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Story Of My Thai Citizenship Application


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In interesting group.

Michael David Selby, age 59. Director of Minor Corporation PCL, former director of Rajdamri Hotel PCL, SCB Life Assurance PCL, Christiani & Nielsen, Nok Air, and -- um -- the Crown Property Bureau. Applied for PR in 2004 and received it in 2005.

Duncan Webb. Executive with the Amari Group (and its parent company, Onyx Hospitality Group) since 1992. Currently holds the position of Chief Marketing Officer.

Yosef Chaim Kantor, Rabbi and Chief Executive of the Chabad organization in Thailand.

James Dallas Gerald (phonetic). I haven't been able to locate any web mentions of him.

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Hi All, For those who are interested, the application process for Thai Citizenship in my case went as follows: Late 2003 - Picked up the checklist from the Police Headquarters on Rama 1 Road Janu

Loads of names published in the RG today and I am one them! Exactly 3 months to the day since taking the oath 😀

Not sure why you chose to go through all this humiliation ! But you obviously had your reasons ! If you are from Africa or the Indian Sub-Continent or such, then Thai citizenship may be regarded as u

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In interesting group.

Michael David Selby, age 59. Director of Minor Corporation PCL, former director of Rajdamri Hotel PCL, SCB Life Assurance PCL, Christiani & Nielsen, Nok Air, and -- um -- the Crown Property Bureau. Applied for PR in 2004 and received it in 2005.out

Duncan Webb. Executive with the Amari Group (and its parent company, Onyx Hospitality Group) since 1992. Currently holds the position of Chief Marketing Officer.

Yosef Chaim Kantor, Rabbi and Chief Executive of the Chabad organization in Thailand.

James Dallas Gerald (phonetic). I haven't been able to locate any web mentions of him.

There's nothing interesting about those people. More interesting is the guy that named himself after a football team - Mr Kwok Man U

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In interesting group.

Michael David Selby, age 59. Director of Minor Corporation PCL, former director of Rajdamri Hotel PCL, SCB Life Assurance PCL, Christiani & Nielsen, Nok Air, and -- um -- the Crown Property Bureau. Applied for PR in 2004 and received it in 2005.out

Duncan Webb. Executive with the Amari Group (and its parent company, Onyx Hospitality Group) since 1992. Currently holds the position of Chief Marketing Officer.

Yosef Chaim Kantor, Rabbi and Chief Executive of the Chabad organization in Thailand.

James Dallas Gerald (phonetic). I haven't been able to locate any web mentions of him.

There's nothing interesting about those people. More interesting is the guy that named himself after a football team - Mr Kwok Man U

LOL. Yes, what about the 22 names on the list?

Most of them sound Chinese like Khun Man U with a couple of Indian Subcontinentals and a Japanese name. I would guess that most are running their own SME businesses.

This was obviously a batch initially approved by Yongyuth as IM. No sign of any signed by Charupong yet.

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In interesting group.

Michael David Selby, age 59. Director of Minor Corporation PCL, former director of Rajdamri Hotel PCL, SCB Life Assurance PCL, Christiani & Nielsen, Nok Air, and -- um -- the Crown Property Bureau. Applied for PR in 2004 and received it in 2005.out

Duncan Webb. Executive with the Amari Group (and its parent company, Onyx Hospitality Group) since 1992. Currently holds the position of Chief Marketing Officer.

Yosef Chaim Kantor, Rabbi and Chief Executive of the Chabad organization in Thailand.

James Dallas Gerald (phonetic). I haven't been able to locate any web mentions of him.

There's nothing interesting about those people. More interesting is the guy that named himself after a football team - Mr Kwok Man U

LOL. Yes, what about the 22 names on the list?

Most of them sound Chinese like Khun Man U with a couple of Indian Subcontinentals and a Japanese name. I would guess that most are running their own SME businesses.

This was obviously a batch initially approved by Yongyuth as IM. No sign of any signed by Charupong yet.

And unusual that all of them except one are male.

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I'd expect most to be male,

Far more men come to Thailand, take Thai wives, and settle down, than women do with local men.

This list actually includes two women, a Mrs Chun and a Miss Chun with the same Thai spelling. Although they have different registered addresses, they are probably mother and daughter. If so, Miss Chun would have applied under Section 12 which allows minor children to apply for naturalisation simultaneously with a parent.

This is a list of approvals of people who applied for naturalisation under Section 10. Remember that women with Thai husbands don't apply for naturalisation. They apply to adopt the Thai nationality of their husbands under Section 9 with less stringent criteria and fewer ways to lose their Thai nationality once they've got it. Their approvals are announced one by one and not mixed up with naturalisation announcements. In 2012 approvals of women adopting hubby's Thai nationality outnumbered naturalisations by more than two to one, although this was unusual. There will likely be a lot more males who applied under Sections 10 and 11 (as amended in 2008) based on marriage to a Thai being naturalised in future but so far most of these have not even been interviewed yet.

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In interesting group.

Michael David Selby, age 59. Director of Minor Corporation PCL, former director of Rajdamri Hotel PCL, SCB Life Assurance PCL, Christiani & Nielsen, Nok Air, and -- um -- the Crown Property Bureau. Applied for PR in 2004 and received it in 2005.out

Duncan Webb. Executive with the Amari Group (and its parent company, Onyx Hospitality Group) since 1992. Currently holds the position of Chief Marketing Officer.

Yosef Chaim Kantor, Rabbi and Chief Executive of the Chabad organization in Thailand.

James Dallas Gerald (phonetic). I haven't been able to locate any web mentions of him.

There's nothing interesting about those people. More interesting is the guy that named himself after a football team - Mr Kwok Man U

LOL. Yes, what about the 22 names on the list?

Most of them sound Chinese like Khun Man U with a couple of Indian Subcontinentals and a Japanese name. I would guess that most are running their own SME businesses.

This was obviously a batch initially approved by Yongyuth as IM. No sign of any signed by Charupong yet.

Good work Arkady, keep it up, would like to know the opinion of members if we all together go to different media channels and ask them to do favour for us in this regard as we all know there are steps to do things but this is unusually, unclear delay, and this is a big question about the efficiency and proficiency of Ministry of Interior and its employee that they need this much time(approx. 5 to 10 years) to decide whether a candidate is suitable for Thai citizenship or not, during this period of time candidate and the country can loose and loosing the opportunity as there are many potential candidates that can be very useful and can make name of this country. Time has arrived to do something to change things as deaf ears need a bang. What all of you thinks? This is for everyone who would like to be Thai Citizen and would like to participate in the development of this country.

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As well-intentioned as your campaign is, it is destined to futility. It's not just the Ministry that takes time...it's getting the signature of the King as well. And good luck trying to rush him.

In any case, mine came through three years after application. I don't feel that to be an inordinate amount of time to wait for something so valuable.

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As well-intentioned as your campaign is, it is destined to futility. It's not just the Ministry that takes time...it's getting the signature of the King as well. And good luck trying to rush him.

In any case, mine came through three years after application. I don't feel that to be an inordinate amount of time to wait for something so valuable.

It's not taking more than 3 to 4 months getting the signature of the King if you gone through the process after the approval. The main thing is to get through out of MOI.

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As well-intentioned as your campaign is, it is destined to futility. It's not just the Ministry that takes time...it's getting the signature of the King as well. And good luck trying to rush him.

In any case, mine came through three years after application. I don't feel that to be an inordinate amount of time to wait for something so valuable.

It's not taking more than 3 to 4 months getting the signature of the King if you gone through the process after the approval. The main thing is to get through out of MOI.

If I remember correctly, it took around 9 months after receiving approval from the MOI for mine to be signed off on by HM and proceed to be published in the gazette.

These things take time.

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As well-intentioned as your campaign is, it is destined to futility. It's not just the Ministry that takes time...it's getting the signature of the King as well. And good luck trying to rush him.

In any case, mine came through three years after application. I don't feel that to be an inordinate amount of time to wait for something so valuable.

It's not taking more than 3 to 4 months getting the signature of the King if you gone through the process after the approval. The main thing is to get through out of MOI.

If I remember correctly, it took around 9 months after receiving approval from the MOI for mine to be signed off on by HM and proceed to be published in the gazette.

These things take time.

Thanks, NewlyMintedThai to give an answer, it just took 9 months not many years as taking by MOI now. Thanks again for the answer by yourself.

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As well-intentioned as your campaign is, it is destined to futility. It's not just the Ministry that takes time...it's getting the signature of the King as well. And good luck trying to rush him.

In any case, mine came through three years after application. I don't feel that to be an inordinate amount of time to wait for something so valuable.

It's not taking more than 3 to 4 months getting the signature of the King if you gone through the process after the approval. The main thing is to get through out of MOI.

If I remember correctly, it took around 9 months after receiving approval from the MOI for mine to be signed off on by HM and proceed to be published in the gazette.

These things take time.

Thanks, NewlyMintedThai to give an answer, it just took 9 months not many years as taking by MOI now. Thanks again for the answer by yourself.

I was unaware that things are taking longer now than in the past. My experience was just 2.5 years ago.

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As well-intentioned as your campaign is, it is destined to futility. It's not just the Ministry that takes time...it's getting the signature of the King as well. And good luck trying to rush him.

In any case, mine came through three years after application. I don't feel that to be an inordinate amount of time to wait for something so valuable.

It's not taking more than 3 to 4 months getting the signature of the King if you gone through the process after the approval. The main thing is to get through out of MOI.

If I remember correctly, it took around 9 months after receiving approval from the MOI for mine to be signed off on by HM and proceed to be published in the gazette.

These things take time.

Thanks, NewlyMintedThai to give an answer, it just took 9 months not many years as taking by MOI now. Thanks again for the answer by yourself.

I was unaware that things are taking longer now than in the past. My experience was just 2.5 years ago.

Something does seem to have happened fairly recently to slow the process to a snail's pace for most applicants. Indeed SB has said off the record that most names coming up for the MoI interview recently were from applications filed 4 to 5 years ago. After that there is no telling how long the process is going to take. I have come across several people waiting for the IM's approval 3 or more years after the MoI interview. On the other hand a very small number of people I am told (without being able to verify this independently) are getting interviewed within 6 months and even getting their ID cards within a year after application. SB is open about the fact the right connections can play a significant role here.

The issue is certainly not HMK's approval time which is fairly predictable and seems not subject to inordinate delays. Neither is it the time taken by SB to process applications through various departments in the vetting procedures and forward them to the MoI. This is very efficient and takes only 2 to 4 months. Even though some departments can't be bothered with citizen applications, SB chivvies them up and gets the signatures and stamps in on time. The problem lies in the MoI and the processes there and the IM. The interviewing is clearly a bottleneck. A few years ago they started interviewing several applicants simultaneously at different tables and took a whole day over interviews. Recently they have reverted to interviewing applicants separately in front of the whole sub-committee, as previously. They also now limit the numbers per batch more than before, so it doesn't drag on so long. I believe the committee is fairly diligent and thorough about their work and don't want to rush interviews which can sometimes take up to half an hour. They try to give a little extra time to applicants who are not so strong in spoken Thai so as to give them a better chance. The sub-committee has 15 standing members or their alternates from various government agencies, as specified in the ministerial regulations, and all must be represented. The MoI tries to convene the sub-committee monthly but this is not always possible, since one agency being unable to provide an alternate automatically results in the cancellation of that month's meeting. Following the interviews the applications have to be approved by the main committee that is specified in the Nationality Act and chaired by the permanent secretary. I think this committee only meets 2 or 3 times a year. I don't know how many applications are considered in each batch. Interviews are not required at this stage but the same committee has to consider all citizenship applications, including the hundreds of applications annually from minorities and displaced Thais, and it also considers PR applications. Then the IM has to sign and he may decide take months, years or never bother to sign any at all before his time is up.

Can this changed? Yes. MoI officials say it is entirely up to the IM. In the past some IMs have implemented a policy that most applications should be approved within, say 3 years, and all the officials and agencies involved have been obliged to cooperate to ensure they are not causing delays and the IM has of course signed promptly. If the IM is disinterested, there is no incentive for anyone else to try to speed things up, since the policy must come from the top. When considering the process within the IM you have to bear in mind that the vast majority of their work involves minorities and displaced Thais applying for naturalisation (the latter group particularly after the long awaited 2012 Nationality Act made special provisions for displaced Thais). The staff in the MoI nationality section are fielding calls all day long from people in these categories interested in applying.

Can applicants do anything about it? Yes, but it is very sensitive and needs to be handled carefully. As NMT points out, complaints made in the wrong way are likely to result in a response that it is disrespectful to HMK, although we know that he is not holding up the process. MoI officials also like to produce the argument that Thailand could be in danger of being overrun and losing its quintessential Thainess which certainly resonates with ordinary citizens. Personally I think that the issue needs to be bundled with PR, WPs and regular visa issues that need to be streamlined to facilitate FDI which the government is very keen to promote and taken up by foreign chambers of commerce and the BoI. I was told that the BoI had been pushing hard behind the scenes about PR before the previous IM signed off on the backlog of PR applications. The line should not be making citizenship easier, since that is enshrined in the Nationality Act which is the prerogative of Parliament. As with PR, It should simply be implementing existing laws and regulations more efficiently and setting a clear timeline, say 2 years up to IM approval for citizenship which we know they can do if they want to, so that applicants know where they stand and can plan their lives accordingly.

Edited by Arkady
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As well-intentioned as your campaign is, it is destined to futility. It's not just the Ministry that takes time...it's getting the signature of the King as well. And good luck trying to rush him.

In any case, mine came through three years after application. I don't feel that to be an inordinate amount of time to wait for something so valuable.

It's not taking more than 3 to 4 months getting the signature of the King if you gone through the process after the approval. The main thing is to get through out of MOI.

If I remember correctly, it took around 9 months after receiving approval from the MOI for mine to be signed off on by HM and proceed to be published in the gazette.

These things take time.

Thanks, NewlyMintedThai to give an answer, it just took 9 months not many years as taking by MOI now. Thanks again for the answer by yourself.

I was unaware that things are taking longer now than in the past. My experience was just 2.5 years ago.

Something does seem to have happened fairly recently to slow the process to a snail's pace for most applicants. Indeed SB has said off the record that most names coming up for the MoI interview recently were from applications filed 4 to 5 years ago. After that there is no telling how long the process is going to take. I have come across several people waiting for the IM's approval 3 or more years after the MoI interview. On the other hand a very small number of people I am told (without being able to verify this independently) are getting interviewed within 6 months and even getting their ID cards within a year after application. SB is open about the fact the right connections can play a significant role here.

The issue is certainly not HMK's approval time which is fairly predictable and seems not subject to inordinate delays. Neither is it the time taken by SB to process applications through various departments in the vetting procedures and forward them to the MoI. This is very efficient and takes only 2 to 4 months. Even though some departments can't be bothered with citizen applications, SB chivvies them up and gets the signatures and stamps in on time. The problem lies in the MoI and the processes there and the IM. The interviewing is clearly a bottleneck. A few years ago they started interviewing several applicants simultaneously at different tables and took a whole day over interviews. Recently they have reverted to interviewing applicants separately in front of the whole sub-committee, as previously. They also now limit the numbers per batch more than before, so it doesn't drag on so long. I believe the committee is fairly diligent and thorough about their work and don't want to rush interviews which can sometimes take up to half an hour. They try to give a little extra time to applicants who are not so strong in spoken Thai so as to give them a better chance. The sub-committee has 15 standing members or their alternates from various government agencies, as specified in the ministerial regulations, and all must be represented. The MoI tries to convene the sub-committee monthly but this is not always possible, since one agency being unable to provide an alternate automatically results in the cancellation of that month's meeting. Following the interviews the applications have to be approved by the main committee that is specified in the Nationality Act and chaired by the permanent secretary. I think this committee only meets 2 or 3 times a year. I don't know how many applications are considered in each batch. Interviews are not required at this stage but the same committee has to consider all citizenship applications, including the hundreds of applications annually from minorities and displaced Thais, and it also considers PR applications. Then the IM has to sign and he may decide take months, years or never bother to sign any at all before his time is up.

Can this changed? Yes. MoI officials say it is entirely up to the IM. In the past some IMs have implemented a policy that most applications should be approved within, say 3 years, and all the officials and agencies involved have been obliged to cooperate to ensure they are not causing delays and the IM has of course signed promptly. If the IM is disinterested, there is no incentive for anyone else to try to speed things up, since the policy must come from the top. When considering the process within the IM you have to bear in mind that the vast majority of their work involves minorities and displaced Thais applying for naturalisation (the latter group particularly after the long awaited 2012 Nationality Act made special provisions for displaced Thais). The staff in the MoI nationality section are fielding calls all day long from people in these categories interested in applying.

Can applicants do anything about it? Yes, but it is very sensitive and needs to be handled carefully. As NMT points out, complaints made in the wrong way are likely to result in a response that it is disrespectful to HMK, although we know that he is not holding up the process. MoI officials also like to produce the argument that Thailand could be in danger of being overrun and losing its quintessential Thainess which certainly resonates with ordinary citizens. Personally I think that the issue needs to be bundled with PR, WPs and regular visa issues that need to be streamlined to facilitate FDI which the government is very keen to promote and taken up by foreign chambers of commerce and the BoI. I was told that the BoI had been pushing hard behind the scenes about PR before the previous IM signed off on the backlog of PR applications. The line should not be making citizenship easier, since that is enshrined in the Nationality Act which is the prerogative of Parliament. As with PR, It should simply be implementing existing laws and regulations more efficiently and setting a clear timeline, say 2 years up to IM approval for citizenship which we know they can do if they want to, so that applicants know where they stand and can plan their lives accordingly.

If Interior Minister (IM) thinks politically and with far sightedness then he can think that the families of the applicants would also be happy with him and his political party and will support him and his party to give their vote in election, IM can calculate the numbers of vote with each applicant's family and there are hundreds of applicants waiting, EVERY VOTE COUNTS AND CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE, EVEN ONE VOTE CAN MAKE YOU LOST.

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"If Interior Minister (IM) thinks politically and with far sightedness then he can think that the families of the applicants would also be happy with him and his political party and will support him and his party to give their vote in election, IM can calculate the numbers of vote with each applicant's family and there are hundreds of applicants waiting, EVERY VOTE COUNTS AND CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE, EVEN ONE VOTE CAN MAKE YOU LOST."

You are right, although of course newly naturalised Thais can only vote after five years. This type of thinking does exist to a certain extent, spurred by NGOs, but has been largely directed in recent years towards the issues of minorities and displaced Thais. As a result of NGO activism the 2008 Act redressed some of the evils of the 1971 Revolutionary Decree that retroactively stripped citizenship from those born in Thailand to alien parents who weren't both PRs at the time, while the 2012 Act made it easier for displaced Thais in border area to become proper Thais. With necessary follow up pressure from the NGOs these legal changes have accounted for hundreds of en bloc naturalisations since 2008. I think that ministers and ministry officials feel they are doing their popularist bit by naturalising these people who look and sound exactly like other Thais and are unlikely to cause resentment in other Thais.

Most of those who are not stateless, getting naturalised by the route that we all apply through, are currently still largely foreign men with foreign wives with a trickle of men with Thai wives who applied under the 2008 Section 11 exemption starting to seep through and the overall numbers of non-stateless applicants are quite small. It is hard to see any political/ popularist benefit from publicly fast tracking naturalisations of this group and it is more likely to back fire by causing resentment in other Thais. That is why I say it would be better to treat it as something that aids foreign direct investment and attraction of talent by bundling it up with issues like PR and WPs and lesser restrictions on foreign businesses.

Edited by Arkady
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Are there any experiences that MOI telephoned to applicant and questioning, interviewing (indirectly) or checking the applicant's status as written in application for naturalisation before interview or before giving permission to be Thai citizen?

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Are there any experiences that MOI telephoned to applicant and questioning, interviewing (indirectly) or checking the applicant's status as written in application for naturalisation before interview or before giving permission to be Thai citizen?

Yes, I got a call on my mobile from the MoI before interview enquiring about a document which fortunately I was able to deal with to their satisfaction. I think it is unlikely they would actually interview applicants on the phone, since they get the chance to do that in the formal interviews at the MoI in the appropriate sub-committee of 15 representatives format, as prescribed in the regulations. The checking of your status as declared in the application form is supposed to be done by the NIA as part of the vetting process before your file is sent to the MoI by SB - that is the guy who calls to invite you to an interview at Micky D in Ratchprasong. The MoI's role is to check the documents in your file to make sure you are fully qualified according to the law and regulations and make a subjective assessment of your suitability for Thai citizenship at interview, including your Thai language proficiency and singing abilities (if not married to a Thai).

In any case, it is advisable to field all calls from strange numbers during the entire period of your application. You never know when you might suddenly find yourself talking to a senior civil servant at the MoI. Once you've got your ID card you can give unidentified callers the red button!

Edited by Arkady
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Are there any experiences that MOI telephoned to applicant and questioning, interviewing (indirectly) or checking the applicant's status as written in application for naturalisation before interview or before giving permission to be Thai citizen?

Yes, I got a call on my mobile from the MoI before interview enquiring about a document which fortunately I was able to deal with to their satisfaction. I think it is unlikely they would actually interview applicants on the phone, since they get the chance to do that in the formal interviews at the MoI in the appropriate sub-committee of 15 representatives format, as prescribed in the regulations. The checking of your status as declared in the application form is supposed to be done by the NIA as part of the vetting process before your file is sent to the MoI by SB - that is the guy who calls to invite you to an interview at Micky D in Ratchprasong. The MoI's role is to check the documents in your file to make sure you are fully qualified according to the law and regulations and make a subjective assessment of your suitability for Thai citizenship at interview, including your Thai language proficiency and singing abilities (if not married to a Thai).

In any case, it is advisable to field all calls from strange numbers during the entire period of your application. You never know when you might suddenly find yourself talking to a senior civil servant at the MoI. Once you've got your ID card you can give unidentified callers the red button!

Thanks Arkady, actually I got call also from MOI and felt like they are rechecking the status, circumstances asking some questions and make sure that I am the suitable applicant to call for an interview. All conversation was in Thai language. Hope would be having an interview soon at MOI.

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Not sure why you chose to go through all this humiliation ! But you obviously had your reasons !

If you are from Africa or the Indian Sub-Continent or such, then Thai citizenship may be regarded as useful.

But you kept schtuum on this.

But otherwise ... Why bother ?

1. You can buy land ... Ok.

2. You can drive a Tuk Tuk ... Yea Ok I guess.

3. Entry to the Grand Palace ... Ok if you go every weekend.

4. You can own a business ... Mmmm.

5. No comment.

6. So Bt 1,900 a year is a problem for you ?

7. :whistling:

8. Ok.

9. Sounds like you are on the Lam.

10. Why would you want to vote ?.

Naka.

in additions as stated; you attract Thai tax.

If working in Thailand; for any company; you pay less tax to send funds out of Thailand than if you paid Thai tax as a citizen.

I've worked direct; and funds sent out are far less.

Why not create a comp;any/ Farang-Thai if you want to start a busines ?

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n additions as stated; you attract Thai tax.

If working in Thailand; for any company; you pay less tax to send funds out of Thailand than if you paid Thai tax as a citizen.

I've worked direct; and funds sent out are far less.

Why not create a comp;any/ Farang-Thai if you want to start a busines ?

I'm not quite sure what your question is but there is no difference in the tax treatment of Thais and foreigners under the Thai Revenue Code. Anyone who is in Thailand for more than 6 months in a tax year is liable to Thai tax regardless of their nationality. All tax residents pay tax on income arising in Thailand and income arising abroad, if the latter is remitted to Thailand within 12 months.

Banks charge remittance costs also without regard to the nationality of the sender and the recipient.

Incorporating a Thai company in Thailand is certainly a good idea, if you want to start a business in Thailand, regardless of your nationality. However, it is a lot easier for Thai citizens to own, direct and work in their own companies.

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Are there any experiences that MOI telephoned to applicant and questioning, interviewing (indirectly) or checking the applicant's status as written in application for naturalisation before interview or before giving permission to be Thai citizen?

Yes, I got a call on my mobile from the MoI before interview enquiring about a document which fortunately I was able to deal with to their satisfaction. I think it is unlikely they would actually interview applicants on the phone, since they get the chance to do that in the formal interviews at the MoI in the appropriate sub-committee of 15 representatives format, as prescribed in the regulations. The checking of your status as declared in the application form is supposed to be done by the NIA as part of the vetting process before your file is sent to the MoI by SB - that is the guy who calls to invite you to an interview at Micky D in Ratchprasong. The MoI's role is to check the documents in your file to make sure you are fully qualified according to the law and regulations and make a subjective assessment of your suitability for Thai citizenship at interview, including your Thai language proficiency and singing abilities (if not married to a Thai).

In any case, it is advisable to field all calls from strange numbers during the entire period of your application. You never know when you might suddenly find yourself talking to a senior civil servant at the MoI. Once you've got your ID card you can give unidentified callers the red button!

Thanks Arkady, actually I got call also from MOI and felt like they are rechecking the status, circumstances asking some questions and make sure that I am the suitable applicant to call for an interview. All conversation was in Thai language. Hope would be having an interview soon at MOI.

That's interesting. I would think it probably does mean they are planning to put you up for interview soon and I do hope so. Interviews are usually mid to late in the month. This year they have taken place on 14 March and 22 April. SB is sent a list of interviewees and sends out invitation letters to them which sometimes arrive at very short notice or even after the interviews have already taken place. I would get on the phone to your friendly case officer at SB and ask them to call you the moment they see your name on the list. Good luck.

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SB is sent a list of interviewees and sends out invitation letters to them which sometimes arrive at very short notice or even after the interviews have already taken place.

That happened to me and I missed my scheduled interview date. Turned out not to be as big a problem as I feared. I wrote a letter to SB explaining why I missed the interview and they rescheduled me for the next month (or perhaps the month after that).

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SB is sent a list of interviewees and sends out invitation letters to them which sometimes arrive at very short notice or even after the interviews have already taken place.

That happened to me and I missed my scheduled interview date. Turned out not to be as big a problem as I feared. I wrote a letter to SB explaining why I missed the interview and they rescheduled me for the next month (or perhaps the month after that).

Amazing but lucky you got rescheduled easily. My SB officer called to let me know the interview was coming up. The hard copy of the letter arrived the day after the interview by registered mail but luckily I had a fax of it beforehand courtesy of my friendly police officer. That's why I say it is worth keeping in touch with the officer that handles your application.

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It could only happen if you were under 30 when you get citizenship.

In the majority of cases I suspect most people getting citizenship will be be over 30.

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Hi Guys can anyone advise/help me with my last post here: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/617112-status-on-applying-for-thai-pr/ I am Sooo close to completing my application and this is the last issue sad.png

From looking at that thread I can't see what your last issue is, unless it is the yellow tabien baan which you must have to qualify. I notice that someone told you that you don't need a bank statement because you have submitted your tax receipts. This is wrong as it is clearly there in the ministry's guidelines and everyone has to provide notarised tax receipts. You need a letter from a bank addressed correctly to Special Branch HQ of your province, confirming your bank balance of that date. (Mine was rejected twice because the bank kept refusing to do exactly what I asked after calling some idiot at HO who said he knew better). Your witnesses will have to confirm this balance in the interview they have to do with Special Branch which may be done in absentia, if SB feels in a good mood.

I would go through the guidelines with a toothcomb and make sure all your 't's and crossed and 'i's dotted. Don't rely on Nonthaburi Special Branch who probably don't have much experience of doing this. Mistakes can cost months or years of delays and even get your application totally rejected and make you apply again from scratch, if you still have the heart. The only document in the guidelines I know of that can be ignored by most people is the document from your embassy confirming you are of legal age and even that depends on how old you are and what is your nationality. I was only told this by SB after I had already spent Bt 3,000 on it and spent time explaining to puzzled embassy staff why they had to certify an old fart like me was over the age of majority!

Edited by Arkady
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Hi Guys can anyone advise/help me with my last post here: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/617112-status-on-applying-for-thai-pr/ I am Sooo close to completing my application and this is the last issue sad.png

From looking at that thread I can't see what your last issue is, unless it is the yellow tabien baan which you must have to qualify. I notice that someone told you that you don't need a bank statement because you have submitted your tax receipts. This is wrong as it is clearly there in the ministry's guidelines and everyone has to provide notarised tax receipts. You need a letter from a bank addressed correctly to Special Branch HQ of your province, confirming your bank balance of that date. (Mine was rejected twice because the bank kept refusing to do exactly what I asked after calling some idiot at HO who said he knew better). Your witnesses will have to confirm this balance in the interview they have to do with Special Branch which may be done in absentia, if SB feels in a good mood.

I would go through the guidelines with a toothcomb and make sure all your 't's and crossed and 'i's dotted. Don't rely on Nonthaburi Special Branch who probably don't have much experience of doing this. Mistakes can cost months or years of delays and even get your application totally rejected and make you apply again from scratch, if you still have the heart. The only document in the guidelines I know of that can be ignored by most people is the document from your embassy confirming you are of legal age and even that depends on how old you are and what is your nationality. I was only told this by SB after I had already spent Bt 3,000 on it and spent time explaining to puzzled embassy staff why they had to certify an old fart like me was over the age of majority!

Hi Thanks for the heads up, and yes I was thinking that the Police at Special Branch where a little "don't need that or this" - so once they accept (what I hope is the complete set of Doco's) where excatualy does it go from there? (meaning at what stage where your Bank statements rejected?

As far as the Yellow book goes I just didn't really know about it now I am clued up and will get it sorted out....

Question about - "Your witnesses will have to confirm this balance in the interview they

have to do with Special Branch which may be done in absentia, if SB

feels in a good mood." - What exactually they have to do with my finances? I thought they where just for character reference? and I never knew they had to also go to an interview? and if so at what stage?

Thanks for the help as I wanna get the correct documents in, and try my best to understand the steps lol

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