:

Keep on dismissing the facts all you like.

You seem to be getting confused. I have not been dismissing the facts. Only your incorrect assumptions.  

 

I will quote you for ease of reference:

 

"There may be schools in Buriram with some kind of EP. I suspect, but I'm not certain so maybe you or someone else can provide better information here, that the EP would be limited to English language only. In other words there wouldn't be any other subjects taught in English, but only English language itself. Often these programs just guarantee more contact time per week with the ferrang, smaller class sizes, aircon room etc."  Incorrect.

 

The closest entry level bilingual school I can think of would be Sarasas Witaed Nakhon Ratchasima. Incorrect

 

Firstly, class size may be up to 40 in a class, very similar to a Thai government school. Incorrect

 

"Old wooden furniture and blackboards" In your assumed non existant EP. Incorrect.

 

"No aircon in 40°" Incorrect

 

"Plenty of teachers working without proper qualifications in Thailand, and very easy in the backwaters to get away with it." Incorrect. The same qualifications are needed to teach in any OBEC school. They are all covered by the Teachers' Council of Thailand and all schools, whether top 5 in Bangkok or Village school, need to be given the all clear to hire teachers. There is the possibility of teachers working illegally, I agree, but this too is becoming less and less and can also happen at any school in any place. As was recently highlighted in the reports about Sarasas schools in Bangkok and Nonthaburi.

 

"Ask yourself this? If these schools are so good, why do Thais so actively seek out extra classes, private tuition, language schools, cram schools etc for their children?" Happens all over Asia. The culture that "more is good."

 

 

Just a few errors for you to digest. All picked out from my own, first hand, experience. I could have gone further but would have been here all day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by youreavinalaff
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3 hours ago, cooked said:

And then again you can plan in a year of schooling in the UK after secondary school, which is what we will be doing with our grandchild (Covid permitting) in two years time. Further education in Thailand if deemed desirable would follow.

I agree and I have seen it done.

 

Full Thai education, nursey through to K12, then a year of education in UK. Then move on to further education. The only exception is that the examples I have seen have gone on to University in UK.

 

 

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1 hour ago, youreavinalaff said:

You seem to be getting confused. I have not been dismissing the facts. Only your incorrect assumptions.  

 

I will quote you for ease of reference:

 

"There may be schools in Buriram with some kind of EP. I suspect, but I'm not certain so maybe you or someone else can provide better information here, that the EP would be limited to English language only. In other words there wouldn't be any other subjects taught in English, but only English language itself. Often these programs just guarantee more contact time per week with the ferrang, smaller class sizes, aircon room etc."  Incorrect.

 

The closest entry level bilingual school I can think of would be Sarasas Witaed Nakhon Ratchasima. Incorrect

 

Firstly, class size may be up to 40 in a class, very similar to a Thai government school. Incorrect

 

"Old wooden furniture and blackboards" In your assumed non existant EP. Incorrect.

 

"No aircon in 40°" Incorrect

 

"Plenty of teachers working without proper qualifications in Thailand, and very easy in the backwaters to get away with it." Incorrect. The same qualifications are needed to teach in any OBEC school. They are all covered by the Teachers' Council of Thailand and all schools, whether top 5 in Bangkok or Village school, need to be given the all clear to hire teachers. There is the possibility of teachers working illegally, I agree, but this too is becoming less and less and can also happen at any school in any place. As was recently highlighted in the reports about Sarasas schools in Bangkok and Nonthaburi.

 

"Ask yourself this? If these schools are so good, why do Thais so actively seek out extra classes, private tuition, language schools, cram schools etc for their children?" Happens all over Asia. The culture that "more is good."

 

 

Just a few errors for you to digest. All picked out from my own, first hand, experience. I could have gone further but would have been here all day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Okay. So give me some facts. You're very good at telling me how wrong I am. 

 

What schools in Buriram offer EP in multiple subjects? 

 

Where is the closest bilingual school to Buriram? 

 

Wooden furniture and blackboards referred to government schools, as did no a/c. 

 

You really believe that it's not easy for foreign teachers to get a job in a school Thailand? 🤔🤔️ 

 

You say you've got 1st hand experience, so what are these great schools in Buriram? 

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