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dbrenn

Story Of My Thai Citizenship Application

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What you have to bear in mind is  that Chinese and Indians make up probably well over half the applications. Their governments are likely to take prompt action when an embassy receives a letter from the MoI informing them that one of their nationals has received Thai nationality, which was also a new requirement in 2009.  Same for Koreans, Singaporeans, Malaysians, Japanese et al, although they apply in much smaller numbers.  So it amounts to a good way of getting over governments to do the job for you.

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How long after interview with MOI does it take to find out if you have been successful?

Which one - the one in McDonalds just after meeting SB, or the later committee one

The McDonalds one was about 2 months , but the committee is many many years - about 6 in my case

Technically they don't say "approved", the announcement in the royal gazette is the green light to go ahead

The key point is really taking the oath, as from that point onwards it's mainly waiting for signatures and gazette

You can pretty much say "ok" after the oath

Be prepared for about 9-12 after the oath until you have your ID in your hands

Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

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I had the MOI with the 17 person panel. How long to the oath after this? Thanks for any responses.

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 In my case 

Final interview 29 September 2015
Final review 23 November 2015
Swearing got it 25 April 2016

 

still waiting for gazette,  no idea how much longer. Would love to know if the February lot got it yet. 

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On 6/24/2016 at 7:25 PM, GarryP said:
  On 5/16/2016 at 0:44 PM, dbrenn said:
  On 5/15/2016 at 7:57 PM, GarryP said:

No. It is a typed up copy of the Royal Gazette in which you name appears. I understand but am not absolutely sure that it is something presented to each successful applicant as a formal souvenir.

I was told to keep my copy of the Royal Gazette, as evidence that may be asked for in the future, so it's more than a souvenir.

I still haven't been called to pick this document up yet. Has anyone from the February lot been called to pick up their yet?

I just called SB but they said they have not received our lot yet.

 

I still had not heard anything from SB so tried calling my contact there but the number was no longer in use. I then called the central number and was informed that no such document would be provided. As I already have my Thai ID card there is nothing for the police to provide. However, if I want such a document as a souvenir, they will make inquiries and get back to me. I left my number so will wait and see.

 

  

Edited by GarryP

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1 hour ago, Big Guns said:

I had the MOI with the 17 person panel. How long to the oath after this?

 

In my case, 1 year 10 months 29 days.

 

From Oath to Naturalisation Certificate was 4 months 13 days.

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I thought I'd let people on this thread know about my experience with the MOI interview. Firstly be prepared for a wait. I arrived at 8.30 am and was interviewed at 12pm. Secondly prepare for questions about where you met you're wife, when you came to Thailand, where you've worked and what you do. Also prepare for why you want Thai citizenship (although I wasn't asked this).Thirdly if your Thai is not very strong (like mine) don't worry and don't get stressed by the admin people at the centre who say that you must be able to communicate effectively in Thai. Lastly the interview panel is made up of 17 people, with the desks set out in a U shape with you and your wife at one end and the chairman at the other and everyone is equipped with microphones.  I found this quite daunting.

 

A the moment the admin people were talking about the Royal Gazette in 4 months but I think they mean the oath of allegiance. I hope my experience helps others  who are about to face the MOI interview. My final tip would be to try to relax  as I was a nervous wreck.

 

I felt really sorry for one chap who had to sing the national anthem who'd been back multiple times and failed again

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Congrats with you interview - maybe you are allergic to interviews :)   I did not find it too daunting.

 

Had one guy to my left trying to ask a few smart ass questions, gave him a clear but polite answer which made him shut up with the rest of the committee left with a clear smirk on their face. He was trying to nit pick and sat benign for the rest of the meeting.

 

After a few mins they drifted totally off topic asking my insights to topics which I have expertise in which had nothing to do with my application, and towards the end there was plenty of laughter. I think my case was clear / no brainer, so they chilled out.  

 

So don't over worry ! 

 

 

 

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Ps - plan for about another 1 year before have the ID in your hands - slowwwwww


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect


2 years 3 months 25 days in my case. From DOPA-interview until Thai National ID card.

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9 hours ago, Big Guns said:

I thought I'd let people on this thread know about my experience with the MOI interview. Firstly be prepared for a wait. I arrived at 8.30 am and was interviewed at 12pm. Secondly prepare for questions about where you met you're wife, when you came to Thailand, where you've worked and what you do. Also prepare for why you want Thai citizenship (although I wasn't asked this).Thirdly if your Thai is not very strong (like mine) don't worry and don't get stressed by the admin people at the centre who say that you must be able to communicate effectively in Thai. Lastly the interview panel is made up of 17 people, with the desks set out in a U shape with you and your wife at one end and the chairman at the other and everyone is equipped with microphones.  I found this quite daunting.

 

A the moment the admin people were talking about the Royal Gazette in 4 months but I think they mean the oath of allegiance. I hope my experience helps others  who are about to face the MOI interview. My final tip would be to try to relax  as I was a nervous wreck.

 

I felt really sorry for one chap who had to sing the national anthem who'd been back multiple times and failed again

Well done. Very much our experience.

 

have related this already but after my wife's interview we went down the lift with one of the committee members who left early. She basically said that if they didn't ask any tricky questions then not to worry. 

 

FWIW she interviewed and was announced a citizen 9 months later. All under this government. Realise the process for women is a little different but thought I'd let you know. 

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On 8/30/2016 at 11:08 AM, Big Guns said:

I thought I'd let people on this thread know about my experience with the MOI interview. Firstly be prepared for a wait. I arrived at 8.30 am and was interviewed at 12pm. Secondly prepare for questions about where you met you're wife, when you came to Thailand, where you've worked and what you do. Also prepare for why you want Thai citizenship (although I wasn't asked this).Thirdly if your Thai is not very strong (like mine) don't worry and don't get stressed by the admin people at the centre who say that you must be able to communicate effectively in Thai. Lastly the interview panel is made up of 17 people, with the desks set out in a U shape with you and your wife at one end and the chairman at the other and everyone is equipped with microphones.  I found this quite daunting.

 

A the moment the admin people were talking about the Royal Gazette in 4 months but I think they mean the oath of allegiance. I hope my experience helps others  who are about to face the MOI interview. My final tip would be to try to relax  as I was a nervous wreck.

 

I felt really sorry for one chap who had to sing the national anthem who'd been back multiple times and failed again

 

According to regulations, the interview panel, aka the small committee, is comprised of 15 people but there are others in the room who are not official members of the committee.

 

Apart from the singing, the interview for those who apply under their own steam on the basis of PR instead of being married to a Thai is significantly harder. Obviously you have to do it alone and it took about 15 minutes in my case.  Apart from questions about my life and status in Thailand, I was asked questions about my views on the Thai economy, inflation and the price of gold and relatively difficult stuff like that, although I got the sense it was more because of the nature of my work than an effort to catch me out.  People who are married to foreigners can expect questions about their integration into Thai society and motivation for wanting Thai citizenship, although that was not my case as I already had a Thai wife but we had not been married long enough for me to get exemption from singing etc.

 

Knowledge of the Thai language is required by the Nationality Act but those with Thai wives have been given exemption from that requirement since 2008.  Thus the interview for those married to Thais is only about 5 minutes and your wife is present and allowed to help.  As you mentioned, they are without mercy regarding the singing test for those without Thai spouses.  Most of those that fail the singing usually have bad spoken Thai and oral comprehension too but the singing is probably the acid test that determines whether they get through or not, as it is easy for the committee to agree on pass or fail over that, thus saving them time.

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On 13/8/2559 at 0:54 PM, Arkady said:

The new constitution repeats the clause about Thai citizenship that was in the 2015 draft that got rejected by the NRC. 

 

Section 39  No person of Thai nationality shall be deported or prohibited from entering the Kingdom.
Revocation of Thai nationality acquired by birth of a person shall not be permitted.

 

The first sentence is nothing new.  It has been in the last several constitutions. This is the clause you should quote to those simpleton immigration officers who try to refuse entry on their Thai passports to dual national Thai wives and children on the grounds that they have blank Thai passports issued abroad.  

 

The second sentence has never appeared in a Thai constitution before, nor has there ever been any reference to acquisition or revocation of Thai citizenship.  Since the constitution outranks statutory laws, it clears up the ambiguity in the Nationality Act regarding Thais who naturalise as aliens and the confusion caused by the wording of Section 14 of the Nationality Act which many, including somewhat disingenuously some Interior Ministry officials in the Nationality Section,  have wrongly interpreted as meaning that half Thai children have to surrender their Thai nationality at the age of 20 or risk having it revoked, if they choose to retain foreign nationality.  Actually Section 14 provides the right but not the obligation to renounce Thai citizenship in these circumstances.

 

Interestingly Section 39 of the new constitution also would appear to contradict the Nationality Act which allows for revsocation of citizenship from those who are Thai through birth in the Kingdom to two foreign parents (since 1972 both parents must have permanent residence at the time of birth).  These Thais were traditionally the main targets for revocation of Thai citizenship and have accounted for nearly 100% of cases announced in the Royal Gazette to my knowledge. The only other revocation announcements I have seen have been of women who adopted their husbands' Thai nationality under Section 9 of the Nationality Act.  For them the only grounds for revocation are lying in the original application or offences against morality (only seen following conviction of a serious offence such as drug trafficking in Thailand or overseas).   That will leave naturalised Thais now as the only citizens that can lose their Thai nationality for maintaining excessive interest (undefined) in their former nationality or residing abroad for 5 years without maintaining residence in the Kingdom in addition to lying in their application or for offences against morality.  Obviously the original purpose of this measure was to control the vast numbers of Chinese immigrants who obtained Thai nationality through birth in Thailand to Chinese parents and maintained Chinese nationality and cultural identity (before China banned dual nationality in the 70s).   Many Chinese Thais lost their Thai citizenship for spending more than 5 years in China and in the Cold War, many found themselves separated from family in Thailand for 30 years,  as they were denied visas as well.  These revocations involving Chinese and Indian names, as well as one Brit, have continued until the late 2000s. 

 

There is no recorded case of which I am aware of a naturalised Thai or a Thai naturalised as an alien losing their Thai nationality involuntarily since 1965.  Prior to the 1965 Nationality Act prohibitions on dual citizenship were more explicit and there were cases of Thais having their citizenship revoked for naturalising as aliens, not to mention the most common cause which used to be women who married aliens and lost their Thai nationality automatically (as also happen in the UK, US and other Western countries).  Naturalised Thais used to often surrender their Thai citizenship voluntarily in order to recover their original nationalities when they returned home to counties like the UK that used to strictly prohibit dual nationality (until 1948 in the case of the UK).

Hard to keep track; as they change the constitution every five years or so.

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