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UK citizen (English) but need the above for settlement in Spain.

 

Believe all NI residents can receive Irish passport.If I take accommodation address in NI would it qualify for one?

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18 minutes ago, BangkokAlan said:

Residency in NI won’t qualify you as it’s part of UK unless you hold an Irish passport or have the right to an Irish passport as a child or grandchild of Irish born parents/grandparents. 

Thanks,maybe just poss as had NI grandparent,but long long dead and means going back for decades trying for information....may just buy one

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19 minutes ago, Poet said:

If either of your parents or any of your grandparents were born anywhere in Ireland (North or South, it makes no difference) you are already considered to be a citizen of Ireland.

To apply for a passport, just include copies of any relevant birth certs. Even for a grandparent, these would be relatively easy to acquire if you know what parish he/she was born in. You should be able to order them online for a minimal fee.

The Irish authorities welcome applications and don't pull any beaucratic nonsense. Something like half-a-million UK residents gained an Irish passport last year. Making it easy for the Irish diaspora to get Irish passports is considered a to be a very positive thing for the country. Unlike the UK system, no one will be searching for excuses to reject your application.

It is a good passport to have. I notice that immigration officials and hotel staff tend to be friendlier when I use my Irish rather than UK passport. Some countries offer better visa terms to UK citizens, for some Irish citizenship is better.

EDIT: Just to be clear, you do not need your grandparent's original birth cert. If it is for someone long dead, the local authorities will give you a new certificate verifying the details they have for that birth as listed in their register for that year. All of this stuff is digitized.

 

Now I have a name (grandparent) but that's about all,the parish long forgotten,have to look on a map see if it jogs the memory   ,or all I can do is throw myself at the mercy of Irish passport authority  Just want to get the hell out of Thailand without going back to UK

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1 minute ago, izod10 said:

Now I have a name (grandparent) but that's about all,the parish long forgotten,have to look on a map see if it jogs the memory   ,or all I can do is throw myself at the mercy of Irish passport authority  Just want to get the hell out of Thailand without going back to UK


Ireland is small. If you even know the county you can probably find the birth record.

Look, unless your grandparent has a very unusual name, it should be possible to find the birth of someone with the same name born around the same decade. As long as the same name appears as parent on one of your parents' birth certs, and as long as that parent's name appears on your birth cert, that would be your proof of lineage.

Again, Irish civil servants will not try to catch you out, no one actually cares if you found the birth cert for the right Joseph Flynn or whatever, and you only have to provide this paperwork once.

Hundreds of thousands of people are doing the same thing, you will no doubt find plenty of tips online about getting the birth certs.
 

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16 minutes ago, izod10 said:

Just want to get the hell out of Thailand without going back to UK


FWIW, plenty of people stuck outside Thailand would LOVE to be in your position right now.

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1 hour ago, Poet said:


FWIW, plenty of people stuck outside Thailand would LOVE to be in your position right now.

Let them come to Thailand,they will soon change their tune,getting more Irish than the Irish could dream up....been here must be around 15 years or so,feels like a jail sentence now

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If you are non Irish ( Irish Republic ) and wish to be considered for an Irish passport you need to take up residency in the Republic for a period of one year during that time you are not permitted to leave the country . I am Irish my wife is Welsh and even though she is married to me that is the requirement however if you have a relative alive or passed who was Irish you can apply and it’s more likely you would qualify . My children can get Irish passport due to my being Irish but my wife can only get it if she were to reside there for an unbroken year it sounds crazy but that how it is .

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Just now, crazykopite said:

If you are non Irish ( Irish Republic ) and wish to be considered for an Irish passport you need to take up residency in the Republic for a period of one year during that time you are not permitted to leave the country . I am Irish my wife is Welsh and even though she is married to me that is the requirement however if you have a relative alive or passed who was Irish you can apply and it’s more likely you would qualify . My children can get Irish passport due to my being Irish but my wife can only get it if she were to reside there for an unbroken year it sounds crazy but that how it is .

are you sure that it is one year?  When I was living there for a short while, albeit 20 years ago, it was 4 years of residency to qualify. 

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14 hours ago, Poet said:

To apply for a passport, just include copies of any relevant birth certs. Even for a grandparent, these would be relatively easy to acquire if you know what parish he/she was born in. You should be able to order them online for a minimal fee.

I did this. It was a long time ago, but I remember when I took the short form birth cert in, I was told I needed the long form (which I was indeed able to order online).

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7 hours ago, crazykopite said:

If you are non Irish ( Irish Republic ) and wish to be considered for an Irish passport you need to take up residency in the Republic for a period of one year during that time you are not permitted to leave the country .

 

Five years, with 365 days without leaving the country immediately proceeding application.

 

https://www.irishimmigration.ie/citizenship/become-an-irish-citizen-by-naturalisation/#Adult-EU

 

 

But given @izod10's grandfather was Irish he could do so by "Registering a foreign birth" which would take 12 to 18 months if he could get all the paperwork (sounds like an issue) and ... if the process wasn't suspended due to Covid.

 

Documents relating to the grandparent born in Ireland (unless stated, originals must be submitted):

  • Original civil birth certificate of Irish born grandparent (showing parental details)
  • Original civil marriage certificate of Irish born grandparent (if applicable) OR other change of name document (if applicable)
  • Photocopy of current state-issued ID document (i.e. passport, drivers licence, national identity card) certified as a true copy of the original by a professional from the list of witnesses OR original civil death certificate (if applicable)

 

https://www.dfa.ie/citizenship/born-abroad/registering-a-foreign-birth/

 

 

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On 4/12/2021 at 1:37 AM, Poet said:


Ireland is small. If you even know the county you can probably find the birth record.

Look, unless your grandparent has a very unusual name, it should be possible to find the birth of someone with the same name born around the same decade. As long as the same name appears as parent on one of your parents' birth certs, and as long as that parent's name appears on your birth cert, that would be your proof of lineage.

Again, Irish civil servants will not try to catch you out, no one actually cares if you found the birth cert for the right Joseph Flynn or whatever, and you only have to provide this paperwork once.

Hundreds of thousands of people are doing the same thing, you will no doubt find plenty of tips online about getting the birth certs.
 

I doubt that you are correct about  Irish civil servants. They are not as lax as you are suggesting. 

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On 4/12/2021 at 2:21 AM, izod10 said:

Now I have a name (grandparent) but that's about all,the parish long forgotten,have to look on a map see if it jogs the memory   ,or all I can do is throw myself at the mercy of Irish passport authority  Just want to get the hell out of Thailand without going back to UK

You have to be registered as a foreign born citizen or something like that.You will need the birth and death certificate of your grandparent(s)and marriage certificates, birth certificates of your parents and of course your birth certificate.If accepted as a citizen only then can you apply for a passport.Thats a rough guide.

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1 minute ago, adammike said:

You have to be registered as a foreign born citizen or something like that.You will need the birth and death certificate of your grandparent(s)and marriage certificates, birth certificates of your parents and of course your birth certificate.If accepted as a citizen only then can you apply for a passport.Thats a rough guide.

Sorry didn't see Salerno had already posted the info 

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3 hours ago, Lancelot01 said:

I doubt that you are correct about  Irish civil servants. They are not as lax as you are suggesting. 


Where, exactly, did I say that Irish civil servants are lax?

You misinterpreted what I said because you perceive the world through a British lense. British policy, for my entire lifetime, has been to limit immigration and naturalisation. Ireland is a different country, with a different culture, a different history, and a different outlook on the world.

I have repeatedly referred to the policy of the Irish government. It is both their official policy and their sincere wish to encourage and welcome passport applications from members of the Irish diaspora. We lost so many of them due to the <deleted>-poor performance of the previous management. Under the constitution of Ireland, these people are already citizens of Ireland. If they wish to make that official, by requesting an Irish passport, that is a cause for celebration. There is not one single person in Ireland who resents this policy or who would even have a problem with someone of Irish descent returning to live in Ireland. Again, different culture, different history, different politics.

So, far from being lax, these Irish civil servants are doing precisely what they have been asked to do.

 

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Posted (edited)

I do not see why I need marriage certificates when applying,of course this may make me a <deleted>.

 

  Grandmother born  NI (Catholic,that might help the search),gave birth to my mother(deceased), in England,..surely that is all that is needed

 

There are agencies that will track and trace for a fee

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2 hours ago, izod10 said:

I do not see why I need marriage certificates when applying,of course this may make me a <deleted>.

 

  Grandmother born  NI (Catholic,that might help the search),gave birth to my mother(deceased), in England,..surely that is all that is needed

 

There are agencies that will track and trace for a fee

Yes this is good advice, i know someone who used an agency to find all the documents he needed relating to his Grandparents. I dont think the cost was that great and he was delighted with the service. I believe he just found the agency online. However i think you will need to wait until Ireland eases lockdown as i doubt that anyone will be able to access the records office at the moment.

as someone said above if you are Irish by direct decent , ie from a parent,  who was born on the Island of  Ireland,  then you are a citizen and can apply for a passport. 

The foreign birth registration is needed first, if your parents were not born in Ireland but one or other of their parents (ie your grandparents) was Irish and born in Ireland (South or North).

The great thing about Irish citizenship (unlike say the UK) is that, once obtained, it can be passed on (without limit) through the generations  to children born outside Ireland. The proviso is that your  children must remember to register the birth of their kids (as citizens born overseas ) , and then their offspring must do the same, and so on.

If this is not done , and the line of decent goes back further than Grandparents, then the right of citizenship would be lost for future generations.

 

Edited by wordchild
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Started the birth registration for my son, my parents were Irish, 2 years ago. In January I was advised it was done just waiting for the certificate which is apparently only printed in batches once a month. Brexit and covid have really slowed the process down. 

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9 hours ago, Poet said:

There is now so much nonsense in this thread, I can only suggest that anyone wishing to apply should go directly to the Irish government website.

I don't know how many of the people posting here have actually gone through the process, but I did just a couple of years ago due to Brexit. Honestly, I think most of the posters here are googling while they type and getting confused between passport applications and the naturalisation process for people who are not of Irish descent.

I was not born in Ireland but am of Irish descent. I did not have to apply for this foreign births thing. I simply provided official copies of birth certs - no wedding certs, death certs, or anything else - and made a normal first passport application. Three weeks later I had my passport.

Pointless posting what you did a few years ago as things change here is the offical requirements

https://www.dfa.ie/passports/documentary-requirements/

It worth noting that passport photos need to be witness by a professional person with their contact details written on the back of the picture with their signature

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3 hours ago, Rawairat said:

Started the birth registration for my son, my parents were Irish, 2 years ago. In January I was advised it was done just waiting for the certificate which is apparently only printed in batches once a month. Brexit and covid have really slowed the process down. 

wow that sounds like things are really messed right now. i needed to do registration for my kids several years ago, as far as i remember the whole thing took just a few months.

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15 hours ago, vinny41 said:

Pointless posting what you did a few years ago as things change here is the offical requirements


I literally said:
 

On 4/14/2021 at 1:23 AM, Poet said:

I can only suggest that anyone wishing to apply should go directly to the Irish government website.


... so I'm not sure what you believe you are adding to the conversation.

Things change but, as far as I am aware, no one on this thread actually has a more recent experience than mine. The art of dealing with any government beaucracy is understanding that you can often get stuff through without jumping through all the hoops described in the official guidelines. Personal experiences, shared on forums, often help people to find an easier path.

Again, I actually HAVE the passport. Most of the people expressing their opinions here are also to be found expounding on every other subject discussed on this forum.

 

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9 hours ago, Pmbkk said:

If your parents are from N.I. I believe you automatically qualify as an Irish citizen - same as someone with an Irish parent/grandparent.


The best way to understand this is that, as far as the Irish constitution is concerned, the entire island of Ireland is considered to be Ireland, as it was for thousands of years before the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921. From the Irish perspective, the border is artificial and temporary. All of Ireland is Ireland.

Every sane person in Ireland understands that, at this stage, the vast majority of British people would gladly hand the six counties back but they have a legitimate obligation to the community there who claim loyality to Britain, and have sacrificed heavily in two world wars.

At some point Ireland will re-unify, there is no rush, but in the meantime all residents of the occupied territory are considered Irish citizens regardless of their background, along with their children and grandchildren. The Irish are delighted that so many hardcore unionists are now traveling or retiring to Spain on Irish passports 😄

 

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2 hours ago, Poet said:


I literally said:
 


... so I'm not sure what you believe you are adding to the conversation.

Things change but, as far as I am aware, no one on this thread actually has a more recent experience than mine. The art of dealing with any government beaucracy is understanding that you can often get stuff through without jumping through all the hoops described in the official guidelines. Personal experiences, shared on forums, often help people to find an easier path.

Again, I actually HAVE the passport. Most of the people expressing their opinions here are also to be found expounding on every other subject discussed on this forum.

 

I would suggest that @pmbkk has more recent experience that you as he is currently going through the process at the moment and we all know processes and rules change over time.

I have has an Irish passport since 1980 and recently renewed it

My sister recently applied for a Irish passport for the first time her application took 6 months because she didn't follow all the requirements as outlined in detail in the APS 2 form which you obtain from the Irish Embassy

 

Edited by vinny41
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2 hours ago, Poet said:


The best way to understand this is that, as far as the Irish constitution is concerned, the entire island of Ireland is considered to be Ireland, as it was for thousands of years before the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921. From the Irish perspective, the border is artificial and temporary. All of Ireland is Ireland.

Every sane person in Ireland understands that, at this stage, the vast majority of British people would gladly hand the six counties back but they have a legitimate obligation to the community there who claim loyality to Britain, and have sacrificed heavily in two world wars.

At some point Ireland will re-unify, there is no rush, but in the meantime all residents of the occupied territory are considered Irish citizens regardless of their background, along with their children and grandchildren. The Irish are delighted that so many hardcore unionists are now traveling or retiring to Spain on Irish passports 😄

 

  Good post

 

 However as posted earlier the holder of the Irish passport can pass his/her entitlement on forever to family, unlike the UK where it abruptly ends with death of the holder. Would have saved countless problem in the UK if implemented sooner

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 4/14/2021 at 7:29 PM, wordchild said:

wow that sounds like things are really messed right now. i needed to do registration for my kids several years ago, as far as i remember the whole thing took just a few months.

Covid and BREXIT  I guess, I should have done it years ago just too lazy

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