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It used to be that your name in the chanot would be written in Thai. 

Your passport number would not be in the chanot.

Is this still the case? 

(Talking about Phrakhanong land office)

How safe is this? After all, there is no official way of transscription of foreign names.

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17 minutes ago, Peterw42 said:

There is an official translation of your name, it involves having a translation of your name certified by the Thai ministry of Foreign Affairs.

An official certified translation is required to get married, get a yellow book etc

I didn't know this. 

How would I proceed to do this? 

Thanks! 

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 Out of curiosity are you referencing  a Chanote -which can only detail ownership of  land or a Condominium Title Deed -sometimes and incorrectly called a Chanote.

A Condominium Title Deed ,as the name implies, details the owner (s) of a  condominium apartment.

Edited by Delight
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49 minutes ago, Kiujunn said:

I didn't know this. 

How would I proceed to do this? 

Thanks! 

You may find a local translator that can do a translation and send it off to the MFA in Bangkok for certification, otherwise a trip to the MFA where there are translators in the same building.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Delight said:

 Out of curiosity are you referencing  a Chanote -which can only detail ownership of  land or a Condominium Title Deed -sometimes and incorrectly called a Chanote.

A Condominium Title Deed ,as the name implies, details the owner (s) of a  condominium apartment.

A condominium title deed 🙂

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19 hours ago, Peterw42 said:

There is an official translation of your name, it involves having a translation of your name certified by the Thai ministry of Foreign Affairs.

An official certified translation is required to get married, get a yellow book etc

My experience regarding translation for marriage and yellow book, marriage was not required and the yellow book was just a simple translation from a local translational shop done while I waited. I don't suggest you are wrong, but we all know municipal offices requirements are different from one end of the country to the other.

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22 hours ago, Peterw42 said:

There is an official translation of your name, it involves having a translation of your name certified by the Thai ministry of Foreign Affairs.

An official certified translation is required to get married, get a yellow book etc

My wife changed her name to mine and is written in Thai on her ID etc.

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14 minutes ago, brianthainess said:

My wife changed her name to mine and is written in Thai on her ID etc.

Did that require an MFA certification ?

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36 minutes ago, brianthainess said:

My wife changed her name to mine and is written in Thai on her ID etc.

I have seen this a couple of times (TG married to farang took his name, ID card says "Kanjana Rodriguez" written in Thai, so Thais cannot read it and farang cannot read it)

Edited by Kiujunn
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Problem is, those farang names like Schmeichel, de Gea, Vidić or Solskjær, if you try to transliterate them back into "English" the result tends to be some undecipherable mess, without much semblancy to the original.

It's easier with names like Robinson or Johnson. 

 

I am surprised I have never heard of problems,  eg from people trying to sell their condo. 

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My wife changed her name to mine and is written in Thai on her ID etc.

 

You are all getting off the main subject here.

There are no similarities between a farang name on a Chanoot or other document and a Thai lady changing her name to a her husbands surname. Totally different issues.

 

A Thai lady can change her surname on her ID card, Tibbian baan quite easily. The translation into the foreign surname will be done for the first new document (namely the ID card), then that translation is carried through forever on whatever documents she must deal with in the future (could Chanoots, tax filing, local Tessabban requirements etc). Of course the marriage papers (whatever type the person has) will be in her maiden name (this cannot be changed).

 

FYI----my first translation from my farang name into Thai, was done when I was married (many moons ago). Over the years for any documents that need my name in Thai, I have shown this. Therefore (and I feel this is important) the same translation is on all my documents, cards WP etc.

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3 hours ago, Kiujunn said:

have seen this a couple of times (TG married to farang took his name, ID card says "Kanjana Rodriguez" written in Thai, so Thais cannot read it and farang cannot read it)

Edited 2 hours ago by Kiujunn

 

The wife's ID card has her name in both Thai and English.

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