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Story Of My Thai Citizenship Application

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I wonder with some concern how this Declaration of Renunciation might affect those who have already applied for Thai citizenship. Take me, for example - I applied in May 2007 and my application was officially submitted to the Interior Ministry in July 2007. I had my formal interview with the Interior Ministry in July 2008. Since then, almost three years since my application, not a peep.

I wonder how, if at all, the Declaration of Renunciation will affect my application. Will I be required to submit such a declaration in the future even though it was not a requirement when I submitted my application? Any thoughts?

I am an Australian citizen. I was told by the Special Branch that I scored 92 points on my original citizenship application in 2007 - not that that has any bearing on this issue.

I don't think this would affect your case because the October 2009 Interior Ministry guidelines were not in effect when you applied. The process takes such a long time that things are bound to change during the course of individual applications and I don't think the Interior Ministry would make new requirements retroactive. For example, they are not likely to chase up pending applicants for another B5,000 once the application fee is raised from B5,000 to 10,000. On the other hand, I wouldn't be surprised if applicants who applied under the old guidelines but haven't been before the Interior Ministry committee got popped the question by the committee because they will probably now be asking every one for a verbal confirmation of intention to renounce existing nationality. Since you have already passed the committee, that shouldn't be an issue. It would do no harm to ask Special Branch directly. Although they can never give a definitive answer about the workings of the ministry, their guess would be better than ours.

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Thank you, Arkady. This is what I suspected but it is good to get your input. I am now trying to use a couple of my contacts to speed the process along. We shall see - but I won't hold my breath!

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I have read these posts with great interest, particularly as I have just completed the process with the police. My original application was around august 2009. The head of the department didn't give me the choice of singing with a cheat sheet so I had to do it from memory. I had spent many hours learning it by heart anyway. Had a pleasant discussion with him at the end of which he told me he had no problem. Although I was given the "test" - 10 or so questions about Thai culture etc, the policeman assisted with any part of the questions I could not read. I was not specifically tested for reading or writing although the policemen insisted that I sign the documents in Thai.

I also had to present letters to immigration and the local town hall and also my embassy. The local town hall to arrange a Thai Name and the embassy to guarantee that I was old enough to make a sensible choice ( I am 65 but look a little younger :))

At some later point (around Jan 2010) I was interviewed again at the local MacDonalds - presumably by the secret service?

I have just recently been given a copy of the letter from the police to the interior ministry which states that I got more than 50 points and fullfilled all the requiremenst etc. I have no idea how many points I actually got although I would expect it to me over 75.

I was warned the the ministry might take between 1 and 10 years!!,

Any advise on how to speed up the ministry would be well received.

Regards

Nick

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No offence

But

To me this story seems like a big true lie which ever forum I visit, I find the same f*****g story all around , is there any one else been through this ? if yes please contact me at

Edited by lopburi3
email removed

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I have read these posts with great interest, particularly as I have just completed the process with the police. My original application was around august 2009. The head of the department didn't give me the choice of singing with a cheat sheet so I had to do it from memory. I had spent many hours learning it by heart anyway. Had a pleasant discussion with him at the end of which he told me he had no problem. Although I was given the "test" - 10 or so questions about Thai culture etc, the policeman assisted with any part of the questions I could not read. I was not specifically tested for reading or writing although the policemen insisted that I sign the documents in Thai.

I also had to present letters to immigration and the local town hall and also my embassy. The local town hall to arrange a Thai Name and the embassy to guarantee that I was old enough to make a sensible choice ( I am 65 but look a little younger :))

At some later point (around Jan 2010) I was interviewed again at the local MacDonalds - presumably by the secret service?

I have just recently been given a copy of the letter from the police to the interior ministry which states that I got more than 50 points and fullfilled all the requiremenst etc. I have no idea how many points I actually got although I would expect it to me over 75.

I was warned the the ministry might take between 1 and 10 years!!,

Any advise on how to speed up the ministry would be well received.

Regards

Nick

Yes, the interview in McDonalds at Amarin Plaza is with the National Intelligence Agency. Their office is somewhere in Dusit and they are decent enough to meet applicants at a more accessible and central location. If you are married to a Thai, they will interview you as a couple. The interview is to gather and verify information about your circumstances in Thailand and about your marriage and how you met, if you are married to a Thai. I don't know what checking they do afterwards. It probably depends on the case. The interview normally takes place within 2 months of your application being accepted by Special Branch and is part of the checking by various agencies including the Narcotics Bureau, the Criminal Records Dept etc.

Re singing you have to ask permission to use a cheat sheet. I was allowed to do so but warned that the Ministry no longer allows cheat sheets. However, I don't know whether the Ministry asks applicants married to Thais to sing at all or gives them the option, as Special Branch now does. The reading and writing tests were only introduced under the latest points allocation guidelines which came in in I think in March 2010 and assigns 15 points for knowledge of Thai language, up from 10. I had to ask to do the reading and writing tests, as well as the singing, but I don't know if this is always the case - perhaps just in the case of applicants with Thai wives. The reading and writing tests I did were ad hoc and involved reading out a memo on the officer's desk and writing out something very short and official sounding dictated by the officer. Some knowledge of civil service Thai is required. I got full marks for Thai language and singing was told my points for all the tests except "personality" (5 points) on the spot. I calculated I probably got 88 or 89 overall - not much I can do about not having a PhD etc.

Even 1-10 years may be too conservative. I was shown a new naturalization certificate, issued 11 years after application. I have been told that only extremely high up connections can be of help in speeding up the process. I take this to mean at Interior Minister level or higher and the connection should remain in office long enough to see the process concluded which may not be very easy in Thai politics.

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Yes, the interview in McDonalds at Amarin Plaza is with the National Intelligence Agency. Their office is somewhere in Dusit and they are decent enough to meet applicants at a more accessible and central location. If you are married to a Thai, they will interview you as a couple. The interview is to gather and verify information about your circumstances in Thailand and about your marriage and how you met, if you are married to a Thai. I don't know what checking they do afterwards. It probably depends on the case. The interview normally takes place within 2 months of your application being accepted by Special Branch and is part of the checking by various agencies including the Narcotics Bureau, the Criminal Records Dept etc.

Our interview took place one month after the application at the Special Branch.

Lucky bloke I was. :rolleyes: The investigators came to my province and we had our interview at the The Provincial Administrative Organisation, 5 minutes away from my house. :D

Three months later my application was sent to the Interior Ministry.

Thanks again, Arkady for all your time informing the members at this board. :jap:

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I wonder with some concern how this Declaration of Renunciation might affect those who have already applied for Thai citizenship. Take me, for example - I applied in May 2007 and my application was officially submitted to the Interior Ministry in July 2007. I had my formal interview with the Interior Ministry in July 2008. Since then, almost three years since my application, not a peep.

I wonder how, if at all, the Declaration of Renunciation will affect my application. Will I be required to submit such a declaration in the future even though it was not a requirement when I submitted my application? Any thoughts?

I am an Australian citizen. I was told by the Special Branch that I scored 92 points on my original citizenship application in 2007 - not that that has any bearing on this issue.

I don't think this would affect your case because the October 2009 Interior Ministry guidelines were not in effect when you applied. The process takes such a long time that things are bound to change during the course of individual applications and I don't think the Interior Ministry would make new requirements retroactive. For example, they are not likely to chase up pending applicants for another B5,000 once the application fee is raised from B5,000 to 10,000. On the other hand, I wouldn't be surprised if applicants who applied under the old guidelines but haven't been before the Interior Ministry committee got popped the question by the committee because they will probably now be asking every one for a verbal confirmation of intention to renounce existing nationality. Since you have already passed the committee, that shouldn't be an issue. It would do no harm to ask Special Branch directly. Although they can never give a definitive answer about the workings of the ministry, their guess would be better than ours.

I know of one guy here 30 years who has gone through this process, his ratings etc are impeccable. He has spent a great deal on it already and several years down the line he was informed if he wanted it to finally go through 'quickly' it would be 250k, rather a lot of tea money. He declined and the latest figure they gave him to expedite his case was 500.000 baht. !!

Two things strike me, one is why do these people think their crappy passport is worth that to anyone, and second why any falang would want to pay it after forking out substantial sums already. Also, who would want a passport from one of the most corrupt countries in the world anyway even without the corruption involved in getting one. On the other hand any old Thai tart can marry a bloke from the UK lets say, divorce him after a minimal amount of time and then claim residency and a passport, something don't seem right.

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9) I have a new Thai identity, forename and surname. Good for

travelling to places that dislike my country of origin

If he is from Israel he can now visit the Muslim countries that were off-limits with an Israeli passport, such as Malaysia.

If he is American he can reduce his risk of trouble in whatever country has anti-US riots...

well , thats true but when he got his thai citizenship his skin colour and body shape didnt change so he will allways have difficulties explaining he is a thai and not farang

like if he is an american booldozer and enters an arab country he will be seen as an american and not as thai no matter what the papers show

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I note that Ananda (spelling?) Everingham got his Thai citizenship recently. He claimed that it only took two weeks and was much easier than PR. It is things like this that actually get my goat. TheChiefJustice has been waiting over two years, while this other fellow gets it in 2 weeks. Double standard? One is a heartthrob actor and the other, I don't know, but it is certainly unfair. To be fair, Ananda said that the system is unfair, so despite protestations to the contrary having someone of influence in your corner certainly does help.

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I note that Ananda (spelling?) Everingham got his Thai citizenship recently. He claimed that it only took two weeks and was much easier than PR. It is things like this that actually get my goat. TheChiefJustice has been waiting over two years, while this other fellow gets it in 2 weeks. Double standard? One is a heartthrob actor and the other, I don't know, but it is certainly unfair. To be fair, Ananda said that the system is unfair, so despite protestations to the contrary having someone of influence in your corner certainly does help.

Their situations are totally different. The ChiefJustice is applying for naturalization as a Thai citizen, Ananda has Thai nationality by way of being born in Thailand.

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Noted. It still seems a bit strange to go through the PR thing if he was entitled anyway through being born in Thailand. And why now, won't he be subject to conscription. Maybe, like me, he had been given incorrect advice down the line. Luckily, TV has set me straight.

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Noted. It still seems a bit strange to go through the PR thing if he was entitled anyway through being born in Thailand. And why now, won't he be subject to conscription. Maybe, like me, he had been given incorrect advice down the line. Luckily, TV has set me straight.

I suspect it is faster as it goes through seperate channels.

Arkady is the real pro on this one, but ammendments to the nationality act in 2008 opened up the right for those born in Thailand to foreign parents between 1972 and 1992 to become Thai citizens, so long as the could prove an ongoing link to the country.

My understanding of this is that the process is handled through the Ampur who have the guidelines laid out for them, rather than the MOI and the national police. No ministerial discretion involved.

Essentially, so long as you approach an enlightened Ampur, your status as a Thai citizen by birth will be recognised, and you'll be granted an ID.

Google ฟองจันทร์ สุขเสน่ห์ ได้สัญชาติไทยแล้ว and you'll see a video result showing a news story of a young lass born to American parents who when through the same process (aplogies, but pasting the direct link takes you to another video for some bizzare reason).

This in itself, is sufficient to make one eligible for mililary conscription. Me thinks though as he is likely to have reached his 30th birthday, this makes him ineligible for call up (only 18 to 29 year olds can be conscripted).

Edited by samran

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I have read these posts with great interest, particularly as I have just completed the process with the police. My original application was around august 2009. The head of the department didn't give me the choice of singing with a cheat sheet so I had to do it from memory. I had spent many hours learning it by heart anyway. Had a pleasant discussion with him at the end of which he told me he had no problem. Although I was given the "test" - 10 or so questions about Thai culture etc, the policeman assisted with any part of the questions I could not read. I was not specifically tested for reading or writing although the policemen insisted that I sign the documents in Thai.

I also had to present letters to immigration and the local town hall and also my embassy. The local town hall to arrange a Thai Name and the embassy to guarantee that I was old enough to make a sensible choice ( I am 65 but look a little younger :))

At some later point (around Jan 2010) I was interviewed again at the local MacDonalds - presumably by the secret service?

I have just recently been given a copy of the letter from the police to the interior ministry which states that I got more than 50 points and fullfilled all the requiremenst etc. I have no idea how many points I actually got although I would expect it to me over 75.

I was warned the the ministry might take between 1 and 10 years!!,

Any advise on how to speed up the ministry would be well received.

Regards

Nick

My wife applied in about April 08 from memory. We just recently got the same letter. Hers was based on marriage to me, so I'm not sure if that exempted her from singing the anthem.

We were also interviewed at KFC at Victory monument. The officials were from MOI.

My wife 'passed' as well the selection cut off, though the selection criteria had more to do with me being able to support her (good income etc) than anything to do with my wife.

Go figure.

We expect a loooooong wait as well.

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I know I have spoken about this before but for the life of me I cannot find the post or the message.

I note that one of the requirements is:

"8. Evidence of charitable donations (not less than Baht 5,000 and should include donations made some time ago, not just in time for nationality application)."

In my time here I have given much more than that but never kept a receipt or used a donation for tax deduction purposes. One of you suggested that I try to go back to where I donated and see if I can get a copy of the record, and I am working on this. However, supposing I am unable to obtain the required evidence, I need to make further donations. In this regard, I wonder whether there are any preferred charities, or am I free to donate to anything such a Po Teck Tung, a temple renovation fund, animal shelter, etc. I know it may seem a petty question but I would rather do the right thing than get my application kicked back when I submit it a few years down the road because the donations I make are not recognized.

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