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Story Of My Thai Citizenship Application

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Just got mine. Three years and two months, start to finish.

Congratulations. :jap:

Seconded.

How long had you lived in Thailand before you applied?

RAZZ

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Just got mine. Three years and two months, start to finish.

Congratulations. :jap:

Seconded.

How long had you lived in Thailand before you applied?

RAZZ

17 years, including 5 as PR.

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If you don't mind me asking, what is your nationality?

American.

North or South American?

55555 - just joking.

many congrats. The three year timeframe puts my wifes application up for approval 'perhaps', around the first half of next year.

Lets see.

Again, many congrats and well deserved by the sounds of it.

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Just got mine. Three years and two months, start to finish.

Wow.Let me join the crowd in congratulations!

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A belated congratulations from me too.

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Just got mine. Three years and two months, start to finish.

Congrats. Gives fresh hope to the rest of us in the queue. May I ask if you were asked at any point about renunciation of existing nationality?

BTW I am assuming (and hoping) that the 1,000 people I was quoted as being in the queue for interviews is a figure of speech, since we know that not many people apply every year.

Edited by Arkady

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There was never any mentioning of renouncing my US citizenship.

I had to travel out of Thailand just before I got my new ID card, and I mentioned to the immigration lady at the airport that this would be the last time I would be exiting on my US passport as I had just obtained Thai citizenship. She congratulated me, and reminded me to "always use your Thai passport coming in and out of Thailand, but use your US passport, which will still be good, to enter places where Thais need visas".

I don't know about the number of people applying each year. The day I had my Ministry of Interior interview, there were about 250 other people there for the same reason. No more than five were Westerners.

If you can read Thai, you can see all announcements of new successful Thai citizenship applications going back many years on the Royal Gazette website. There are very few Western names being announced -- usually fewer than five a year.

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I don't know about the number of people applying each year. The day I had my Ministry of Interior interview, there were about 250 other people there for the same reason. No more than five were Westerners.

If you can read Thai, you can see all announcements of new successful Thai citizenship applications going back many years on the Royal Gazette website. There are very few Western names being announced -- usually fewer than five a year.

Can you post the direct link to the name list?

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Following Richard4849's suggestion I have had a look at the Royal Gazette (Tombkk you need to do a search for nationality สัญชาติ here http://www.ratchakitcha.soc.go.th/RKJ/index/index.htm)and came up with the following statistics of people granted Thai nationality for the period 2006-2010 to date (5 years).

2006

35 females with Thai husbands

1 female who recovered Thai nationality following divorce from a foreign national

2007

99 females with Thai husbands

1 female who recovered Thai nationality following divorce from a foreign national

2008

44 females with Thai husbands

3 females who recovered Thai nationality following divorce from a foreign national

32 males of which 5 with farang names

9 females without Thai husbands

518 males and females en bloc from Chumporn

2009

4 females with Thai husbands of which 2 farang

1 female who recovered Thai nationality following divorce from a foreign national

2010

7 females with Thai husbands of which 2 farang

1 female who recovered Thai nationality following divorce from a foreign national

120 males of which 11 with farang names

25 females without Thai husbands

1,053 male and female en bloc from Ranong, Tak and Nong Khai

To summarise by category from 2006 to 2010:

189 females with Thai husbands

7 females who recovered Thai nationality following divorce from a foreign national

152 males of which 16 with farang names

34 females without Thai husbands

1,571 males and females en bloc from 4 provinces.

Excluding the citizenship recoveries and the en bloc applicants, that comes to an average of 75 new citizenships granted a year which is probably a lot more than most people would have thought.

There may be some discrepancies in my numbers as it is a fairly tedious job to read through the many entries to do with nationality and anyone who has time to pore over them in more detail should feel free to correct my analysis.

For interest quite a few of the females without Thai husbands got their Thai nationality at the same time as their husbands or fathers, implying that they applied as a family. Without more detailed analysis it is hard to tell but I would suspect that very few females have applied under their own steam and I couldn’t spot any farang names that appeared to be in this category.

The 1,571 males and females from 4 provinces who got their Thai nationality en bloc mainly have Thai sounding names, frequently with a one syllable name that sounds like a Thai nickname as their first name. I assume these were hill tribe people or people from neighbouring countries. The wording of the announcements is the same as for other announcements of naturalization with no other explanation of their circumstances.

I didn’t bother to count them all but there are hundreds of announcements of women renouncing their Thai nationality in order to adopt their husbands’ Taiwanese nationality, as a result of Taiwan’s discriminatory nationality laws which allow dual nationality for those who are born Taiwanese but force those wishing to become Taiwanese to renounce their existing nationality. This results in many cases of stateless women who get dumped by their Taiwanese men before their nationality application is complete. All 7 cases of those women who recovered their Thai nationality after divorce from a foreign national had been married to a Taiwanese. The second largest group of those renouncing Thai nationality were those who had obtained German nationality, mainly females but with a handful of males. A couple of Thais gave up their Thai nationality to become Dutch, Korean or Singaporean and one apparently misguided Thai male renounced his Thai nationality in favour of American nationality.

So there you have it. The statistics of the last few years are lumpy to say the least with sudden surges of activity and lengthy quiet periods, while some years favour one category of applicant or another. Women married to Thais seem, as many suspected, to have the best chance and were approved in each of the five years. Male applicants (apart from those en bloc from the provinces) have only been granted nationality in two out of the five years but 2010 has been a particularly good year for them which might signal a dry year or two for males coming up. I can’t say if any of the males applied without PR but with Thai wives under the provisions of the 2008 Act but I doubt if any of those have come through the pipeline yet. At any rate their applications are now under the same section of the Nationality Act as males and females who apply on the basis of having PR, so the wording of the announcements are likely to be exactly the same. Virtually all of the males (apart from the en bloc ones) who were naturalized were from Bangkok, although one or two were from the neighbouring provinces of Nonthaburi and Samut Prakarn. The same applies to the women with Thai husbands although there were a few from Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai. Although most expats are obviously based in Bangkok the almost total dearth of applications approved from the provinces seems to support complaints in TV that some provincial Special Branch offices are not accommodating towards those wishing to apply for citizenship. Former nationalities are no longer announced, except in the case of women with Thai husbands, but most of the names that don't sound farang sound as if they are probably Chinese, Korean, Indian or Pakistani.

Edited by Arkady

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