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Hospital appointment times


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Applies to both dental or hospital appointments , either government  or private .   So you have an appointment for 08 00 am but on arrival the place is packed with others who have the same booking time but it is based on a first come first served basis . Is there any way round this ? ( early ticket does not always work when they know you are a farang ) . I have waited all day before and finally saw the doctor at 17 00 hours  . I can understand in a gov hospital more so than a private one . However what we find is because of a lack of a booking system we have all patients along with their families all squashed into the waiting rooms with no consideration given to social distancing , face masks worn round their necks and no supervision or control from the hospital management .

 

There seems to be total apathy from those in charge and without an ability to install a workable appointment system . Is it beyond the wit of Thai admin staff or do they need farang guidance ?

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2 hours ago, Surelynot said:

Certainly doesn't apply in Hospitals like Bumrungrad.......on my 12th appointment, never waited more than 5mins.

I have looked at Bumrungrad which has a good reputation but have been put off by the covid 19 which is in and around the Bangkok area but good to hear they have a decent booking system .

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2 hours ago, Sheryl said:

It depends entirely on the hospital. If you want specific advice should indicate where in Thaland you are.

 

True of all government hospitals and also some of the less expensive private ones.

 

If that is the case at the hospital you use, and it is a private hospital, the thing to do is to arrive early to get in the cue, find out what your queue number is and how many ahead of you, then go have breakfasts/lunch and return.  The nurses will usually be able to give you that info.

 

The more expensive private hospitals do go by appointment system and are less likely to overbook for the same time slot - though they will still, among people with the same time slot, take the one who arrived first.

 

At a government hospital there  is no recourse but to plan on every visit taking a full day if not more, and getting there as early as possible. However there are often "after hours" clinics where for 250 - 500 baht more you will have less wait (but still some and still based on first come/first serve) plus be able to see a senior doctor directly, well worth it.

I am in the Surin area . I had an appointment 4 months ago at the Korat branch of Bangkok Hospital where their booking system was as I describe earlier , so I was not impressed  especially when the doctor could not speak English and so an interpreter was used .

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44 minutes ago, superal said:

I have looked at Bumrungrad which has a good reputation but have been put off by the covid 19 which is in and around the Bangkok area but good to hear they have a decent booking system .

I wouldn't be too concerned (famous last words).....covid in Bangkok is way out to the west....all the bars and restaurants are open here.....but better safe than sorry I guess

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Never had any problems in Buriram hospital. A few hours wait maximum and all doctors speak English. Queuing for your number can be a pain but the missus does that so much better than me.

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Several of the hospitals I’ve used operate using a kind of “block” based type of appointment system whereby a set number of people are all given the same block of time (say 09:00) as their appointment time... and then at 9:00am everyone who holds a 9am time is then seen on a first-in-first-out basis.  

 

I agree that BH seems to use a more accurate individual appointment system for a lot of their services... and i recall BNH was the same..

 

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My local hospital has recently adopted a number system, like you see in banks. Great, I thought. My wife went early to get a number and we got #1. Great, I thought. And then we sat there for over an hour as people with numbers waaaay over #1 got seen first. I don't understand the system, wife doesn't understand it either. Just normal Thai organisation I suppose, where nothing is ever as it seems. What makes it all the more frustrating is that I only need to see my drug dealer, my doctor, to give me another three months supply to keep my blood pressure etc in check. In my native UK I believe it's possible to do such routine things on-line now and the drugs are delivered by mail. Maybe in Thailand too, in 10 years from now.

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17 hours ago, superal said:

I have looked at Bumrungrad which has a good reputation but have been put off by the covid 19 which is in and around the Bangkok area but good to hear they have a decent booking system .

A few recorded cases of covid out of 10 million per day. You should take your chances and go to your hospital of choice. 

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19 hours ago, superal said:

I am in the Surin area . I had an appointment 4 months ago at the Korat branch of Bangkok Hospital where their booking system was as I describe earlier , so I was not impressed  especially when the doctor could not speak English and so an interpreter was used .

They always use interpreters at Korat BKK 

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1 hour ago, shackleton said:

Never had a problem with my 3 monthly appointments

at Samitivej hospital over 10 years now 

First class service 

 

That hospital saved my life , Love their Staff , Their  Cardiologist is the Best , very long last name but famous Thai family 

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1 hour ago, DavisH said:

A few recorded cases of covid out of 10 million per day. You should take your chances and go to your hospital of choice. 

 

Agree - if concerned, stay off the BTS/MRT and crowded buses, walk or use taxis, don't go to bars. That plus mask + hand sanitizer and your risk in coming to Bangkok is very, very  minimal.

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2 hours ago, Bangkok Barry said:

.... What makes it all the more frustrating is that I only need to see my drug dealer, my doctor, to give me another three months supply to keep my blood pressure etc in check. In my native UK I believe it's possible to do such routine things on-line now and the drugs are delivered by mail. Maybe in Thailand too, in 10 years from now.

 

it is quite possible to get med refills online/by mail in Thailand though not from a government hospital.

 

Note that most medications here do not need a prescription and can be bought over the counter.

 

See https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1155081-getting-your-medications-without-travelling-options/

 

 

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2 hours ago, Bangkok Barry said:

My local hospital has recently adopted a number system, like you see in banks. Great, I thought. My wife went early to get a number and we got #1. Great, I thought. And then we sat there for over an hour as people with numbers waaaay over #1 got seen first. I don't understand the system, wife doesn't understand it either. Just normal Thai organisation I suppose, where nothing is ever as it seems. What makes it all the more frustrating is that I only need to see my drug dealer, my doctor, to give me another three months supply to keep my blood pressure etc in check. In my native UK I believe it's possible to do such routine things on-line now and the drugs are delivered by mail. Maybe in Thailand too, in 10 years from now.

I have a similar tale , have ticket number 6 and been waiting nearly 2 hours , I look at the tv monitor which shows 35 .  So I ask my lady wth is going on ( edited ) ? and I am going to walk out , in a loud voice , and she turns away cos scared of losing face and embarrassed but the ticket caller hears me and then I am the next to be called , surprise , surprise ( being a farang has to be the main reason why I was bypassed  ? ) . also just to get a new supply of medication takes best part of one day , ( I asked nurse at reception , how many doctors are working today and the reply was one , I said why only one and  nurse said " how many you want " , well she made me laugh hysterically and calmed me down ( still laugh when I recall it )

BTW I have also noticed that monks seem to get priority , i.e. straight to the front of the queue , is that correct ?

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Kinda surprised you had this problem at Bangkok Hospital Korat. I've used them for many years. Anytime I have been there, they are never busy (to the point I always wonder how they stay afloat with so few patients) and it never takes me more than 15 mins to see a Dr if I have an appointment. You were probably unlucky to be there on a day where there was an unexpectedly large crowd of patients. I'd suggest you give it a try again and speak to the International dept there about getting you an English speaking doctor. All the doctors there I've ever had to visit have been able to converse in English. Good luck !

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I am a type 2 insulin dependent diabetic and when I lived in Khon Kaen Province, I attended Chum Phae Government Hospital for insulin, other medication and blood tests. Insulin was not available at local private pharmacies. My appointments throughout several years were always for 8am but on arrival I was always given a "raffle type" ticket and consultations were based on your number in the queue. I was never ever seen at 8am - it was always "first come, first served". I was told that local Thai people used to arrive around 6am or earlier, and leave their ID cards "in order" awaiting the arrival of reception staff with the book of tickets which were distributed in that order! It was always a "hit or miss" situation for me, either being seen and out by midday, or being told to come back after lunch, eventually leaving the hospital by 4pm. However, for other hospital consultations (including the removal of a benign tumour on my neck), I used the new, superb, Rachaphruek Private Hospital in Khon Kaen and what a difference regarding appointments, on time on most occasions, except when my doctor was in theatre performing emergency surgery which I was informed of. Here in Cambodia, it is so much easier and convenient as I can attend private pharmacies to purchase my insulin and other medication, also private clinics for the annual blood tests - no hospital appointments!

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26 minutes ago, DineshR said:

Kinda surprised you had this problem at Bangkok Hospital Korat. I've used them for many years. Anytime I have been there, they are never busy (to the point I always wonder how they stay afloat with so few patients) and it never takes me more than 15 mins to see a Dr if I have an appointment. You were probably unlucky to be there on a day where there was an unexpectedly large crowd of patients. I'd suggest you give it a try again and speak to the International dept there about getting you an English speaking doctor. All the doctors there I've ever had to visit have been able to converse in English. Good luck !

Indeed I was surprised and disappointed at the level of treatment and to top it all there was confusion between the doctor / translator and myself and in all the whole sitting took about 10 minutes and I was really annoyed at the level of aid / treatment  , plus a bill for 740 baht for nothing but a waste of time . BTW prior to the appointment I was told when making the booking that all doctors spoke either English or German as a foreign language . 

I guess I have been spoilt by the UK NHS standards , however the Bumrungrad in Bangkok seems to be a good choice along with the Samitivej I hear .

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Bangkok Hospital in Bangkok, never a problem.

Like all places blood test wait for results but that is the only wait of any signiticance

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11 minutes ago, Burma Bill said:

I am a type 2 insulin dependent diabetic and when I lived in Khon Kaen Province, I attended Chum Phae Government Hospital for monthly tests, insulin and other medication.  My appointments throughout several years were always for 8am but on arrival I was always given a "raffle type" ticket and consultations were based on your number in the queue. I was never ever seen at 8am - it was always "first come, first served". I was told that local Thai people used to arrive around 6am or earlier, and leave their ID cards "in order" awaiting the arrival of reception staff with the book of tickets which were distributed in that order! It was always a "hit or miss" situation for me, either being seen and out by midday, or being told to come back after lunch, eventually leaving the hospital by 4pm. However, for other hospital consultations (including the removal of a benign tumour on my neck), I used the new, superb, Rachaphruek Private Hospital in Khon Kaen and what a difference regarding appointments, on time on most occasions, except when my doctor was in theatre performing emergency surgery which I was informed of. Here in Cambodia, it is so much easier and convenient as I can attend private pharmacies to purchase my insulin and other medication, also private clinics for the annual blood tests - no hospital appointments!

Your above description mirrors mine exactly .  BTW do they have decent hospitals in Cambodia cos where I live there are many Cambodians who cross the border to Thailand for treatment  .

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6 minutes ago, superal said:

BTW do they have decent hospitals in Cambodia cos where I live there are many Cambodians who cross the border to Thailand for treatment  .

 There are several decent private hospitals in Phnom Penh as I recall from visits, however I live in Siem Reap which I am more familiar with. There are many small private hospitals and clinics of reasonable to high standard (at a cost), but the largest is the private Royal Angkor International Hospital, a member of Bangkok Dusit Medical  Services. On one occasion, I attended the Siem Reap Provincial Government Hospital for advice, but with respect, it was rather grim despite very helpful English speaking staff. In fact, the doctor I saw referred me to his private clinic across the road! Yes, many Cambodians (with money) do cross into Thailand for hospital treatment but for some, it can be a long journey within Cambodia to attend a quality hospital.  I think this could be one reason for those crossing from Northern Cambodia to hospitals in Surin - convenience, especially if they have the money. 

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