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Water Filter - Drinking Only


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8 hours ago, Mama Noodle said:

Keep in mind that those water bottles you get are likely purified by RO. 

And those 1 baht per liter drinking water machines are also (allegedly) RO machines. 

IMO your OP was asking the correct questions. Drinking water in the home, on tap, its a time saver. Safer too. 

I am the OP.

I've never used those street dispensing machines.

The company that delivers in Phuket uses several methods to purify their water.

 

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Yes, 5 filters total, the 3 main ones I change about every 3 months, the other 2, about every 6 months.    Not more than a few hundred baht for a set of 5.    Better you do it yoursel

I just boil water, easier and kills everything. Filters do NOT remove added soluble chemicals, unless the filter is activated carbon. Reverse osmosis does not remove smaller elements such as fluoride

https://www.livestrong.com/article/527125-does-reverse-osmosis-remove-fluoride/

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9 hours ago, Mama Noodle said:

Keep in mind that those water bottles you get are likely purified by RO. 

And those 1 baht per liter drinking water machines are also (allegedly) RO machines. 

IMO your OP was asking the correct questions. Drinking water in the home, on tap, its a time saver. Safer too. 

I am the OP.

I've never used those street dispensing machines.

The company that delivers in Phuket uses several methods to purify their water.

 

h2o.JPG

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27 minutes ago, RocketDog said:

Masuma. Made in Thailand, good stainless steel, welded. Three cannister. Carbon filter followed by ion exchange water softener beads, with a faucet nozzle for cooking water. Third stage is ceramic filter with small nozzle for drinking water. 

 

First two cylinders have screw tops to allow powder filter material to be easily replaced. Ceramic filter will last for years if it's occasionally removed and scrubbed with salt. Valves also can be turned to allow both larger cylinders to be back-flushed. 

Just connect to a pressurized water tap (I use one intended for a dishwasher) and it works great. I've had this one for over a year and only back flushed one. Replacement carbon and zeolite beads are cheap. Never replaced them yet. Each bag is less than 100฿. I think it would take 2-3 bags for each cylinder. 

 

I estimate we use about 10-15L/week for cooking and drinking. The medium will last for more than a year at that rate. 

There are two sizes available, the largest costs 7,000฿ at Thaiwatsadu. 

 

I am very happy with its performance and its been well worth the cost. Having it right in the kitchen is very handy. I love it. 

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That is the old traditional system used in Bangkok where water is fit to drink from tap and indeed helps to improve taste and will give some protection from most bacteria and virus and will still be found in many shophouses.  But for most home use has been superseded by the advent of RO process.

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OK, so the Little Lady went to the big city today for several matters and included HomePro on her itinerary to ask about purifiers.  Long story short, this world champion shopper (volume category) bought one without consulting me.

This one:  (Seems much like the one Rocketdog showed)

 

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She paid about 600 more than the Lazada price, but at least I can stop looking and can't be blamed for anything to do with it.  Just have to pay!

 

Thanks all for your input, looks like many are getting into the discussion.

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2 hours ago, lopburi3 said:

That is the old traditional system used in Bangkok where water is fit to drink from tap and indeed helps to improve taste and will give some protection from most bacteria and virus and will still be found in many shophouses.  But for most home use has been superseded by the advent of RO process.

Perhaps true. I like the simplicity of this unit. No electricity/pumps, works on minimum inlet pressure with decent flow rates, easy to service/maintain, inexpensive and common media, etc. 

 

Apples and oranges. 

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9 hours ago, RocketDog said:

Perhaps true. I like the simplicity of this unit. No electricity/pumps, works on minimum inlet pressure with decent flow rates, easy to service/maintain, inexpensive and common media, etc. 

 

Apples and oranges. 

I had such a unit for several decades but having used and maintained feel replacement of filters in modern units much more to my liking.  And RO water just tastes better.

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