Jump to content
Thai Visa Forum

Blue Mekong Is Bad Omen


Recommended Posts

Blue Mekong Is Bad Omen

 

Screen-Shot-2564-02-08-at-19.03-1.jpg

 

NAKHON PHANOM, Feb 9 (TNA) – The Mekong River by this northeastern province turned beautifully blue but officials warned it was a sign of danger.

 

The level of the river plummeted to its lowest point, at about one meter deep, and vast sand dunes emerged. The blueish water like seawater happened for the second year and amazed local residents and tourists.

 

Full Story: https://tna.mcot.net/english-news/line-today-english-news-633750

 

tnalogo.jpg

-- © Copyright TNA 2021-02-09
 
Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, tifino said:

at the mercy of the CCP 

And also the Lao-Thai built Sayabouly dam, even though its a 'run of the river' dam, I am sure it retains some reservoir of what water is left over from China as well as a lot of nurturing sediment. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Thailand can thank their buddies for the problems the Mekong is suffering and can only see problems escalating in the future ! of the once Mighty Mekong

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, 3MagicBeers said:

And also the Lao-Thai built Sayabouly dam, even though its a 'run of the river' dam, I am sure it retains some reservoir of what water is left over from China as well as a lot of nurturing sediment. 

And the several others in Laos, most of which are dependent on Thailand buying the electricity.

Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, malathione said:

And the several others in Laos, most of which are dependent on Thailand buying the electricity.

not to mention Thailand being dependent on same electricity

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, tonray said:

not to mention Thailand being dependent on same electricity

Thailand actually has surplus capacity currently the bulk of which is gas generated...

Edited by malathione
additional info
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, malathione said:

Thailand actually has surplus capacity currently the bulk of which is gas generated...

At what price compared to Laos generation ?

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, tonray said:

At what price compared to Laos generation ?

Transmission lines and land rights of way all the way to Bangkok and social costs included? Do your own research and enlighten us. As it is, imported electricity is about 9% of the total capacity. Insignificant.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Typical Communist Party thinking. Create a problem, then when people are miserable and hopeless, give them some band aids and eventually a cure. Happened with COVID, now happening with water. What's next? Oxygen?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Muhendis said:

It's popular to blame the Chinese for this sort of problem but the fact is there is less snow in the Himalayas where the Mekong rises. Less snow and therefore less water.

But enough for the Chinese dams to work efficiently, just the poor <deleted> at the end of the line gets stuffed.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Dam Causes Bluish Clear Mekong

 

mkg.jpg

 

BANGKOK, Feb 10 (TNA) - An academic on water resources engineering said the Mekong River turned clearly blue because the Xayaburi dam in Laos is withholding water.

 

Assist Prof Nat Marjang of the Department of Water Resources Engineering at Kasetsart University said the Mekong River turned blue in the dry season because the Xayaburi dam was withholding water for its electricity generation.

 

The water retention slowed down the current of the river and most sediment was settling in the reservoir of the dam.

 

Source: https://tna.mcot.net/english-news/line-today-english-news-634523

 

 

tnalogo.jpg
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, malathione said:

And the several others in Laos, most of which are dependent on Thailand buying the electricity.

The Xayaboury dam is currently the only one built and operational on the mainstream Mekong between Laos-Thailand. However three more are in the works - Pakbeng, Luang Prabang and Paklay. The Luang Prabang mainstream Mekong dam is also being built by the same Thai company as the completed Xayabouly dam. All access roads and worker accommodation has been cleared and completed. Construction to commence at the end of this year. It is also a 'run of the river' dam ie with no or very little reservoir.

Edited by 3MagicBeers
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, 3MagicBeers said:

The Xayaboury dam is currently the only one built and operational on the mainstream Mekong between Laos-Thailand. However three more are in the works - Pakbeng, Luang Prabang and Paklay. The Luang Prabang mainstream Mekong dam is also being built by the same Thai company as the completed Xayabouly dam. All access roads and worker accommodation has been cleared and completed. Construction to commence at the end of this year. It is also a 'run of the river' dam ie with no or very little reservoir.

Yes. But when you dam the tributaries that feed into the river, you alter the flow of water into the Mekong. Laotian tributaries are one of the larger components of water input into the Mekong mainstream.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2021 at 2:32 PM, webfact said:

The water retention slowed down the current of the river and most sediment was settling in the reservoir of the dam.

Which makes me wonder?  If the sediment settles behind the dam, then how much additional pressure does that create on the dam's surface.  I"m sure some engineers has figured this out - maybe.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...