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I am being asked to write a letter for a family member to get them approved for parole. They want me to put down my THAI ID as well which concerns me. The letter needs to state that the prisoner will be living in the same house as me. What I'm worried about is the responsibilities. Would I be able to leave the house for vacation for example? If this person commits a crime will I also be held accountable? Will I be financially responsible for this person? I'm being told this is a normal thing for family members to do for the prisoner in order to ask for parole in Thailand. I'm wondering if this is the same as a parole sponsor in regards to the responsibilities. They are calling it a guarantor? 

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1 hour ago, ThaiAmericanHalfie said:

The letter needs to state that the prisoner will be living in the same house as me.

 

Is the ex-prisoner going to be living with you if they get released?

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8 hours ago, Patong2021 said:

Ask yourself the following;

1. Do you know this person well? If no, do not sign.

2. Do you know what the actual crime was, and has the person accepted responsibility if the person was responsible for the crime.  If no, do not sign.

3. Would you accept living in same home as  the person, and trust that person to behave? If no, do not sign.

4. Why are you being asked and not other relatives? Maybe those relatives do not want to sign for good reason.

5. Ask parole office what legal responsibility you are assuming. Do not ask the family. You may be in for an unpleasant surprise if this is a guarantor document.

Number 2 55555555

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SIL sponsored a nephew once....but never again! HE disappeared along with bulk Baht of jewelry phones and Cash. The jewelry was tracked thru a pawnshop, but the Bibs  would not assist retrieval. SIL even tried to deal a recovery with the new 'owner' 

Anyway I recall he was always acting suss... never sleep when everyone else did... just made out he was slways online playing games - but was simply waiting for his opportunity...

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On 3/3/2021 at 11:24 AM, BritManToo said:

Agree to do it, but never actually get around to writing the letter.

 

Yes, it took me a while to learn the Thai way.

 

I always hummed and hawed when Thai people asked me to do something I didn't really want to do. For example, a teaching gig or some other commitment.

 

I eventually learned to say yes, to tell them what they wanted to hear, but to then forget about it. Because there is never any follow up!!! And no need to feel responsible!

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NO!!!!!!!!!  DO NOT DO IT! You WILL be sucked into a vacuum of irreversible hell.  Tell them to find someone else.  You have Jesus tattooed on your forehead or something?  You ready to save the world...go ahead...not my problem it's ALL on you now. 

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On 3/3/2021 at 11:24 AM, BritManToo said:

Agree to do it, but never actually get around to writing the letter.

Dude.  You've lived in Thailand too long.  Now that's going native!

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Paroles a piece of cake.  Probably less reporting requirement than doing the farang potential criminal 90 day reports.  And as a plus?  After a set amount of time the parolee is free from all reporting requirements - unlike the farang potential criminals who must do 90 day reports ad-infinitum. 

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Could be a can of worms if you do, but likely fall foul of the family if don't. Would personally err on the side of caution and tell them to FO. Stand up for yourself; if you don't want to do something and feel uncomfortable, don't do it.

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Since the OP does not know all the implications of providing the parole letter and since no one here does either, why would he even consider taking on some risk that he doesn't understand?

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On 3/4/2021 at 12:25 AM, Patong2021 said:

Ask yourself the following;

1. Do you know this person well? If no, do not sign.

2. Do you know what the actual crime was, and has the person accepted responsibility if the person was responsible for the crime.  If no, do not sign.

3. Would you accept living in same home as  the person, and trust that person to behave? If no, do not sign.

4. Why are you being asked and not other relatives? Maybe those relatives do not want to sign for good reason.

5. Ask parole office what legal responsibility you are assuming. Do not ask the family. You may be in for an unpleasant surprise if this is a guarantor document.

Best reply yet, why don't other family members want to do it?

Or do they think coming from a foreigner will add weight to the application for parole.

I'd find out if it involves any responsibility for you after.. if yes, politely decline.

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What was/were the crime(s)?

If they involved stealing, drugs, gang activity, the rates of recidivism are too high to chance it.  Strangely, murderers typically don't commit again.

 

Will this person actually be living in your home?  The letter sounds like you will be acting as a guarantor.  What if the police come looking for him, or if criminals come?  What if they say the parolee owes money and now it is your responsibility?

 

Sounds like you don't even know this person, why would you ever be willing to sign your life over to him?

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