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Retirement investment managed fund for my Thai partner...?


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Hello...

Anyone who has any experience in this area I’d be grateful to hear from them.

I like my Thai partner to start up some sort of managed fund investment to save for their retirement.

I’d be helping with contributions of course.

The idea would be to start making regular contributions into a managed share fund that’s specifically designed for retirement so that they will have an income after I’m gone.

 

Can anyone who might be doing this or have the knowledge point me in the right direction and recommended a fund..?

 

Much appreciated.

 

Mike.

 

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You're wise to do this.  Many Thai people don't do this or they do it using methods that may not be the best, such as buying land or gold.  Often young working people have the "dream" of owning their

Happy to be proved wrong, but I thought that to qualify for ISA's one had to be a UK resident.

At the risk of going off topic here, eligibility for an ISA is based on residency, not nationality. If a Brit based in Thailand opens one he has to sign the declaration that he is a tax resident of th

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2 hours ago, NancyL said:

they do it using methods that may not be the best, such as buying land

my wife has done very well buying farmland... in 15 years value has increased near 4x purchase price w/the added benefit of the family making a living farming the land... 

 

of course, you have to be knowledgeable about your purchases... but land has been a good investment vehicle here.. 

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7 minutes ago, 1FinickyOne said:

my wife has done very well buying farmland... in 15 years value has increased near 4x purchase price w/the added benefit of the family making a living farming the land... 

 

of course, you have to be knowledgeable about your purchases... but land has been a good investment vehicle here.. 

I hope she's setting up a good retirement fund for you. :thumbsup:

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Don't listen to anyone here, get professional advice.......however.......there are tax free vehicles for investment depending what nationality you are..... you should 'fill' these before investing anywhere else.

 

If you are British I would use your full ISA allowance and then start a SIPP you can then make use of the governments contributions that will be added to the SIPP.

 

All the above are very easy to do through your own name and your wife can be a nominated beneficiary.

 

I would surf, take your time....look at Hargreaves Lansdown and AJBell....don't rush into anything.

 

I can name funds I have made over 30% in three months (I can also names shares where I have a lost a small fortune).....you will see this term a lot DYOR......Do your own research.......but back it up with INDEPENDENT financial advice from an expert.

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Not an income generator as such, but my wife has one final annual payment to make this year, to complete what I would describe as a 15-year Endowment Policy of some kind. The annual payment is 15k so she will pay in 180k. At first she was talking about it being worth 1m baht on maturity but I have lowered her expectations a little but to be honest I have no clue what she will get. I'd be happy for her if she were correct of course. She did well to think so far ahead. Well before we met just 4 years ago.

 

It's with Bangkok Insurance (not bank) and comes with a life policy of 200k.

 

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17 minutes ago, Surelynot said:

If you are British I would use your full ISA allowance

Every IFA I speak to tells me this. You get maybe 1.5% pa on GBP 10,000 TAXFREE. That's GBP 150 @ 20% = 3 QUID.

Do it regularly for 50 years and you may have something to talk about.

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2 minutes ago, phetphet said:

Happy to be proved wrong, but I thought that to qualify for ISA's one had to be a UK resident.

True...he can open the account in his name (if he is British) and put what is considered to be her money into it..........of course you do have currency conversions and the problem of trust.....probably not worth the hassle at the end of the day......just a shame to miss out on ISA allowances which are amazing.

 

Maybe one of the reasons for me saying don't listen to anyone on here....especially me!!!!

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9 minutes ago, KannikaP said:

Every IFA I speak to tells me this. You get maybe 1.5% pa on GBP 10,000 TAXFREE. That's GBP 150 @ 20% = 3 QUID.

Do it regularly for 50 years and you may have something to talk about.

True, but I was thinking of a stocks&shares ISA overtime they will make a fortune........I have bullied all my kids into saving all their pennies into funds.

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21 hours ago, mikey88 said:

Hello...

Anyone who has any experience in this area I’d be grateful to hear from them.

I like my Thai partner to start up some sort of managed fund investment to save for their retirement.

I’d be helping with contributions of course.

The idea would be to start making regular contributions into a managed share fund that’s specifically designed for retirement so that they will have an income after I’m gone.

 

Can anyone who might be doing this or have the knowledge point me in the right direction and recommended a fund..?

 

Much appreciated.

 

Mike.

 

are you asking for a life savings plan invested with Thai listed funds? I think SCB has such a plan where you contribute each month until you reach a capital threshold, and your funds are invested in some fixed income or variable securities.

 

If you have a starting capital, says a min of 10millions THB, you might want to try SCB Wealth Management, but not sure how good their investment salesmen, ooops, I mean "advisors", could do a good job by finding the right securities to invest into.

 

Maybe buy a property instead, might be a safer bet in the long run

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there are a lot Thai and Index funds, some performing very poorly, need to be careful

 

one has a nice dividend, they hold the leases for the BTS, another invest only in the top listed companies with a high dividend yield (5% and above). Again price is everything, so you need to time it right.

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22 hours ago, mikey88 said:

 

I like my Thai partner to start up some sort of managed fund investment to save for their retirement.

Most active funds and their fund managers regularly underperform the major indices. In order to find those that outperform, you would need something that your Thai partner and you (and most people) don’t seem to have: time and knowledge. Otherwise you’ll be just handing over your money to someone who gets you less return than a passive fund but charges you a ridiculous fee for it.
 

An exception might be tax benefits, which currently exist for RMF and those new LTF replacements (forgot the name, SPF I think they are called). Even if you want to take those, I wouldn’t put all my money there, as they are only investing in Thai equities, and you don’t want to put all your money into one tiny market (they only give you tax benefits up to a certain amount anyway). 
 

Unfortunately, in Thailand you don’t have access to cost-efficient passively managed ETFs. Try to open an account in your home country (if possible and if you can invest in those funds there) and then regularly transfer money there (for example, earn money for 6 months before making one big transfer to justify the transfer fees). Some people use an online broker like Interactive Brokers (the transfer issue is the same). 
 

 

 

Edited by welovesundaysatspace
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Bangkok Bank offer mutual funds among which is the Fidelity Technology Fund and the wellington global healthcare-usa based.

 

Both very good high performing funds in sectors I think should continue to do well. (this is not advice!!).

 

We use both and buy automatically on a fixed day and fixed amount each month to achieve 'baht cost averaging' rather than try to beat the market timing- or 'forget' to make a payment.

 

These are not retirement funds as such but we use them to build a pot for that purpose.

 

The branch (left as you leave town) along the road to the rail station has a ground floor car park and upstairs level with investment advisors who are very helpful

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