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Any one doing the OMAD diet ( One Meal a Day )


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A friend in the uk keeps telling me how he’s made great progress in his weight loss quest by following some thing called the OMAD diet . I have done some google searching about this type of diet and over all the comments generally seem positive. 

 

The One Meal A Day (OMAD) diet is a form of intermittent fasting where you fast for 23 hours and eat for the same 1-hour window each day.

 

Just wondering if any one here is currently doing / has in the past been on this OMAD routine and can comment on how things worked out .
 

 

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Its not magic, you simply eat less than normal - In the sort term I suspect it will be hard, but you will loose a lot of weight (not just fat) and may run into some gastric distress if you try to eat all your previous calories in that 60 minute window.

 

Overall I would suggest its not sustainable for MOST, but in general calorie restriction has been show to lead to increases in longevity 

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I'm currently doing a four hour eating window which is similar to OMAD. OMAD is often done with a two hour eating window. It's often recommended to transition into OMAD perhaps starting with an 8 hour eating window. It really depends on your goals and what you can tolerate. The thing I don't like about OMAD is too much pressure to get all your nutrition in one meal. Whatever you do its important to eat ample healthy fats and limit carbs and sugar in order to avoid unbearable hunger during the fasting periods.

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Anything that reduces calorie intake will do the trick, but that one doesn’t seem sustainable. The body adapts to fewer calories so when you stop it the extra food you eat thereafter is converted into fat stores. Reduced calories coupled by higher activity levels should work ... will take longer but can be incorporated into lifestyle such that the weight loss is maintained.

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I only eat one meal a day and have done so for many many years.  No doubt my body has now adapted to it, so I doubt that there is any real dietary benefit from my eating one meal a day, but I do feel better with 23 odd hours between meals.  if I do try to eat, say breakfast, or lunch, however light,  I feel terrible. slow and lethargic. I would not recommend this way of eating to anyone, but it is okay for me. One real benefit in dietary terms is that it makes losing weight easy, as all I have to do is cut down on one meal, if only slightly, and the weight drops off quickly. 

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5 hours ago, AlexRich said:

Reduced calories coupled by higher activity levels should work ... will take longer but can be incorporated into lifestyle such that the weight loss is maintained.

The common CICO prescription that usually fails and leaves the USA on track for 60% obesity by 2025. It doesn't get to the main issue of insulin resistance and fewer carbs that fasting and low carb diets do. It doesn't address the hunger issue. OP's probably tried it already. 

 

So let him give OMAD a go and if it's too difficult, or after he's achieved his goal, he can try one of the other many versions of IF. Even so, during eating periods he'll need to avoid insulin spikes. That may not be so difficult as you might think. 

 

The researchers followed 200 patients with type 2 diabetes over a period of three years. They found that a moderate carbohydrate restriction (70–130 g/day) was enough to have a positive effect on the patients’ health markers, and that the diet is “highly effective, safe and sustainable”. 

--https://www.dietdoctor.com/new-study-is-low-carb-sustainable-long-term

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I've been on OMAD for 10 years give or take, though weight loss wasn't my goal but for optimizing my energy levels (no more fluctuations / peaks / drops just smooth), stable focus etc.  Different people I know use different types of IF & in my opinion its best to use what works best for your goals & health.  For me OMAD is more sustainable & easier, for some of my friends larger windows or other "structures" of IF are more sustainable.  End of the day it's what you personally find can become positively "normal" for you that will work best for you.     

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6 hours ago, tfc said:

I've been on OMAD for 10 years give or take, though weight loss wasn't my goal but for optimizing my energy levels (no more fluctuations / peaks / drops just smooth), stable focus etc.  Different people I know use different types of IF & in my opinion its best to use what works best for your goals & health.  For me OMAD is more sustainable & easier, for some of my friends larger windows or other "structures" of IF are more sustainable.  End of the day it's what you personally find can become positively "normal" for you that will work best for you.     

I can understand how it might work for somebody trying to lose weight, but what you describe doesn't make sense.

Eating many small meals would be what would result in stable levels. After eating your one giant meal a day your energy levels go up to the roof, and then after your body digested this it goes into starvation mode until the next meal, this is the opposite of stable.

You say you don't do it for weight loss, and are doing it since ten years, so obviously your one meal has to cover your maintenance calorie level. I assume you are a normal man, this would probably be about 2500 kcal. How do you eat 2500 kcal in one meal? With just junk food I might see how this is possible (still difficult though), but if you also want to get a decent amount of protein, and micro nutrients (vegetables, fruits...) in, I would say that's impossible to do. What do you eat for your OMAD?

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On 3/11/2021 at 2:24 PM, jackdd said:

I can understand how it might work for somebody trying to lose weight, but what you describe doesn't make sense.

Eating many small meals would be what would result in stable levels. After eating your one giant meal a day your energy levels go up to the roof, and then after your body digested this it goes into starvation mode until the next meal, this is the opposite of stable.

You say you don't do it for weight loss, and are doing it since ten years, so obviously your one meal has to cover your maintenance calorie level. I assume you are a normal man, this would probably be about 2500 kcal. How do you eat 2500 kcal in one meal? With just junk food I might see how this is possible (still difficult though), but if you also want to get a decent amount of protein, and micro nutrients (vegetables, fruits...) in, I would say that's impossible to do. What do you eat for your OMAD?

 

I'll have to give my "broscience" explanation because I'm no scientist & basically just followed the basic guidelines from a book called the "Warrior Diet" by Ori Hofmekler.  From what I recall, having read it over 10 years ago, after an initial few weeks the body shifts/swaps the leptin/ghrelin (paraphrasing here) & the body is no longer in starvation mode during the day.  I can only speak from my own experience but for myself I only experienced mild hunger for a few days before the shift/swap etc.  

It's arguable whether I'm a normal man 😉 but that aside, I eat until I'm full.  I can usually eat between 3-4 chicken breasts/thighs, a big salad, 1.5-2 small containers of sour cream, butter, cheese (probably only once a week), "cloud bread" & I'm pretty much done.  When I was in Australia I ate more beef & whatever vegetables/salads were in season.  I also tend to eat more cheese when I'm there, perhaps 3-4 times a week.  I'm not sure if how I eat is supposed to be possible/impossible but it works for me.  I get a full health check twice/year & though my doctor here thinks I'm a bit crazy, though that may just be me not my diet, apparently everything is good.  Same with my doctor in Australia.  

I'm not one to recommend/not recommend diets of any sort, aside from (in general) avoiding junk food.  I'm just sharing my experience on the OMAD but I'd guesstimate that it's not for everyone & only really talk about it if asked, or if there's a thread asking about it such as this one.  If anyone expresses interest in IF/OMAD though I always encourage them to be open to the different forms of IF because from my experience & that of friends there are a lot of variables that come into play that & for whatever reason some forms of IF work better for others & some really just don't.  For what its worth I'm also a life long martial artist, which is one of the reasons that I was interested in sustained, stable focus/energy & for me I like that I can train at anytime during the day & feel ready to train within 30-45 mins after my one meal as well.       

 

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