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NASA is extending Mars and Jupiter missions, citing notable success


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22 hours ago, Thaivisa Web Content Team said:

Europa, the sixth-largest moon in the Solar System, is home to an ocean that "could be habitable,"

Distance from the sun: On average, Europa's distance from the sun is about 485 million miles (or 780 million kilometers).

Distance from Jupiter: Europa is Jupiter's sixth satellite. Its orbital distance from Jupiter is 414,000 miles (670,900 km). It takes Europa three and a half Earth-days to orbit Jupiter. Europa is tidally locked, so the same side faces Jupiter at all times.

Size: Europa is 1,900 miles (3,100 km) in diameter, making it smaller than Earth's moon, but larger than Pluto. It is the smallest of the Galilean moons.

Temperature: Europa's surface temperature at the equator never rises above minus 260 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 160 degrees Celsius). At the poles of the moon, the temperature never rises above minus 370 F (minus 220 C).

Not habitable for me. The "ocean", at those surface temperatures is probably solid ice.

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4 minutes ago, TKDfella said:

The Curiosity Mars Rover has now spent 3000 days on the surface and still going.

I could do with some batteries like that for my solar power.

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9 hours ago, Muhendis said:

Distance from the sun: On average, Europa's distance from the sun is about 485 million miles (or 780 million kilometers).

Distance from Jupiter: Europa is Jupiter's sixth satellite. Its orbital distance from Jupiter is 414,000 miles (670,900 km). It takes Europa three and a half Earth-days to orbit Jupiter. Europa is tidally locked, so the same side faces Jupiter at all times.

Size: Europa is 1,900 miles (3,100 km) in diameter, making it smaller than Earth's moon, but larger than Pluto. It is the smallest of the Galilean moons.

Temperature: Europa's surface temperature at the equator never rises above minus 260 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 160 degrees Celsius). At the poles of the moon, the temperature never rises above minus 370 F (minus 220 C).

Not habitable for me. The "ocean", at those surface temperatures is probably solid ice.

The possibility of supporting life is in the subsurface ocean. 
https://phys.org/news/2020-06-ocean-jupiter-moon-europa-habitable.html

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I'm absolutely opposed to any of these types of activities. We should not be spending our time and resources on things like this until we clean up our own planet. Right now, any efforts to spread the humans to other worlds should not be called "colonizing," it should be called "metastasizing." 😠

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22 hours ago, TKDfella said:

We are living in a fantastic age of scientific discovery. The Curiosity Mars Rover has now spent 3000 days on the surface and still going.

That's just an advanced form of littering, IMO. 😠

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Also Rolls Royce and the UK Space Agency are joining to do research on nuclear powered spacecraft. If successful, would probably halve the duration of such trips to Mars, Jupiter and beyond. Such research, and other forms of propulsion, will keep higher education at the 'cutting edge'.

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1 hour ago, billsmart said:

I'm absolutely opposed to any of these types of activities. We should not be spending our time and resources on things like this until we clean up our own planet. Right now, any efforts to spread the humans to other worlds should not be called "colonizing," it should be called "metastasizing." 😠

Continued..

 

While I have some sympathy with your viewpoint about the human race pursuing the same sort of ecological damage on the Moon and Mars as it has on Earth - and there are plans in place from many countries including China to start trying to mine the moon, there is a way in which this can be of ecological benefit to the earth.

Our use of organics (hydrocarbons for fuel and plastics, coal for fuel etc.) could be drastically reduced in the next 30 years with more investment and government mandates on renewables, but there is still the issue of mineral mining. The mining of metals, whether they are industrial metals like iron and nickel, precious metals like gold and platinum, or rare earths such as Scandium or Yttrium which are used in mobile phones and increasingly sought after as we go into quantum computing, creates massive ecological damage and pollutes the community, as has been the case in Thailand. And it is still getting worse as we dig deeper and farther in the earth's crust.

 

But the Earth is not the only place where these metals are fund, if you imagine the crust of the earth split apart into thousands of pieces, this is the asteroid belt lying in between Mars and Jupiter. 

It is estimated that a single asteroid - 16 Psyche - contains more than $10,000 Quadrillion  (yes Quadrillion) worth of metals - that is more than the supply on Earth mined in 20 years and a value greater than the total of the worlds GDP. And that is only one of thousands of asteroids.

 

At the moment we do not have the technology to go straight to these asteroids, mine them, and safely bring the metals back, but the technologies being developed for colonizing the moon and Mars are essential stepping stones to  this end objective.

While it may be utopian to envisage Earth as a "garden planet" with no fossil fuels used and no mining - at least we are pursuing some concrete programs to eventually get to this point.

 

 

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1 hour ago, crobe said:

Continued..

 

While I have some sympathy with your viewpoint about the human race pursuing the same sort of ecological damage on the Moon and Mars as it has on Earth - and there are plans in place from many countries including China to start trying to mine the moon, there is a way in which this can be of ecological benefit to the earth.

Our use of organics (hydrocarbons for fuel and plastics, coal for fuel etc.) could be drastically reduced in the next 30 years with more investment and government mandates on renewables, but there is still the issue of mineral mining. The mining of metals, whether they are industrial metals like iron and nickel, precious metals like gold and platinum, or rare earths such as Scandium or Yttrium which are used in mobile phones and increasingly sought after as we go into quantum computing, creates massive ecological damage and pollutes the community, as has been the case in Thailand. And it is still getting worse as we dig deeper and farther in the earth's crust.

 

But the Earth is not the only place where these metals are fund, if you imagine the crust of the earth split apart into thousands of pieces, this is the asteroid belt lying in between Mars and Jupiter. 

It is estimated that a single asteroid - 16 Psyche - contains more than $10,000 Quadrillion  (yes Quadrillion) worth of metals - that is more than the supply on Earth mined in 20 years and a value greater than the total of the worlds GDP. And that is only one of thousands of asteroids.

 

At the moment we do not have the technology to go straight to these asteroids, mine them, and safely bring the metals back, but the technologies being developed for colonizing the moon and Mars are essential stepping stones to  this end objective.

While it may be utopian to envisage Earth as a "garden planet" with no fossil fuels used and no mining - at least we are pursuing some concrete programs to eventually get to this point.

 

 

Excellent commentary if I may say in relation to both your posts.

There are many benefits for us existing earth dwellers that have arisen from the space exploration, I seem to think that silicon and teflon are a couple that spring to mind.

Thank goodness we are not all luddites.

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13 hours ago, billsmart said:

I'm absolutely opposed to any of these types of activities. We should not be spending our time and resources on things like this until we clean up our own planet. Right now, any efforts to spread the humans to other worlds should not be called "colonizing," it should be called "metastasizing." 😠

When we would have said that when we started to experiment with electricity, we were still in the Steam Age.

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On 1/14/2021 at 7:57 AM, billsmart said:

I'm absolutely opposed to any of these types of activities. We should not be spending our time and resources on things like this until we clean up our own planet. Right now, any efforts to spread the humans to other worlds should not be called "colonizing," it should be called "metastasizing." 😠

Scientists are people with a wide range of interests which in turn come from people with the same. Some people are just not interested or motivated in some topics while others are. One cannot simply divert expertise from say, someone interested in 'what's up there' to pollution control etc. The mind doesn't work that way. Or say for example, a mathematician might be great in supplying the equations for modelling this or that but put a microscope or telescope in their hand and they might get bored. While we have the diversity of thought and expertise, we should use it.

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4 hours ago, TKDfella said:

Scientists are people with a wide range of interests which in turn come from people with the same. Some people are just not interested or motivated in some topics while others are. One cannot simply divert expertise from say, someone interested in 'what's up there' to pollution control etc. The mind doesn't work that way. Or say for example, a mathematician might be great in supplying the equations for modelling this or that but put a microscope or telescope in their hand and they might get bored. While we have the diversity of thought and expertise, we should use it.

We are using our intellect, and that is what is resulting in the destruction of this planet. 

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