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Coffee Machine: French Press. Drip. Metal Pot. Which to use?


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44 minutes ago, KannikaP said:

Then how do you know it is not very good and that you do not like it?

 

I neither said it is not good nor that I don't like it, I said I hope I never will - go to a Starbucks .

 

I hope that helps your comprehension.

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'Best' is in the eye of the beholder. They all serve different purposes.   You had an espresso machine, so in your case the 'Italian style' Mocha pot will probably make something similar. It

I neither said it is not good nor that I don't like it, I said I hope I never will - go to a Starbucks .   I hope that helps your comprehension.

Yes, some new O-rings can do wonders.

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I was faced with a similar issue recently. I like convenience but also rate taste and price highly. Considered the Nepresso machines, but those pod prices are crazy. Considered the moka pot, but as slow as my condo burners are to come up to heat and cleaning the thing everyday wouldn't be convenient to me.

 

So I just went with a fairly inexpensive, 10,000฿ espresso machine for my 2 daily black Americanos. Best coffee ever, IMO.

 

 

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On 4/4/2021 at 9:02 PM, Jan Dietz said:

The traditional filter machine will make a luke-warm black water. Some Americans call this 'coffee'.

Only if one can't figure out how to add in more coffee. For those few miserable sufferers here who aren't Throwing caution to the wind and b u g g e r the diet, consider that filtered coffee is the healthier.

 

The first study to examine links between coffee brewing methods and risks of heart attacks and death has concluded that filtered brew is safest. The research is published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

 

"Our study provides strong and convincing evidence of a link between coffee brewing methods, heart attacks and longevity," said study author Professor Dag S. Thelle of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. "Unfiltered coffee contains substances which increase blood cholesterol. Using a filter removes these and makes heart attacks and premature death less likely."

    --https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/04/200422214101.htm

 

But so much bother, no? Go instant and call that coffee. Cultured Brits, as always, know best; I dunno where they are in this thread:

 

80% of UK households buy instant coffee for in-home consumption, particularly those aged 65 and older

      --https://www.gimokacoffee.com/news/coffee-in-the-uk-infographic.html

 

Add the ol' cream & sugar. Heaven!

 

Edited by BigStar
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fresh beans from a good friend of my wife(medium roast arabica), freshy ground each morning(krups grinder), electrolux drip filter using unbleached paper & just enough water for 2 cups, comes out hot and it is a great way to start the day at home. Still love a good coffee from machine if it is hot(most cafe's only give you warm coffee), french press was good but too much sediment, biggest part is getting the beans right, so many choices but when you get a good one you stick to it

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Despite the machinery you may have, there are still many variables in making a decent cup of coffee - to name a few, the bean, the grind, the dose, the tamp, the group head / boiler temperature, and the pressure.

I nearly bought the semi automatic top of the line Breville, like someone above said it is a fair chunk of change, so I went for something a lot more fun, and rewarding.

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22 hours ago, Susco said:

 

Yeah, I always shake my head when I read the comments of those snobs, and that doesn't restrict to coffee, on the forums.

 

It's all in their head, because a good coffee depends on the ingredients you use, not the appliance

Im no expert of coffee lover but isnt it a bit of both ?

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On 4/5/2021 at 9:37 AM, richard_smith237 said:

 

How do you know its not good if you’ve never tasted it ?

 

Seems like antiestablishment coffee snobbery to me !!! 🤓

 

 

 

I’m guessing most people are a vocally anti-Starbucks couldn’t tell Starbucks double espresso from another... 

 

I've tried it lots and it is garbage.  At best it a place of convenience.

 

People who line up for Starbucks have never tasted good coffee before.  When I travel internationally, I encounter plenty of associates who think SB is great because it is fashionable to do so.  Serious coffee/espresso drinkers go elsewhere.

SB customers have never tasted good coffee made from quality arabica beans to be able to tell the difference from the cheap robusto beans SB uses.  They've only had the SB swill heavily sweetened & creamed to hide the sour taste.

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34 minutes ago, Iron Tongue said:

I've tried it lots and it is garbage.  At best it a place of convenience.

 

People who line up for Starbucks have never tasted good coffee before.  When I travel internationally, I encounter plenty of associates who think SB is great because it is fashionable to do so.  Serious coffee/espresso drinkers go elsewhere.

SB customers have never tasted good coffee made from quality arabica beans to be able to tell the difference from the cheap robusto beans SB uses.  They've only had the SB swill heavily sweetened & creamed to hide the sour taste.

This is so funny.

Starbucks doesn't use Robusta beans.

They use Arabica only. 

Most everyone that knows even a little bit about coffee knows the difference between Robusta and Arabica.

So your post above is totally ridiculous. 

I do agree however that Starbucks is mainly in the business of selling milk and sugar, but if you stick with their filtered coffee, as I do when I go there, it's usually quite decent.

 

Arabica vs Robusta Coffee Beans | Starbucks® Coffee at Home

Quote

 

ARABICA COFFEE VS. ROBUSTA COFFEE BEANS

Why Starbucks Only Buys 100 Percent Arabica Coffee Beans.

 

 

It does feel weird to be defending Starbucks because back in the U.S. I was Peets all the way, but really, I find people just use Starbucks as an easy convenient punching bag and it really does come off as low grade snobbery (sometimes stinking of knee jerk anti-Americanism when coming from non-Americans). Of course long ago, I was into bashing Bill Gates, and now I think he's an international treasure (more Seattle stuff). 

Edited by Jingthing
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Filtered coffee is healthiest. The filter catches a lot of cancer causing particles. You get those anytime you roast something.

Edited by DerbyDan
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On 4/5/2021 at 2:22 PM, onebir said:

Have you tried the metal filter?

After googling the upside down method,naturally all things aeropress started popping up.One was the aeropress world championship (Google it at your peril),they printed the recipe's! Of the top four and all of them used the paperfilters one used two,and they all really gave them a good wash first.just saying. 

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8 hours ago, adammike said:

After googling the upside down method,naturally all things aeropress started popping up.One was the aeropress world championship (Google it at your peril),they printed the recipe's! Of the top four and all of them used the paperfilters one used two,and they all really gave them a good wash first.just saying. 

Actually putting the two filters (both paper or metal over paper) should boost the pressure a bit, but the espresso standard is 8 bar. 6 bar in the cheaper hand-pumped espresso machine works ok though. (I got one  recently & it does make decent espresso, but involves a lot of assembly & cleaning.)

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On 4/5/2021 at 6:43 PM, Jingthing said:

What is the maximum amount of the end result coffee in ounces?

It's almost as much as you want.

Swiss gold is a two piece system with the capacity of about mug size (with milk).

Fill the filter (bottom part) with as much coffee grinds as you want, more for strong, less for week.

Fill the water strainer (top part) with hot water, allow to pass through and refill if larger mug is used.

Two full passes should fill one of those super size mugs, with a little room for milk.

I use soy milk at about 30% to 70% coffee.

One fill of the water strainer will fill a standard mug that has preheated soy milk.

I've not found a better system.!

 

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10 minutes ago, millymoopoo said:

It's almost as much as you want.

Swiss gold is a two piece system with the capacity of about mug size (with milk).

Fill the filter (bottom part) with as much coffee grinds as you want, more for strong, less for week.

Fill the water strainer (top part) with hot water, allow to pass through and refill if larger mug is used.

Two full passes should fill one of those super size mugs, with a little room for milk.

I use soy milk at about 30% to 70% coffee.

One fill of the water strainer will fill a standard mug that has preheated soy milk.

I've not found a better system.!

 

Thanks but that doesn't really answer my question. 

How many ounces of coffee maximum for one pass through?

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On 4/7/2021 at 9:58 AM, Jingthing said:

Yeah. Four minutes is standard. 

I use a French Press and While I like full flavored coffee, I don't like an over-abundance of bitter notes.  I use an extra half measure of coffee and brew for 2 1/2 minutes for the flavor I want.

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14 minutes ago, dddave said:

I like the French Press because it's so easy to control the coffee strength but grounds and a slightly gritty feel are an issue.

I concur with using a coarser grind but I also sift my grind with a fine sifter. , Even with all that, there is usually still some grit.  I never pour the entire pot, always leaving a half-inch or so in the bottom.  

BTW, I had an expensive $60 multi-cup unit purchased in the US.  When the carafe broke, I replaced it with a cheap, B300 unit from Lazada.  I noticed no difference in the results.  Price is no guarantee of quality. 

 

 

I find the unusual design of the oddly little known Rivers brand press that I use allows for a finer grind and sediment making it to the cup less likely. 

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10 minutes ago, dddave said:

I use a French Press and While I like full flavored coffee, I don't like an over-abundance of bitter notes.  I use an extra half measure of coffee and brew for 2 1/2 minutes for the flavor I want.

Well that's the idea really. Tailoring the details to your taste.

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On 4/5/2021 at 4:42 PM, mrfill said:

A vote for the Viet coffee pot here. Buy lots - they're cheap and bend easily...

 

1504041931_2014-02-0211_31_48.thumb.jpg.472efa860cb571c7424812d7328d238a.jpg

 

Couple of years back i worked in very rural Vietnam, there was a brilliant coffee shop on the way from HCMC to where i worked where i bought my beans (mocca), which were dirt cheap but delicious (Vietnamese coffee in Vietnam is so so cheap), and i used a Vietnamese Phin for the time i worked in Vietnam and for quite a period after i came back to Thailand (i worked with a Vietnamese here who would bring Vietnamese coffee beans back for me from his trips home). The Phin worked great and they're 'cheap as chips'.


Nowadays I've reverted back to a French Press for using with the coffee beans i buy here in Thailand.

 

When we go on away trips, as i like to make my own coffee in the morning (hotel breakfast coffee is <deleted>), i grind some beans, put it in small lockable container, and take the virtually unbreakable robust Phin with me.

 

To the guy who is having problems with the water going through the phin too fast or slow, think that's to do with your coffee grind and/or not enough/too much coffee in the phin. 

 

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55 minutes ago, kynikoi said:

Plastic dripper

Filters on Shoppee

Moconna green box

 

Simple, cheap, tidy, delicious for price

 

Mentioned the Dripper before, great invention as so easy to use (I also use the Aeropress and V60)

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1 hour ago, Bredbury Blue said:

 

Couple of years back i worked in very rural Vietnam, there was a brilliant coffee shop on the way from HCMC to where i worked where i bought my beans (mocca), which were dirt cheap but delicious (Vietnamese coffee in Vietnam is so so cheap), and i used a Vietnamese Phin for the time i worked in Vietnam and for quite a period after i came back to Thailand (i worked with a Vietnamese here who would bring Vietnamese coffee beans back for me from his trips home). The Phin worked great and they're 'cheap as chips'.


Nowadays I've reverted back to a French Press for using with the coffee beans i buy here in Thailand.

 

When we go on away trips, as i like to make my own coffee in the morning (hotel breakfast coffee is <deleted>), i grind some beans, put it in small lockable container, and take the virtually unbreakable robust Phin with me.

 

To the guy who is having problems with the water going through the phin too fast or slow, think that's to do with your coffee grind and/or not enough/too much coffee in the phin. 

 

I still have several stainless steel phins from Vietnam and really liked the coffee they could make but only if, as Bradbury Blue says, the grind is just right, and that is not easy to achieve.  More often than not, the water would take so long to pass through that it would cool below the heat level required to brew and the result not so great. 

I do love their simplicity and how easily portable they are.  When traveling, I also used to pack one along.  Anything is better than hotel room Nescafe.

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1 hour ago, JoePai said:

Mentioned the Dripper before, great invention as so easy to use (I also use the Aeropress and V60)

 

French press is great but it's a hassle to clean. Drip is so simple.

 

Viet coffee is drip but why bother with the contraption.

 

Vietnamese coffee is strong but one dimensional. Rubusto bean. Moccona I think also only uses rubusto but they've managed to get a more flavorful and aromatic coffee.

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7 hours ago, Jingthing said:

Thanks but that doesn't really answer my question. 

How many ounces of coffee maximum for one pass through?

I don't know the actual maximum, it's personal choice.

I like strong coffee, so I use 3 tablespoons of grinds in the filter, that's more than normal, the water strainer just sits above them, so I suppose that could be very close to maximum, but there's no reason why you couldn't put more and hold the water strainer up after filling with water.

The purpose of the water strainer is to distribute the water over the grinds evenly.

Filling the filter with grinds and pouring water straight on to them doesn't work.

You could fill the filter with as much grinds as you want, doesn't matter if the strainer is sitting on them, just fill it with water and lift it up, then when the strainer is empty, put it aside and wait for the water to pass through the grinds.

You can actually fill the strainer, let that pass and fill it again if you're using a big mug.

I often refill it and let it pass into another mug for the other half, they say it's no less strong or less flavoursome then a first pass.

Compared to electric/stove top or plunge filters these are way cheaper so it wouldn't be expensive to try, but you'd probably have to do Amazon as I don't know anywhere in Thailand to get them..

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9 minutes ago, millymoopoo said:

I don't know the actual maximum, it's personal choice.

I like strong coffee, so I use 3 tablespoons of grinds in the filter, that's more than normal, the water strainer just sits above them, so I suppose that could be very close to maximum, but there's no reason why you couldn't put more and hold the water strainer up after filling with water.

The purpose of the water strainer is to distribute the water over the grinds evenly.

Filling the filter with grinds and pouring water straight on to them doesn't work.

You could fill the filter with as much grinds as you want, doesn't matter if the strainer is sitting on them, just fill it with water and lift it up, then when the strainer is empty, put it aside and wait for the water to pass through the grinds.

You can actually fill the strainer, let that pass and fill it again if you're using a big mug.

I often refill it and let it pass into another mug for the other half, they say it's no less strong or less flavoursome then a first pass.

Compared to electric/stove top or plunge filters these are way cheaper so it wouldn't be expensive to try, but you'd probably have to do Amazon as I don't know anywhere in Thailand to get them..

I meant the maximum amount of coffee liquid from one pass. Not ground coffee.

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15 minutes ago, kynikoi said:

 

French press is great but it's a hassle to clean. Drip is so simple.

 

Viet coffee is drip but why bother with the contraption.

 

Vietnamese coffee is strong but one dimensional. Rubusto bean. Moccona I think also only uses rubusto but they've managed to get a more flavorful and aromatic coffee.

I don't find my Rivers French press hard to clean at all!

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14 hours ago, Jingthing said:

I meant the maximum amount of coffee liquid from one pass. Not ground coffee.

Sorry misunderstood your question.

The water strainer has a 1 metric cup capacity, 250ml/8.5 oz.

But as I previously indicated, you may add more hot water to the strainer if need be after one pass is completed for filling super sized mugs..

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On 4/5/2021 at 4:42 PM, mrfill said:

A vote for the Viet coffee pot here. Buy lots - they're cheap and bend easily...

 

1504041931_2014-02-0211_31_48.thumb.jpg.472efa860cb571c7424812d7328d238a.jpg

I have been trying to find the small container that fits on a cup that has the grounds, in which there is a screw top so that you can adjust the strength.
Visited Vietnam many years ago and always had this at a local street coffee place.

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For camping I have a fine screened cup that fits inside my mug. Worked great for twenty years of backpacking and camping until my wife decided we needed to drag all the drip coffee drama with us.

 

Marriage

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