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Massive iceberg ‒ larger than New York City ‒ breaks off in Antarctica


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A massive iceberg, larger than New York City, has broken off from an ice shelf in Antarctica, according to researchers on Friday. 

 

The 490-square mile iceberg broke away from the Brunt Ice Shelf about a decade after scientists started detecting cracks in the ice, wrote the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) in a statement.

 

New York City is roughly 302 square miles.

 

"Our teams at BAS have been prepared for the calving of an iceberg from Brunt Ice Shelf for years," said professor Dame Jane Francis, director of British Antarctic Survey.

 

The first indication that the glacier would break off occurred in November, when a new chasm – called North Rift – headed toward another large chasm about 20 miles away.

 

In January, the rift pushed northeast at more than half a mile each day, cutting through the 490-foot thick floating ice shelf.

 

The iceberg formed after the crack widened on the morning of Feb. 26, "releasing it from the rest of [the] floating ice shelf," according to the BAS.

 

The BAS monitors the ice shelf daily using an automated network of high-precision GPS instruments surrounding Halley Research Station, which measures how the ice shelf is deforming and moving, Francis said.

 

The teams also use satellite images from ESA, NASA, and the German satellite TerraSAR-X. 

 

"Halley Station is located inland of all the active chasms, on the part of the ice shelf that remains connected to the continent," said Francis.

 

"Our network of GPS instruments will give us early warning if the calving of this iceberg causes changes in the ice around our station."

 

The 12-person team left Halley Research Station early last month, which is now closed for the Antarctic winter.

 

The station was safe from the break since it relocated inland in 2016 to avoid the paths of two chasms -- named "Chasm 1" and "Halloween Crack."

 

Francis added that in the coming weeks or months, the iceberg may move away, or aground and remain close to the Brunt Ice Shelf.  

 

"Our job now is to keep a close eye on the situation and assess any potential impact of the present calving on the remaining ice shelf," said Simon Garrod, Director of Operations at BAS.

 

"We continuously review our contingency plans to ensure the safety of our staff, protect our research station, and maintain the delivery of the science we undertake at Halley."

 

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Well it is waiting for more of them to break , earth out of balance and then flip.

Just another ice age.

Maybe followed the by an outbreak of super volcano in Yellowstone and the we are off.

Time for new species?

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8 hours ago, phantomfiddler said:

First Covid and now this, how can a poor man stand such times and live 🙂

yeah!! humankind just can't get a 'Break' 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/1/2021 at 11:08 PM, Thaivisa Web Content Team said:

The teams also use satellite images from ESA, NASA, and the German satellite TerraSAR-X. 

 

"Halley Station is located inland of all the active chasms, on the part of the ice shelf that remains connected to the continent," said Francis.

 

"Our network of GPS instruments will give us early warning if the calving of this iceberg causes changes in the ice around our station."

 

The 12-person team left Halley Research Station early last month, which is now closed for the Antarctic winter.

 

The station was safe from the break since it relocated inland in 2016 to avoid the paths of two chasms -- named "Chasm 1" and "Halloween Crack."

Before "WE" started sticking our noses into the region with our technology... this was considered normal... now it's climate change... Lol. 

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2 hours ago, Freeduhdum said:

Before "WE" started sticking our noses into the region with our technology... this was considered normal... now it's climate change... Lol. 

I guess you know this is normal because you were sticking your nose into the region?

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On 3/3/2021 at 4:56 PM, natway09 said:

Shipping beware depending on it's travels

 

Titanic ... ?

   What a movie ...

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On 3/12/2021 at 5:27 PM, Freeduhdum said:

Before "WE" started sticking our noses into the region with our technology... this was considered normal... now it's climate change... Lol. 

It's no doubt 'normal' in the million-year perspective, but that's scarcely helpful to H. sapiens in the 21st century.

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5 minutes ago, ExpatOilWorker said:

Nothing. It was floating  before it broke off.

Huh. Probably the ocean rising that broke it off then, yes?

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On 3/12/2021 at 8:03 PM, elliss said:

Titanic ... ?

Is it Coming another one love story?..🤔

Edited by Tarteso
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At present there is no evidence that to suggest this calving is due to climate change/global warming. But scientists will watch the shelf to see if anything else happens, such as whole shelf destabilisation.

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18 hours ago, Yellowtail said:

Huh. Probably the ocean rising that broke it off then, yes?

???????????????????

Antarctic ice shelves are formed by snow ( ice ) from inland flowing to the sea. They always break off at the edges, but not usually in such large bits. As they are floating before they break off the fact they break off does not raise sea level.

If it is to do with rising sea levels, that would be the normal tidal variation and not IMO to do with global sea level rise.

Off the west coast of Ross Island there is a floating glacier tongue that is very long and breaks off when it gets too long. IMO that is the same sort of event as happened in the OP- quite natural, and to be expected occasionally. Humans have been going to the Antarctic for such a short time that no one really knows that much about the natural events that occur.

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On 3/12/2021 at 9:27 PM, Freeduhdum said:

Before "WE" started sticking our noses into the region with our technology... this was considered normal... now it's climate change... Lol. 

 

Quote

Researchers said there is no evidence that climate change played a significant role in the event.

"Change in the ice at Halley is a natural process and there is no connection to the calving events seen on Larsen C Ice Shelf," according to the BAS.

 

Edited by Salerno
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 3/16/2021 at 6:00 PM, TKDfella said:

At present there is no evidence that to suggest this calving is due to climate change/global warming. But scientists will watch the shelf to see if anything else happens, such as whole shelf destabilisation.

Actually, there is.

Ocean-driven thinning enhances iceberg calving and retreat of Antarctic ice shelves

https://www.pnas.org/content/112/11/3263

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21 minutes ago, placeholder said:

Actually, there is.

Ocean-driven thinning enhances iceberg calving and retreat of Antarctic ice shelves

https://www.pnas.org/content/112/11/3263

Thanks for the link. However, this was a study which offered suggestions from its conclusions. One hopes that the actual massive break off occurring that those in power will take notice.

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