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Story Of My Thai Citizenship Application


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On 07/11/2017 at 11:03 AM, Arkady said:

A big concern for any Brit thinking of applying ought to be getting the embassy to do the declaration of intent. If you are already qualified, I would not delay further in applying.  You don't want to rock up to the embassy only to be told, "Oh, I'm sorry, you were given the wrong information. We don't do that any more."  If the FCO decides it is no longer appropriate, they will not care that that means British people no longer have the option of applying for Thai nationality.  You will just be left writing to your MP in the UK to complain.

At what stage do you qualify for getting this document? Have they ever refused it to anyone? Do you think they'd hold a grudge against me if I made a formal complaint about my recent bad treatment?

I'm hoping to apply for citizenship when I get my birth certificate translated and legalized, hopefully by the end of the year.

 

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Hi All, For those who are interested, the application process for Thai Citizenship in my case went as follows: Late 2003 - Picked up the checklist from the Police Headquarters on Rama 1 Road Janu

Loads of names published in the RG today and I am one them! Exactly 3 months to the day since taking the oath 😀

Not sure why you chose to go through all this humiliation ! But you obviously had your reasons ! If you are from Africa or the Indian Sub-Continent or such, then Thai citizenship may be regarded as u

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1 hour ago, Neeranam said:

At what stage do you qualify for getting this document? Have they ever refused it to anyone? Do you think they'd hold a grudge against me if I made a formal complaint about my recent bad treatment?

I'm hoping to apply for citizenship when I get my birth certificate translated and legalized, hopefully by the end of the year.

 

I had to submit it with all the other documents prior to finalising the application with SB.  I don't think the embassy will hold it against you, if you complain.  But I would frame it in a constructive way, e.g. you hesitate to complain but would like to suggest the consulate add some processes to avoid making people fly to Bangkok to avail themselves of notarial services that are no longer provided by explaining to the local staff clearly exactly what services are provided and which are not.   Best to address it to the ambassador, Mr Brian Davidson, so it can filter down the pipe.  

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34 minutes ago, Arkady said:

I had to submit it with all the other documents prior to finalising the application with SB.  I don't think the embassy will hold it against you, if you complain.  But I would frame it in a constructive way, e.g. you hesitate to complain but would like to suggest the consulate add some processes to avoid making people fly to Bangkok to avail themselves of notarial services that are no longer provided by explaining to the local staff clearly exactly what services are provided and which are not.   Best to address it to the ambassador, Mr Brian Davidson, so it can filter down the pipe.  

I haven't been asked for this document for the application process.

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1 hour ago, GabbaGabbaHey said:

This is probably because you didn't do the interview day yet (at that time, you'll receive letters and two of them are for your embassy).

 

What does the letter to embassies look like these days?  When I applied I was told to get the declaration of intent without any letter to the embassy and was unsuccessful at my first attempt because the local officer refused to do it.  When I was completing the application process with SB they gave me a copy of a letter they had sent to the embassy.  It was all in Thai and was a very lengthy and tedious piece of offialese which included, among other things, the entire Nationality Act.  Somewhere embedded in the text was a paragraph about the declaration of intent and that they would be hearing from them again to confirm that nationality has been granted. I am sure that a local consular officer glazed over after scanning the first few paras and it was rapidly dropped in the circular filing basket, as, no doubt, was the confirmation letter five years later.   Have they at least managed to translate the letter into English yet?

 

 

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I am so happy all this is behind me now. I don't even recall presenting a letter to the Embassy. I simply went to the Embassy, wrote out my declaration (using standard wording provided by Arkady) and had it endorsed by the British Vice Consul. I then translated the document myself and had a translation office certify the translation (to save costs). It was then certified by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. That was in June 2012.  

 

I did not even have my qualifications certified (not that they were anything to be proud of). I just translated them and had the translations certified by a translator.

 

I don't mean to imply that it was a cake walk for me as it wasn't. However, it  does seem that everything is getting more complex and involves so much more running around to meet certification requirements.    

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15 minutes ago, MrPatrickThai said:

This is not necessary as a translation office can't certify it. You can just take it to the MoFA. 

The translation office stamps to certify that it is a good translation done by them.  For most applications you need this with the telephone number of the translator on the stamp.  I think MoFA needs this too but I never tried to give them one without it.

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1 hour ago, Arkady said:

The translation office stamps to certify that it is a good translation done by them.  For most applications you need this with the telephone number of the translator on the stamp.  I think MoFA needs this too but I never tried to give them one without it.

There is no need for a stamp. There is no certifying body for translators in Thailand, i.e anyone could buy their own stamp. This stamp doesn't even mean an accurate translation, and can often be refused as incorrectly translated at the MoFA. Some places, however, will accept the stamp of a well-known translation office, without the need to go to MoFA.

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9 hours ago, Arkady said:

 

What does the letter to embassies look like these days?  When I applied I was told to get the declaration of intent without any letter to the embassy and was unsuccessful at my first attempt because the local officer refused to do it.  When I was completing the application process with SB they gave me a copy of a letter they had sent to the embassy.  It was all in Thai and was a very lengthy and tedious piece of offialese which included, among other things, the entire Nationality Act.  Somewhere embedded in the text was a paragraph about the declaration of intent and that they would be hearing from them again to confirm that nationality has been granted. I am sure that a local consular officer glazed over after scanning the first few paras and it was rapidly dropped in the circular filing basket, as, no doubt, was the confirmation letter five years later.   Have they at least managed to translate the letter into English yet?

 

 

Both letters were in Thai language, one single page for each. There was no extensive information of the nationality act in it, but a couple of paragraphs who specified "according to the citizenship law number...".

The first letter was asking for 

- Certification that my passport is genuine (SB added a copy of it they had stamped with Thai indications - a format which would be hard to reuse by any embassy I guess, mine could not)
- Certification of no criminal offense in my country
The second letter was asking the embassy to produce a certificate of my intention to renounce my original nationality once I would be granted Thai nationality.

 

The embassy employee just opened the letters, passed it to someone who could read Thai to get a general idea of the subject (probably "naturalization"), and told me they would proceed exactly as they did with the guy preceding me with similar letters: I left with a certified true copy of my passport and a guideline to request my no criminal offense certificate online -as one can do in my country- which document I had translated and legalized later on.

Eventually I was handed back the letters at the embassy since they told me they would do nothing with them.
 

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8 hours ago, MrPatrickThai said:

There is no need for a stamp. There is no certifying body for translators in Thailand, i.e anyone could buy their own stamp. This stamp doesn't even mean an accurate translation, and can often be refused as incorrectly translated at the MoFA. Some places, however, will accept the stamp of a well-known translation office, without the need to go to MoFA.

All translation shops seem to put this stamp on their work automatically.  Definitely it doesn't mean it's a good translation and most of the translation shops use freelance translators with rather poor English which is very evident, if you need a translation from Thai to English. Some of it is close to gibberish but it still gets the shop's stamp of approval and most of it gets through MoFA as well, since the English of the MoFA translation checkers is at about the same level.   

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2 hours ago, GabbaGabbaHey said:

Both letters were in Thai language, one single page for each. There was no extensive information of the nationality act in it, but a couple of paragraphs who specified "according to the citizenship law number...".

The first letter was asking for 

- Certification that my passport is genuine (SB added a copy of it they had stamped with Thai indications - a format which would be hard to reuse by any embassy I guess, mine could not)
- Certification of no criminal offense in my country
The second letter was asking the embassy to produce a certificate of my intention to renounce my original nationality once I would be granted Thai nationality.

 

The embassy employee just opened the letters, passed it to someone who could read Thai to get a general idea of the subject (probably "naturalization"), and told me they would proceed exactly as they did with the guy preceding me with similar letters: I left with a certified true copy of my passport and a guideline to request my no criminal offense certificate online -as one can do in my country- which document I had translated and legalized later on.

Eventually I was handed back the letters at the embassy since they told me they would do nothing with them.
 

Sounds like they have rationalised the letters they produce for embassies.  What you describe makes a lot more sense than just sending a long, boring letter out of the blue about someone applying for citizenship after he has already obtained the necessary documents from the embassy, as in my case.  

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11 hours ago, GabbaGabbaHey said:

Both letters were in Thai language, one single page for each. There was no extensive information of the nationality act in it, but a couple of paragraphs who specified "according to the citizenship law number...".

The first letter was asking for 

- Certification that my passport is genuine (SB added a copy of it they had stamped with Thai indications - a format which would be hard to reuse by any embassy I guess, mine could not)
- Certification of no criminal offense in my country
The second letter was asking the embassy to produce a certificate of my intention to renounce my original nationality once I would be granted Thai nationality.

 

The embassy employee just opened the letters, passed it to someone who could read Thai to get a general idea of the subject (probably "naturalization"), and told me they would proceed exactly as they did with the guy preceding me with similar letters: I left with a certified true copy of my passport and a guideline to request my no criminal offense certificate online -as one can do in my country- which document I had translated and legalized later on.

Eventually I was handed back the letters at the embassy since they told me they would do nothing with them.
 

Can you confirm - the declaration of intent to renounce British/US etc citizenship is in Thai?

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2 hours ago, MrPatrickThai said:

Can you confirm - the declaration of intent to renounce British/US etc citizenship is in Thai?

I wrote my Declaration in English. 

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