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Story Of My Thai Citizenship Application

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Neeranam said:

I'd feel safer taking my translated birth certificate. I needed that when adding my parents name to my yellow housebook. Remember, it is illegal to use your  other passport in Thailand.

I suppose that could work too.  I'm curious if they will accept any document, or even take your word for it, if you don't bring your old passport.  It maybe doesn't happen very often, but if someone wants to "change" their place of birth because their original birth place may cause issues when traveling to certain places (like a birth place in Israel when traveling to Iran, or a birth place in the US when traveling to North Korea).  If your shiny new Thai passport had a more neutral birthplace, this would allow you to avoid getting singled out or possibly harassed when traveling to certain areas of the world if you come from certain other areas of the world.   

 

Apparently birth location is not a mandatory field on whatever international requirements govern the data including in E-Passports, because some countries still do not include the birthplace, or rather include a place of origin which is nothing more than where your family name comes from.  It seems to be an unimportant piece of data when compared to name or birthdate, but it is a piece of data that can single you out.

 

Right now the Thai passport is not very powerful or respected, but who knows in the future, maybe it will be more like a Singaporean passport. In which case, having a Thai passport with a birthplace that doesn't have any enemies, might be the safest thing to have for international travel 😀

Edited by khongaeng
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2 hours ago, khongaeng said:

I have a question for those of you that have a gotten a Thai passport.  When you get your first Thai passport, how do they know where your place of birth is?  It is not shown on your ID card or House Registration.  I think I remember reading 100+ pages back that the passport office asked to see someone’s other national passport (many nationalities list place of birth on the passport).  What if you don’t bring your other nationality passport, or if your other nationality passport doesn’t list your birthplace? 

It will be on your house registry, so don't stress about it. They don't get too specific anyway - it only states the country you were born in on the Thai PP.

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, samran said:

It will be on your house registry, so don't stress about it. They don't get too specific anyway - it only states the country you were born in on the Thai PP.

I agree that the birthplace is undoubtedly in the House Registry system, and I assume the Passport system and House Registry system are linked too, but your birthplace is not printed in your house registration book, and it is curious that they want to see your old passport to find out your birthplace.

Edited by khongaeng

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, khongaeng said:

I agree that the birthplace is undoubtedly in the House Registry system, and I assume the Passport system and House Registry system are linked too, but your birthplace is not printed in your house registration book, and it is curious that they want to see your old passport to find out your birthplace.

Probably for another level of cross checking is my guess as that (as well as your foreign BC) are the 'original' documents for when it comes to confirming your place of birth.

 

There are indeed some strange quirks on it all. For instance, our three children are born here and are Thai citizens, based of being born to me, a Thai citizen. They were born before my wife naturalised as a Thai citizen a few years back and their birth certificates state that their mother is not a Thai national.

 

As such, when we go and get new Thai passports for our kids, my wife has to show the passport of her original nationality as ID before the kids can be issued Thai passports. Her current Thai ID card doesn't cut it. Strange but true. 

Edited by samran
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In my case, old passport was requested to see place of birth. My house reg does not list my country of birth, but list the nationalities of my parents which I simply told them (no proof needed). In my Thai passport, country of birth is written in English not Thai. 

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6 hours ago, Barty said:

In my case I used my original passport to prove my place of birth. The passport office actually asked for the old passport.

I too was asked for my British Passport by the Thai passport office. 

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22 hours ago, samran said:

Probably for another level of cross checking is my guess as that (as well as your foreign BC) are the 'original' documents for when it comes to confirming your place of birth.

 

There are indeed some strange quirks on it all. For instance, our three children are born here and are Thai citizens, based of being born to me, a Thai citizen. They were born before my wife naturalised as a Thai citizen a few years back and their birth certificates state that their mother is not a Thai national.

 

As such, when we go and get new Thai passports for our kids, my wife has to show the passport of her original nationality as ID before the kids can be issued Thai passports. Her current Thai ID card doesn't cut it. Strange but true. 

Very interesting.  Last time I got new Thai passports for my kids, I mentioned with a smile to the nice supervisor lady helping us with the process that next time I see her, I would be getting my own Thai passport.  

 

Noticing that our house registration and birth certificates are a mess with kids being born different places and even my name being written slightly differently for different children, the official said that when I get my Thai citizenship that I could get it all fixed, and that in the house registration it will state my name correctly for all kids and that my kids’ father is Thai and not the previous nationality.  She then said the next time we all got passports together, it could all be re-aligned so I wouldn’t have to show my previous nationality passport.  

 

I don’t know how true this is since I haven’t gone through the process myself, but she seemed to be very convinced that this would be possible.  I myself was surprised that anything in the House Registration could be changed, but maybe it is possible if you can show that the information was entered incompletely years ago.  

 

Hopefully later this year I can give everyone an update on this.

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On 5/8/2020 at 12:21 PM, khongaeng said:

Hopefully later this year I can give everyone an update on this.

I look forward to hearing about that.

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Hi, 

Apologies if this has been answered recently, but I gave the last 357 pages a quick scan and couldn't see a list of requirements, costs, and approximate time for obtaining residency visa AND Thai passport for foreigners. 

 

A friend in the Philippines had residency visa canceled in the wake of Covid-19. He's allowed to stay but will have to apply again. I encouraged him to look at Thailand since there's an actual path to citizenship. He didn't believe it was possible anywhere in Asia. I told him the only other Asian country I ever met a passport waving foreigner in was Japan. A woman there got hers after working in Japan for a whopping 15 years. 

 

I told him I've occasionally met foreign retirees in Thailand who waived their Thai passports to prove to me they got it. From talking to them it seemed like a 6 year process. 

 

He likes to travel and I told him one of the main benefits is no more visa runs for all the ASEAN countries such as Indonesia which has terrible restrictions for exit. 

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any movement for oath ceremony for anyone

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19 minutes ago, cmsally said:

House registration and ID card all successfully achieved. Now the only thing left is to cancel my Thai visa in my foreign passport. Bet that will cause some confusion !!! Can't wait! :wacko:

Congratulations!

 

I'd first assume you can leave it like this until it expires, after all you will no longer use the foreign passport in Thailand right? but maybe from an immigration point of view something opened has to be closed... that would make sense to me. The good thing is: this will be the last time you will ever have to deal with immigration. Good luck.

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2 hours ago, david143 said:

any movement for oath ceremony for anyone

I wss hoping you had some insight. 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, david143 said:

any movement for oath ceremony for anyone

A batch of 40-50 people was approved last month. I guess all of them -including me- are done with their oath and en route to the RG normally for July. If the trend continues by that time I'd expect another group to have been called for the oath because it's 2-4 month interval normally between each.

Edited by GabbaGabbaHey
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