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Water Filter - Drinking Only


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Looking for advice on buying a filter just for drinking water.

Have always had it delivered previously, but want to use the scheme water in my current house. 

Not looking to treat large volumes  of water from a tank as others are seeking, just want to purify drinking water with a continuous supply from one tap.

I don't want a jug with a built in filter, but something with more volume than that.

The scheme water seems clean, and is obviously treated at the plant, but locals don't drink it because of the usual added chemicals. They prefer instead to filter ground water. 

What's a good system for the purpose in your experience? Brand, size, supplier, ease of instillation, price,  filter replacements?

Thankyou.

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Yes, 5 filters total, the 3 main ones I change about every 3 months, the other 2, about every 6 months.    Not more than a few hundred baht for a set of 5.    Better you do it yoursel

I just boil water, easier and kills everything. Filters do NOT remove added soluble chemicals, unless the filter is activated carbon. Reverse osmosis does not remove smaller elements such as fluoride

https://www.livestrong.com/article/527125-does-reverse-osmosis-remove-fluoride/

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Had one of these for a couple of years. Connects to the tap and allows flow to either the filter or to the sink. 2  of us in the house using it for drinking water and only just needing a new cartridge.

 

HomePro.

Screenshot 2021-01-13 at 19.08.06.png

Edited by DaLa
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I’ve been drinking both city water and well water in Isaan through a small 50gpd (I believe) reverse osmosis filter mounted on my kitchen top for years now and never had an issue. I just refill 1.5L water bottles and smash them in the fridge. 
 

They can be purchased all over lazada for 3,000-4,000 baht. Just get one with an included UV light. 
 

Same system used on ships to desalinate sea water for showers and consumption. 

 

That’s the only option for drinking water and no questions. 
 

Something like this 

 

https://s.lazada.co.th/s.2hNSC

Edited by Mama Noodle
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27 minutes ago, DaLa said:

Had one of these for a couple of years. Connects to the tap and allows flow to either the filter or to the sink. 2  of us in the house using it for drinking water and only just needing a new cartridge.

 

HomePro.

Screenshot 2021-01-13 at 19.08.06.png

Thanks for that.  We have a number of people using our drinking water (currently getting big bottles from a relatives place) this might not produce enough. It does seem expensive for what it is.

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29 minutes ago, Mama Noodle said:

I’ve been drinking both city water and well water in Isaan through a small 50gph (I believe) reverse osmosis filter mounted on my kitchen top for years now and never had an issue. I just refill 1.5L water bottles and smash them in the fridge. 
 

They can be purchased all over lazada for 3,000-4,000 baht. Just get one with an included UV light. 
 

Same system used on ships to desalinate sea water for showers and consumption. 

 

That’s the only option for drinking water and no questions. 
 

Something like this 

 

https://s.lazada.co.th/s.2hNSC

Thanks, have been looking at similar from Lazada, but a little confused by choice and concerned at performance.

Your feedback appreciated.

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2 minutes ago, Old Croc said:

Thanks, have been looking at similar from Lazada, but a little confused by choice and concerned at performance.

Your feedback appreciated.


Any 50gpd (gallon per day) unit with UV light and decent ratings will be fine. 

 

Keep in mind that the 50gpd rating is literal. The pressure tank is like 3-4 liters, and once depleted, will take an hour or so to “recharge”. In other words it’ll take 24 hours to produce 50 gallons. I only consume 5-6 liters a day so it’s perfect for a household. 
 

Also you need a decent house water pressure for it to operate well at that rating. 32 psi supply and above. Any house pressure pump will do, but shoddy city supply and I’m not sure. 
 

But if you tick all those boxes, it’s the safest bet. 

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15 minutes ago, Mama Noodle said:

I’ve been drinking both city water and well water in Isaan through a small 50gpd (I believe) reverse osmosis filter mounted on my kitchen top for years now and never had an issue. I just refill 1.5L water bottles and smash them in the fridge. 
 

They can be purchased all over lazada for 3,000-4,000 baht. Just get one with an included UV light. 
 

Same system used on ships to desalinate sea water for showers and consumption. 

 

That’s the only option for drinking water and no questions. 
 

Something like this 

 

https://s.lazada.co.th/s.2hNSC

Are there any filters that has to be changed?

How often (approximately)?

Cost of replacement filters?

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22 minutes ago, ravip said:

Are there any filters that has to be changed?

How often (approximately)?

Cost of replacement filters?


Yes, 5 filters total, the 3 main ones I change about every 3 months, the other 2, about every 6 months. 

 

Not more than a few hundred baht for a set of 5. 
 

Better you do it yourself and know they are clean, or rely on the water people to do it. Either way you’re buying RO water. 
 

Most bottled water nowadays is reverse osmosis. 
 

I generally don’t touch the filters until I notice the “recharge” rate decrease. 

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I just boil water, easier and kills everything. Filters do NOT remove added soluble chemicals, unless the filter is activated carbon. Reverse osmosis does not remove smaller elements such as fluoride and boron.

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10 hours ago, Lacessit said:

I just boil water, easier and kills everything. Filters do NOT remove added soluble chemicals, unless the filter is activated carbon. Reverse osmosis does not remove smaller elements such as fluoride and boron.

 

RO removes fluoride, and most kitchen mounted RO filters have 2 activated carbon filters. Mine has a pre and post filter. 

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13 hours ago, Lacessit said:

I just boil water, easier and kills everything. Filters do NOT remove added soluble chemicals, unless the filter is activated carbon. Reverse osmosis does not remove smaller elements such as fluoride and boron.

I'm looking for something a bit more convenient than boiling water before drinking.

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2 hours ago, Mama Noodle said:

 

RO removes fluoride, and most kitchen mounted RO filters have 2 activated carbon filters. Mine has a pre and post filter. 

I'd like to see a link for that, please.

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