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How many folks have had a motorbike accident


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16 hours ago, richard_smith237 said:

Advice: Always wear a full-face helmet, always wear gloves, solid boots (as a very bare minimum) - always wear a riding jacket...  (I also always wear riding pants).

You are in a tiny minority in LOS then!

 

Way too hot for a proper riding jacket and pants. I took the gamble everytime I rode and was lucky 99-9% of the time.

 

However, I did like the m'bike taxi drivers do and wore good gloves. I hate to think how many Thais end up with injured hands from automatically putting out their hands when their bikes fall over. Never went out without my helmet and it saved my life in my accident ( not my fault as I was almost stationary and other driver not looking where he was going. Knocked unconscious, woke up meters away from my bike, and helmet smashed, but not my head.

 

 

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I only ever managed 1 pig, and even then I had problems.  

Smoking cannabis really helps with that joint pain. So a friend tells me.

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Motorbikes are way to dangerous, I've seen many travelers killed or badly injured over the years of traveling. My advice: never ride a bike.

 

It only take a minor accident at even a low speed and you can be killed or turned into a quadriplegic. Not worth the risk. Take a bus, walk, hitch hike, take a taxi, etc.

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4 minutes ago, Don Chance said:

Motorbikes are way to dangerous, I've seen many travelers killed or badly injured over the years of traveling. My advice: never ride a bike.

 

It only take a minor accident at even a low speed and you can be killed or turned into a quadriplegic. Not worth the risk. Take a bus, walk, hitch hike, take a taxi, etc.

Try living in a small town and do that. I lived in a small town- no baht buses, no taxis, terrible roads too narrow for cars. Either have a m'bike or use m'bike taxis.

Walk, 55555555555555555555. Try walking past packs of soi dogs.

Hitch hike- no one I knew thought that was a good idea in LOS, and my wife said I'd be looking to be murdered if I did that.

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Sort of like asking how much sand is on the beach? 😱🤔

 

You ride a motorbike in Thailand, you will get in a wreck or be hit by another motorbike at some point.....TIT.....🤪😱🤬

26F1F660-3B08-4AC6-AA07-A49490BBD9E0.jpeg

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18 hours ago, BritManToo said:

In time we will all become that stupid old lady.

 

Some may recall me posting a while back when I knocked an old dear off her bicycle (dark, ghost-riding, no lights).

 

I nearly got her again today, almost exactly the same situation (she thought better of crossing in front of me this time). Dark (5.20AM), still ghost-riding, no lights, dark clothing and this time she was hiding in the shadows too.

 

 

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1 minute ago, CharlieH said:

Difference is now you "expect" her to be there ! and are ready for it. She trained you well...5555

 

Indeed, in her ninja gear I could barely see her, it did take a second or two to register that she was there, luckily not moving.

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I just started reading the replies and I am already peeing my pants laughing at the comments and the postings. I love Crossy's recommendation for that 3 wheeled motorbike. I can see myself tooling down the road like easy rider on that bike. Britman sounds like my wife who keeps telling me to go slow on my bike. I will now resume reading more of the postings.

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I should have mentioned previously that I love Sanuk's posting How to drive a motorbike in Thailand. That is so hilarious and in some respects so true which makes it even more funny.  

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19 hours ago, BritManToo said:

I only ever managed 1 pig, and even then I had problems.

 

pig problem.jpg

Welp..I guess the BBQ is cancelled--you cant make friends with salad! 😞

 

The plus is the tailpipe can smoke the pork! 🙂

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19 hours ago, BritManToo said:

Speed kills, drive slower, wear a full face helmet, and you are unlikely to have any problems.

Drive to the local stores at 30Km/hr and you'll probably never have a problem.

Slow n steady wins the race every time! Could apply this to Loy Kroh Isaan Grannies too!

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19 hours ago, GreasyFingers said:

Simple rule: if you ride a bike you will have an accident. 

 

I will take this as a challenge. I'm now getting close to 100,000km in Thailand riding daily various bikes from 110 to 1000cc and not a single traffic accident, including daily commutes in Bangkok and many trips around the country. I know some older guys here who make my mileage look minuscule - it can be definitely done. 

My riding motto for riding in Thailand is "aggressive-defensive" which is far from "slow and steady". Key principles as follows:

  • Always riding ahead and slightly faster than other traffic (excluding some complete lunatics) 
  • Either accelerating or braking (avoid coasting)
  • Extermely alert, expecting the unexpected and ready on the brakes 
  • Never hesitate and be dominant, make your intentions clear to others (e.g. own your lane, rev the engine, use the horn etc.) 
  • Use power to accelerate out of danger 
  • Practice riding as fast & crazy as possible in a safe environment as often as you can - these skills will help in real life danger situations

My recommendations would be to get a bike with decent power (i.e. 150cc+ for town, 400cc+ for highway), ABS brakes and take as many riding courses as you can. It's amazing what you can still learn after a decade of riding from a professional instructor and how skills learned on track help you in real life situations. 

 

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Love riding the motorbike! 3 accidents, no one else involved. Always with helmet. All at low speed. One was in Cambodia. Two were brought on by holding something in my left hand while going around a corner, hit sand on the roadway, braked with right hand and down I went. Scrapes and sandpapered good. Looked like a mummy after the hospital treated me. The first accident was caused by my thinking I was protected in making a uturn. Doubled bodied truck was turning so I figured that would  protect me from both oncoming lanes. Half way into his turn, the trucker slowed to allow an oncoming car to pass on his left. Too late, my choice was to possibly be hit by the car or go down. Snapped my right collarbone. So ... I now keep both hands on the handle bar and do not think I can outsmart the unexpected.

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The question should be: "Who's lived in Thailand 5 years or more and NOT had some sort of Motorbike accident?".  Seem that no matter how defensively we drive there's always an idiot out there that can find us. 

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21 hours ago, watgate said:

   I told my wife after we finish building the house I will looking to get a 3 wheeled bike.

Probably the safest option in Thailand...Three Wheeled Bicycle High Resolution Stock Photography and Images - Alamyor this one for the market runs in the village..............Funny children Three Wheels cycle child bike kids bicycles tricycles toy  other vehicle equipment, Wholesale Bicycle products on Tradees.com

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2 hours ago, Crossy said:

 

Some may recall me posting a while back when I knocked an old dear off her bicycle (dark, ghost-riding, no lights).

 

I nearly got her again today, almost exactly the same situation (she thought better of crossing in front of me this time). Dark (5.20AM), still ghost-riding, no lights, dark clothing and this time she was hiding in the shadows too.

 

 

Nearest I came to killing someone in LOS was when driving along country road at night and a boy was riding his bicycle in middle of the road, dark clothes and no lights. He only lived because the road was too bad to drive at normal speed and I saw him in time to stop. Idiot must have seen my lights coming, but didn't try and move to side of the road.

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3 hours ago, Crossy said:

 

Some may recall me posting a while back when I knocked an old dear off her bicycle (dark, ghost-riding, no lights).

 

I nearly got her again today, almost exactly the same situation (she thought better of crossing in front of me this time). Dark (5.20AM), still ghost-riding, no lights, dark clothing and this time she was hiding in the shadows too.

 

 

There's shadows in the dark ?

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1 hour ago, SS1 said:

 

I will take this as a challenge. I'm now getting close to 100,000km in Thailand riding daily various bikes from 110 to 1000cc and not a single traffic accident, including daily commutes in Bangkok and many trips around the country. I know some older guys here who make my mileage look minuscule - it can be definitely done. 

My riding motto for riding in Thailand is "aggressive-defensive" which is far from "slow and steady". Key principles as follows:

  • Always riding ahead and slightly faster than other traffic (excluding some complete lunatics) 
  • Either accelerating or braking (avoid coasting)
  • Extermely alert, expecting the unexpected and ready on the brakes 
  • Never hesitate and be dominant, make your intentions clear to others (e.g. own your lane, rev the engine, use the horn etc.) 
  • Use power to accelerate out of danger 
  • Practice riding as fast & crazy as possible in a safe environment as often as you can - these skills will help in real life danger situations

My recommendations would be to get a bike with decent power (i.e. 150cc+ for town, 400cc+ for highway), ABS brakes and take as many riding courses as you can. It's amazing what you can still learn after a decade of riding from a professional instructor and how skills learned on track help you in real life situations. 

 

Agree completely. I have more than 100k km in the US and Canada on a superbike, and 15 years here on scooters and used that technique. Only ever gotten a bruise or two on road bikes.

 

A bicycle accident nearly killed me as a teen and a motocross accident in my 30s nearly killed me, but using the above advice on the street has prevented any real problems other than bumps.

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23 hours ago, watgate said:

After being involved in my first motorbike accident it got me wondering how many folks have been involved in a motorbike accident and what were the circumstances leading up to the accident. Also, what injuries did you sustain due to the motorbike accident.

     I never had ridden a motorbike until I came to Thailand so am pretty much a greenhorn. I had just finished some exercise and hopped on my bike to go back to my house. I had a lot on my mind due to building a house plus a problem with getting a Tax ID # for my wife which has been dragging on for more then 8 months. Nevertheless I lost focus when I was on the bike and when I looked up I knew I was in a heap of trouble since I was too far over on the shoulder and was heading for the downsloping embankment. I tried to compensate by accelerating and swerving to the right away from the embankment and the next thing I knew I had done a face plant on the pavement. 

     All things considered it could have been much worse. Luckily I did not break or fracture anything and had some nasty lacerations on both arm and my knee. I loosened at least one tooth and will have to go see a dentist to get an assessment how bad it is and if I might be needing an implant. It was a traumatic experience and one I will not soon forget. I am thinking, and maybe the experts can advise me if I am wrong, that what I should have done when I realized I was in a precarious situation on the bike that I should have let go of the accelerator and evenly as possible squeeze both brake levers hard to slow down. I am thinking had I done that I probably still would have crashed but I would have been going much slower and would not have been banged up so much.

     I told my wife after we finish building the house I will looking to get a 3 wheeled bike. I don't feel comfortable anymore on a 2 wheel conventional motorbike and I would feel more safe on a 3 wheeled bike. I really would only use the bike to go to the store or go to the mountain in the morning to park my bike at the bottom and climb up the mountain to get some exercise. Life in Thailand is never dull.

last year had a fairly bad crash dog ran out Infront of the bike this was August  ... Stitches in mouth ..chin hanging off ..more stitches.. arms legs stitched  plus a lot of bruised parts still pain in my arms loss of use in fingers sometimes have trouble sleeping .back to the hospital again next month they do their best but initial treatment after accident leaves a lot to be desired missed a lot of stuff rushed job ..i didnt choose the hospital where the ambulance took me in fact 2 different ones before i was really concious  but did the best as i said...Soi dogs for you ...hope you are ok now mate!  

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My bud who has lived several places in Thailand and owns 3 bikes of different sizes told me everyone he knows, Thai or not, has been in an accident.

 

I have had two through no fault of my own except I was on the road.

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57 minutes ago, pgrahmm said:

There's shadows in the dark ?

 

There are "street lights" (more of a dim glimmer really).

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1968 Kawasaki 90 - lady pulled out from a cross street, saw me - stopped. I did too when I hit her

1972 Kawasaki 500 - rear tire blowout, drove off a 70 foot cliff, broke LH leg in 3 places. Cast from my waist to tips of my toes for 6 months, below the knee to tips of toes for 3 more

1982 - YZ490 converted to Super Motard - almost duplicate of 1968

More in N. America

Riding in LOS 17 years

2005 - Dyna - passing a minivan when the worlds oldest vigo with 8 people in it pulled out in front of me. Broke the shift lever off with my foot. Transferred paint from the Vigo to the tank of the bike but did not leave a dent - close

Besides low sides due to sand, no more here.

Wood Be A' Touchin'

 

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56 minutes ago, Crossy said:

 

There are "street lights" (more of a dim glimmer really).

sometimes... it is only a silohuette that saves your skin...   

My first even incident of the genre; was back in 1984 in Darwin

 - a <native Australian> drunk as a skunk doing the stagger stagger crawl crawl stagger crawl in the middle lane of the three... y9iw0ndhlqjx.gif

Chateau Marbay-like 'plaggon' half full in arm... on pension pay night

 - all you notice is the eclipsing of a far off street lamp 

 

Edited by Crossy
Removed a potentially offensive term (in wide use but ...)
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I was riding in Lombok Indonesia. Thought I had DONE the hard part in the dirt roads in the south west but going back to the hotel on the main road a truck came towards me and came right over to my side of the road. Came off the bike but was not going that fast. Two ladies picked me up, put some antiseptic and a bandage on my leg, and sent me on my way. Don't think I had insurance in those days. A bit silly. 

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5 minutes ago, tifino said:

it is only a silohuette that saves your skin... 

 

Or causes you to doubt your sanity....

 

Some years ago, before the candle based street lights were installed, I was driving home late in the evening (after work, not after the pub).

In the distance I saw a red flashing light which appeared to be describing a slow left to right arc at maybe 1Hz, UFO perhaps thinks I.

Upon getting closer there was a dark shape associated with the gently swinging light.

The dark shape rapidly morphed into an elephant ambling along in the leftmost lane.

The red flashing light was an LED bicycle rear light which had been rubber-banded on to the beast's tail.

Hence the gentle arc being described by the "UFO".

 

Only in Thailand! (IIRC there had been a govenment directive that all elephants had to carry lights).

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I may have imagined this... but, I’ll go ahead and mention it anyway. 

 

I’ve noticed a difference between riding a Scooter and riding a Bigger bike. 

It could be conformation ‘bias’ but, drivers on Thai roads seems to take more notice and make more allowance when I’m on a ‘bigger bike’ (ADV) compare to riding a scooter... It could be due to having greater road presence, wearing full kit etc and generally being more noticeable on a larger bike compared to the scooters which blend into insignificance... 

 

I noticed a similar thing when driving a large European 4x4 compared to my Wife’s tiny A-Class Merc...  driving the smaller car become hazardous as people were far less willing to ‘give way’ when driving in an assertive manner (which one must in central Bangkok if wishing to get anywhere). 

 

So...  I suspect some accidents may have been avoided while out on my Motorcycle simply because its bigger, has more road presence, wearing a full riding jacket and pants etc could make me stand out more than the average scooter rider... 

 

A facet of this involves ‘money’... i.e. IF someone has a bigger bike they are more likely to be wealthier than the average person a scooter. As we all know, Thai’s respect money more than anything else, thus, the appearance of ’not being a poor scooter rider’ may have an impact on how the subconsciousness takes note when out on the roads.

(just a thought anyway - but there may be something to it).

 

 

 

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Mines was pretty serious and required 3 weeks in ICU.
I've riden my PCX in Bangkok for 8 years and never had as much as a scratch until one morning when I was driving into work and coming to the Asoke intersection. Another moped driver came out of the traffic to my right and just started drifting towards me. I was hedged against the kerb and too late realised he was going to crash into me (not sure if he was on something but it was 0900 in the morning). I broke suddenly and although I missed him crashing into me, the truck that was driving far too close behind me hit me sqaure on and catapulted me into a tree.

I was taken to hospital and 4 litres of blood were pumped out of my right lung, I had lacerations to my stomach and lower intestines, my ankle was a mess of blood and scraped skin and I was bruised from my kneck all the way down my left side. All in all it wasn't pretty.

It took me 6 months to fully recover but even now my ankle looks like it belongs to someone else. I suppose I can count myself lucky that I'm here to tell the tale but it just goes to show that the majority of incidents you will ever find yourself on in Thailand are rarely your fault but rather the fault of some other idiot who puts you in the hospital.

P.S. Both motorcyclists and van driver sped away from the scene, never to be heard from again.

 

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1 hour ago, Crossy said:

 

There are "street lights" (more of a dim glimmer really).

Oh - that 50 shades stuff..... 😋

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15 minutes ago, richard_smith237 said:

I may have imagined this... but, I’ll go ahead and mention it anyway. 

 

I’ve noticed a difference between riding a Scooter and riding a Bigger bike. 

It could be conformation ‘bias’ but, drivers on Thai roads seems to take more notice and make more allowance when I’m on a ‘bigger bike’ (ADV) compare to riding a scooter... It could be due to having greater road presence, wearing full kit etc and generally being more noticeable on a larger bike compared to the scooters which blend into insignificance... 

 

I noticed a similar thing when driving a large European 4x4 compared to my Wife’s tiny A-Class Merc...  driving the smaller car become hazardous as people were far less willing to ‘give way’ when driving in an assertive manner (which one must in central Bangkok if wishing to get anywhere). 

 

So...  I suspect some accidents may have been avoided while out on my Motorcycle simply because its bigger, has more road presence, wearing a full riding jacket and pants etc could make me stand out more than the average scooter rider... 

 

A facet of this involves ‘money’... i.e. IF someone has a bigger bike they are more likely to be wealthier than the average person a scooter. As we all know, Thai’s respect money more than anything else, thus, the appearance of ’not being a poor scooter rider’ may have an impact on how the subconsciousness takes note when out on the roads.

(just a thought anyway - but there may be something to it).

 

 

 

The law of the lug nuts....

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20 minutes ago, richard_smith237 said:

I may have imagined this... but, I’ll go ahead and mention it anyway. 

 

I’ve noticed a difference between riding a Scooter and riding a Bigger bike. 

It could be conformation ‘bias’ but, drivers on Thai roads seems to take more notice and make more allowance when I’m on a ‘bigger bike’ (ADV) compare to riding a scooter... It could be due to having greater road presence, wearing full kit etc and generally being more noticeable on a larger bike compared to the scooters which blend into insignificance... 

 

I noticed a similar thing when driving a large European 4x4 compared to my Wife’s tiny A-Class Merc...  driving the smaller car become hazardous as people were far less willing to ‘give way’ when driving in an assertive manner (which one must in central Bangkok if wishing to get anywhere). 

 

So...  I suspect some accidents may have been avoided while out on my Motorcycle simply because its bigger, has more road presence, wearing a full riding jacket and pants etc could make me stand out more than the average scooter rider... 

 

A facet of this involves ‘money’... i.e. IF someone has a bigger bike they are more likely to be wealthier than the average person a scooter. As we all know, Thai’s respect money more than anything else, thus, the appearance of ’not being a poor scooter rider’ may have an impact on how the subconsciousness takes note when out on the roads.

(just a thought anyway - but there may be something to it).

 

 

 

it's all a Relative bluff...

 - Bigger Bike = the thoughts of Bigger Dent in their fender...

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