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Pattaya: Pit Bull tranquilized and heads for retraining after savage attack on owner


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Is that some kind of joke.... Retraining, you cannot retrain dogs like that, only answer is put it down before it kills somebody. Before anybody attacks me for that comment, i love dogs, have fiv

Retraining?.......seriously deluded.

Unfortunately true. In Germany most of these dogs are owned by "bad masters", aggressive/dangerous. Here in the village one pit bull is on my friends-list. Always running to me and enjoy bei

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37 minutes ago, jak2002003 said:

Of course dogs can just attack humans like that. It happens all the time.  Innocent humans, including children...just going about their day outside when some random dog attacks them.

 

Pitbull dogs and other fighting breed dogs can just get triggered or snap for no apparent reason. It's bred into their genetics and temperament that once that happens it's difficult to stop the attack...and the dogs loose their mind and only concentrate on trying to kill...locked on and won't stop. 

 

The guy in op seemed a good owner. It says in the report he spoilt the dog and was loving to it too much.  He was not beating, starving or abusing it..

 

It was likely a freak accident that triggered the dog to attack. This is why this breed of dog is not suitable as a family pet as if it ever does attack, however stable and nice the dog is, it will still get into that kill mode and its power and strength will ensure it inflicts serious damage.  I smaller dog or less powerful breed would be not capable of causing so much harm, even it attacked, and they can be snapped out of it, unlike the fighting dogs.

When I was 2, we went to a friends house.  They had an older German Shepard. Lovely family dog.  I was playing with it, pulling it's tail, etc.  After we left, she was on the floor and did something that obviously bothered it.  Maybe stepped on it's tail, I'm not sure what the trigger was.  It turned around and bit her on the face.  She never looked the same.  It happens.

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49 minutes ago, Jeffr2 said:

When I was 2, we went to a friends house.  They had an older German Shepard. Lovely family dog.  I was playing with it, pulling it's tail, etc.  After we left, she was on the floor and did something that obviously bothered it.  Maybe stepped on it's tail, I'm not sure what the trigger was.  It turned around and bit her on the face.  She never looked the same.  It happens.

That us such a shame.  

 

I have 3 small dogs and they would never bite anyone, or so I thought. I have had them many years and no problems.  But one developed a skin allergy that must have been very sore for it.  When I was getting her she (the most gently one) actually not my hard ...not badly...but it hurt).  It shows that all dogs have to potential to bite, no matter how well trained or how placid their temperament ia.

 

This is why I can never agree that the Pitbull dogs are safe family pets.  I don't hate the dogs or blame them, but just a small incident like my dog biting my had out of pain, would be much worse and cause more injury to someone of it was a Pitbull that did it.....simply because of its size and muscle power.  

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8 hours ago, jacko45k said:

He hasn't really got one any more has he?

 

I was commenting on the member speaking as an owner, not the deceased owner.  

 

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On 4/16/2021 at 1:57 PM, smedly said:

you cannot retrain a dog like this - how it behaves starts at a very young age 

 

 

there is only one thing you can do with this dog 

This is from a number of vets I know in Australia; If a dog bites (especially a dog past early puppy stage) then there is no option than to put it down. Once a biter another episode will follow at some stage. The owner is to blame just as much as the breed. Like it or not these breeds are for bred for killing.

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6 hours ago, jak2002003 said:

Of course dogs can just attack humans like that. It happens all the time.  Innocent humans, including children...just going about their day outside when some random dog attacks them.

 

Pitbull dogs and other fighting breed dogs can just get triggered or snap for no apparent reason. It's bred into their genetics and temperament that once that happens it's difficult to stop the attack...and the dogs loose their mind and only concentrate on trying to kill...locked on and won't stop. 

 

The guy in op seemed a good owner. It says in the report he spoilt the dog and was loving to it too much.  He was not beating, starving or abusing it..

 

It was likely a freak accident that triggered the dog to attack. This is why this breed of dog is not suitable as a family pet as if it ever does attack, however stable and nice the dog is, it will still get into that kill mode and its power and strength will ensure it inflicts serious damage.  I smaller dog or less powerful breed would be not capable of causing so much harm, even it attacked, and they can be snapped out of it, unlike the fighting dogs.

Maybe you should do some research on those attacks that happen all the time and how those dogs were brought up and raised and then come back again because there’s always more to the story than they tell you in the press. I grew up with dogs, I know lots of people who have dogs including fighting breeds and none of them just attacked for no reason. As a matter of fact their dogs never attacked anyone. They love people. It is true that a smaller dog can’t do as much damage, but again to blame the dog for the shortcomings of the owner is ridiculous. Where do you stop then? Let’s ban trucks because they do more damage than a small car? 

Also, it’s not bred into the genes of fighting dogs to just snap and go on a killing spree. That’s a myth the press wants you to believe! Go talk to a reputable breeder of these breeds. They’re easy enough to find and see what they tell you. They work with these breeds on a daily basis! The losing their mind thing is true for any dog breed. Once a dog sees red it sees red. That’s why proper training is so important. 
 

The thing with dominant dog breeds is that you can’t be soft and you can’t be spoiling your dog either. You need to be calm and assertive at all times so the dog will accept you as the leader. The same is true for any other dog breed, but with dominant breeds it is especially important! 

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8 hours ago, bobbin said:

As I posted above, I speak from many years experience owning  male Rottweiler dogs, a breed often characterized as dangerous. As I also stated, Rottweilers are working dogs, not bred for aggression. Though  who knows what is currently the breeding philosophy in areas like the American South. Dog fighting is still happening there ( NFL player Vick) and probably places in Russia etc.

 

Aggression is aggression, and pit breeds were selectively bred for this. There is no diffence between aggression towards humans and aggression toward other animals. In the case of the pit breeds, you start with an aggressive dog and attempt to socialize them to humans. But you are fighting against their nature..

 

Just a heads-up.. Dog fighting is a blood "sport" managed by humans with literally "no skin in the game". Even among ardent dog lovers, there is little love for people who promote it. As I also stated, these pit breeds are relics of an unenlightened time. and these breeds should not be promoted but rather allowed to die out..

 

I just read the follow up story.. Even the new owner admits that dogs that bite are likely to repeat the behavior. This was no bite, but a savage mauling resulting in the death of the human who had been with the dog most of it's life. At the current age of the dog, he was ready to challenge for leadership.. It's nature's way. and he was much stronger than his human owner.

 

Euthanize. By gun if necessary, as Thai vets are reluctant to euthanize even very sick dogs, where death would be a merciful end to their suffering.

 

 

I used to have a male Rottweiler as well. Best dog ever. He got on well with other dogs and he loved people. He didn’t like cats, though. I socialized that dog properly from a very early age and never had a problem.

 

i totally disagree about the aggression part. Best example is my dog, he absolutely hated cats, totally freaked out when he saw them, never showed that aggression to anyone else. And again, read up of the history of dog fighting! Dogs that attacked people in the pit were disqualified for life and they were killed and therefore not used to breed and therefore couldn’t pass on those genes. That’s a fact. Ask any responsible pit breeder and they’ll tell you that they normally love people. I’m not saying that there aren’t any irresponsible <deleted> who breed them for being aggressive towards people, but responsible breeders don’t! It’s against the nature of pitbulls to attack people. They only do that if they’re trained to do it! But you can do the same with a Labrador or a German Shepherd or a Poodle. You can literally make any dog aggressive towards people. 
 

And yeah, the people who still fight dogs don’t love their dogs and in my book they’re the lowest scum around! There’s tons of people who have non-aggressive fighting dogs and they will tell you the exact opposite when it comes to them being relics that need to be left to die out! Staffordshire Bull Terriers for example have been consistently one of the most beloved family pets in the UK ever since that breed came about, despite their fighting background! They’re known to be extremely good with people, especially kids! 
 

It’s like with guns, it’s not the guns that are dangerous, it’s the people that use them. Same goes for dogs, the way you raise them the way you have them! 
 

As far as this dog biting again goes, yeah, definitely possible. All m saying is that if this dog gets in the hands of someone who actually knows what he’s doing this dog can be trained and rehabilitated and he definitely has the potential to become a “normal” dog. That’s a fact. You don’t have to take my word for it, though. There’s enough trainers out there who rehabilitated dogs that bit people and they’re good dogs now. They’re actions speak louder than any of my words ever could. The information is out there, you just have to look for it! 

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56 minutes ago, pacovl46 said:

Maybe you should do some research on those attacks that happen all the time and how those dogs were brought up and raised and then come back again because there’s always more to the story than they tell you in the press. I grew up with dogs, I know lots of people who have dogs including fighting breeds and none of them just attacked for no reason. As a matter of fact their dogs never attacked anyone. They love people. It is true that a smaller dog can’t do as much damage, but again to blame the dog for the shortcomings of the owner is ridiculous. Where do you stop then? Let’s ban trucks because they do more damage than a small car? 

Also, it’s not bred into the genes of fighting dogs to just snap and go on a killing spree. That’s a myth the press wants you to believe! Go talk to a reputable breeder of these breeds. They’re easy enough to find and see what they tell you. They work with these breeds on a daily basis! The losing their mind thing is true for any dog breed. Once a dog sees red it sees red. That’s why proper training is so important. 
 

The thing with dominant dog breeds is that you can’t be soft and you can’t be spoiling your dog either. You need to be calm and assertive at all times so the dog will accept you as the leader. The same is true for any other dog breed, but with dominant breeds it is especially important! 

This at a biased argument from a dog lover that will never accept any negativity or concerns from rational people with no dog loving agenda. 

 

I have dogs too. They never bit anyone. But they still have potential to do it...as they have teeth and a jaw, but as they are small dogs they are not going to do any amount of damage as a pitbull. This is common sense!

 

I have been bitten by 3 dogs in my life.  2 times I did not know the dog was even there as it sneaked up with no warning or barking and bit me.  Another time the dog was barking when I was walking past, and then acted like it was wandering odd and relaxing, before it attacked. 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, pacovl46 said:

I used to have a male Rottweiler as well. Best dog ever. He got on well with other dogs and he loved people. He didn’t like cats, though. I socialized that dog properly from a very early age and never had a problem.

 

i totally disagree about the aggression part. Best example is my dog, he absolutely hated cats, totally freaked out when he saw them, never showed that aggression to anyone else. And again, read up of the history of dog fighting! Dogs that attacked people in the pit were disqualified for life and they were killed and therefore not used to breed and therefore couldn’t pass on those genes. That’s a fact. Ask any responsible pit breeder and they’ll tell you that they normally love people. I’m not saying that there aren’t any irresponsible <deleted> who breed them for being aggressive towards people, but responsible breeders don’t! It’s against the nature of pitbulls to attack people. They only do that if they’re trained to do it! But you can do the same with a Labrador or a German Shepherd or a Poodle. You can literally make any dog aggressive towards people. 
 

And yeah, the people who still fight dogs don’t love their dogs and in my book they’re the lowest scum around! There’s tons of people who have non-aggressive fighting dogs and they will tell you the exact opposite when it comes to them being relics that need to be left to die out! Staffordshire Bull Terriers for example have been consistently one of the most beloved family pets in the UK ever since that breed came about, despite their fighting background! They’re known to be extremely good with people, especially kids! 
 

It’s like with guns, it’s not the guns that are dangerous, it’s the people that use them. Same goes for dogs, the way you raise them the way you have them! 
 

As far as this dog biting again goes, yeah, definitely possible. All m saying is that if this dog gets in the hands of someone who actually knows what he’s doing this dog can be trained and rehabilitated and he definitely has the potential to become a “normal” dog. That’s a fact. You don’t have to take my word for it, though. There’s enough trainers out there who rehabilitated dogs that bit people and they’re good dogs now. They’re actions speak louder than any of my words ever could. The information is out there, you just have to look for it! 

I agree with much of this.. Big learning curve (pack behaviour) with my first Rottie. We got him at 1 year old from a gay man.. not much exposure to women. He and I had no problem. The wife not so much. He would always listen to her but sometimes liked to show her that he was number 2 in the pack and she was number 3. No outright danger but subtle things. Even when the 3 us were out walking in the off-leash areas, whenever my wife and I were walking close together he would often move in between us.. Unfortunately he passed from lymph node cancer at 7 years of age.

 

The second Rottie we  raised from 8 weeks of age. Lots of socialization with women, children and other dogs.. My friend owned his sire and was active in Schutzhund training, so after he was a little over a year old we we started with that training. Very good training for any dog but especially larger dogs. Schutzhund is not training for agression but for control.. 

 

But I still maintain this particular dog needs to be euthanized.  Don't waste time. Of course he might respond to direction from a dominant owner but why should he get that chance? He's a killer after all, not "just" a biter.

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I am hoping that the owner has a change of heart, and says send the dog to dog heaven. 

  A bit of lead in the dogs brain would be what I would have asked to happen if I was the owner.

   I have owned 6 dogs, but I was never attacked by any of them. I did do in 2 of my dogs as

they did get aggressive, and one nipped my neighbor, so I shot it in front of him. Good thing I lived in the

country side at the time.

Geezer

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7 hours ago, Tropposurfer said:

This is from a number of vets I know in Australia; If a dog bites (especially a dog past early puppy stage) then there is no option than to put it down. Once a biter another episode will follow at some stage. The owner is to blame just as much as the breed. Like it or not these breeds are for bred for killing.

yes most people know that but I disagree with your last comment - they are not killers out of the box, that has to be trained into them.

 

a dog is influenced from very early to be what they are going to be, they are not like cats which are driven on instinct and cannot be trained away from that preprogramed profile - dogs have that too but not so strong, dogs can be trained, dogs are also more intelligent and emotional which is why they make great pets and loyal companions.

 

We don't know how this dog was steered, I suspect it was not in a good way    

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They are powerful beasts that need to be properly trained.

They have a bite force between 235 - 315 PSI.

Just like us intelligent apes, some of them have mental and emotional disorders.

If the healthy ones get annoyed, they emit a low warning growl - "Thanks for the warning."

Case in point, I was friends with Dada, a Thai family's  120 pound pit bull. I brought him soup bones, and gave him 10 minute scratches. We were pals. One day the father was not in his moto repair shop. I was talking to his wife and young son, when Dada walks up to them, looks at me, and does a short growl. In other words, he was letting me know that he was protecting his people. The woman did not know me, so she was nervous, and Dada sensed her discomfort. I said my usual "Dada dee, Dada dee", and left. If I had not listened to him, and had moved closer to her, then he would have escalated. We remained friends, and he still got, and enjoyed,  his treats.

 

The silent ones are much harder to predict; consequently, I give them treats, and let them come to me.

 

If dangerous dogs are snarling at you, and you are being prevented from walking away, crouch down. If the growling continues, slowly lie down, and become docile. Now you are no longer perceived as a threat to the pack in general, and the dominant male in particular.

 

15 Dogs You Should Fear the Most.mp4_snapshot_07.20_[2021.04.15_18.17.21].jpg

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23 minutes ago, rcuthbert said:

They are powerful beasts that need to be properly trained.

They have a bite force between 235 - 315 PSI.

Just like us intelligent apes, some of them have mental and emotional disorders.

If the healthy ones get annoyed, they emit a low warning growl - "Thanks for the warning."

Case in point, I was friends with Dada, a Thai family's  120 pound pit bull. I brought him soup bones, and gave him 10 minute scratches. We were pals. One day the father was not in his moto repair shop. I was talking to his wife and young son, when Dada walks up to them, looks at me, and does a short growl. In other words, he was letting me know that he was protecting his people. The woman did not know me, so she was nervous, and Dada sensed her discomfort. I said my usual "Dada dee, Dada dee", and left. If I had not listened to him, and had moved closer to her, then he would have escalated. We remained friends, and he still got, and enjoyed,  his treats.

 

The silent ones are much harder to predict; consequently, I give them treats, and let them come to me.

 

If dangerous dogs are snarling at you, and you are being prevented from walking away, crouch down. If the growling continues, slowly lie down, and become docile. Now you are no longer perceived as a threat to the pack in general, and the dominant male in particular.

 

15 Dogs You Should Fear the Most.mp4_snapshot_07.20_[2021.04.15_18.17.21].jpg

Good lord.. like a Rottweiler on steroids.

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On 4/16/2021 at 1:32 PM, pacovl46 said:

Spoken like someone who knows nothing about dogs! 

Yes, you are right! You know nothing about dangerous dogs!! Heads in the sand are often convinced they know better!

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15 hours ago, smedly said:

yes most people know that but I disagree with your last comment - they are not killers out of the box, that has to be trained into them.

 

a dog is influenced from very early to be what they are going to be, they are not like cats which are driven on instinct and cannot be trained away from that preprogramed profile - dogs have that too but not so strong, dogs can be trained, dogs are also more intelligent and emotional which is why they make great pets and loyal companions.

 

We don't know how this dog was steered, I suspect it was not in a good way    

Finally someone who gets it!!! And by the way, aggression can be trained away. That’s a fact and if a dog gets proper training an rehabilitation you can get them to the point where they will not bite again.. It takes time, though, and you need to know what you’re doing, but it’s definitely possible! 

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2 hours ago, Paul DS said:

Yes, you are right! You know nothing about dangerous dogs!! Heads in the sand are often convinced they know better!

😁😁😁😁

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22 hours ago, bobbin said:

I agree with much of this.. Big learning curve (pack behaviour) with my first Rottie. We got him at 1 year old from a gay man.. not much exposure to women. He and I had no problem. The wife not so much. He would always listen to her but sometimes liked to show her that he was number 2 in the pack and she was number 3. No outright danger but subtle things. Even when the 3 us were out walking in the off-leash areas, whenever my wife and I were walking close together he would often move in between us.. Unfortunately he passed from lymph node cancer at 7 years of age.

 

The second Rottie we  raised from 8 weeks of age. Lots of socialization with women, children and other dogs.. My friend owned his sire and was active in Schutzhund training, so after he was a little over a year old we we started with that training. Very good training for any dog but especially larger dogs. Schutzhund is not training for agression but for control.. 

 

But I still maintain this particular dog needs to be euthanized.  Don't waste time. Of course he might respond to direction from a dominant owner but why should he get that chance? He's a killer after all, not "just" a biter.

In regards to your wife, I’m assuming that she didn’t behave like a pack leader or at the very least sent mixed signals on which the dog picked up, which is so easy to do. The number one mistake dog owners make is making a fuss about the dog when they come home from work because they feel bad about having left the dog alone all day. This is exactly how a follower behaves when the pack leader comes home, they make a massive fuss while he’s just standing there, completely ignoring everyone in the pack and let them do their thing! Another common mistake is that they let the dog in and out of the house before them, this would never happen in a true dog pack, another one is letting the dog up on the couch or on the bed with you! This would also never fly!  And the list goes on and on and on. Now this isn’t really a problem if you have a dog that’s submissive by nature, but in dominant dog breeds this will definitely lead to the dog seeing itself above that particular person. You should’ve immediately corrected that behavior each and every time.

 

Yeah, unfortunately cancer is a thing in that breed. It might be the vaccines or all the BS that’s in the commercially available dog food. A friend of mine had two and they both died from cancer around the same age as yours. It fricking sucks! 
 

Rottweilers are awesome dogs, but as you said, proper training is mandatory! 
 

Why shouldn’t the dog get a second chance, if it wasn’t his fault that it ended this way? You don’t send the gun on the electric chair, do you? Aggression of any kind can be trained away and any living being on this planet has the right to be here as much as any other! 
 

 

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On 4/15/2021 at 8:56 PM, Excel said:

Sorry disagree, Pit Bulls are not suitable pets and should all be euthanised.

I have encountered dozens of them in my work.

Most are sweet and gentle, I have only encountered 1 or 2 aggressive pitbulls.

My upstairs neighbor has one and it is quiet and gentle and friendly.

But I always wonder if they are ticking time bombs because when they are aggressive they are terrifying.

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21 hours ago, rcuthbert said:

f dangerous dogs are snarling at you, and you are being prevented from walking away, crouch down. If the growling continues, slowly lie down, and become docile

Should I roll onto my back and show my belly, a classic submissive dog pattern, then lick the other dog's face? Really, I think stay clear..... that dog is a potential danger. 

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1 hour ago, jacko45k said:

Should I roll onto my back and show my belly, a classic submissive dog pattern, then lick the other dog's face? Really, I think stay clear..... that dog is a potential danger. 

Just be feces-ious with them - then they will leave you alone.

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12 minutes ago, rcuthbert said:

Just be feces-ious with them - then they will leave you alone.

Stay clear I say. 

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4 minutes ago, jacko45k said:

Stay clear I say. 

If you are surrounded by savage dogs, one's only hope of surviving is to lie down, and cover your throat and face.

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Just now, rcuthbert said:

If you are surrounded by savage dogs, one's only hope of surviving is to lie down, and cover your throat and face.

Yes, I shall keep that in mind..... heaven help us when we have more pit-bull genes in the pack at the bottom of the street. 

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13 hours ago, pacovl46 said:

In regards to your wife, I’m assuming that she didn’t behave like a pack leader or at the very least sent mixed signals on which the dog picked up, which is so easy to do. The number one mistake dog owners make is making a fuss about the dog when they come home from work because they feel bad about having left the dog alone all day. This is exactly how a follower behaves when the pack leader comes home, they make a massive fuss while he’s just standing there, completely ignoring everyone in the pack and let them do their thing! Another common mistake is that they let the dog in and out of the house before them, this would never happen in a true dog pack, another one is letting the dog up on the couch or on the bed with you! This would also never fly!  And the list goes on and on and on. Now this isn’t really a problem if you have a dog that’s submissive by nature, but in dominant dog breeds this will definitely lead to the dog seeing itself above that particular person. You should’ve immediately corrected that behavior each and every time.

 

Yeah, unfortunately cancer is a thing in that breed. It might be the vaccines or all the BS that’s in the commercially available dog food. A friend of mine had two and they both died from cancer around the same age as yours. It fricking sucks! 
 

Rottweilers are awesome dogs, but as you said, proper training is mandatory! 
 

Why shouldn’t the dog get a second chance, if it wasn’t his fault that it ended this way? You don’t send the gun on the electric chair, do you? Aggression of any kind can be trained away and any living being on this planet has the right to be here as much as any other! 
 

 

As I said, my friend was active in Schutzhund and we had several conversations with him and other trainers about the first Rottie's behaviour. A key point was the dog's lack of exposure to women in that first year of life. He, of course, could smell that she was female..

 

Pack behaviour was explained to us. The dog accepted me the pack leader and the fact that my wife was part of the pack. There was no need to challenge her as she was not the leader and packs always have female members. But this dog had not been socialized to accept human females as ranking higher in the pack.. Fortunately, his temperament was not dangerous.

 

You have been a good attorney for the accused dog, but the verdict has never been in question.

 

To address your last paragraph.. A gun is inanimate. Training to control aggression is of course possible. Training a dog that has killed it's owner is a foolish endeavour. Too much risk of a re-occurrence and in our real world human life will be the priority..

 

I have, until now, avoided pointing out the obvious.. That man's last 5 minutes of life would have been horrific. Bloody, painful, and noisy, a mix of screams and growls..

 

My personal verdict, and the overwhelming consensus is euthanasia.

 

A life for a life.,

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I lost internet just after posting so I could not edit my post..

 

As the owner died in hospital, I should have said the time period of the attack..

 

Hopefully less than 5 minutes.

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I love dogs, and they love me. I even had my own dog pack that obeyed my commands, and followed me everywhere. However, If one of them had savaged a human, I would have euthanized him by putting barbiturates in his food. Sometimes I have to override my emotions with logic.
 

RIP to the owner.

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8 hours ago, bobbin said:

As I said, my friend was active in Schutzhund and we had several conversations with him and other trainers about the first Rottie's behaviour. A key point was the dog's lack of exposure to women in that first year of life. He, of course, could smell that she was female..

 

Pack behaviour was explained to us. The dog accepted me the pack leader and the fact that my wife was part of the pack. There was no need to challenge her as she was not the leader and packs always have female members. But this dog had not been socialized to accept human females as ranking higher in the pack.. Fortunately, his temperament was not dangerous.

 

You have been a good attorney for the accused dog, but the verdict has never been in question.

 

To address your last paragraph.. A gun is inanimate. Training to control aggression is of course possible. Training a dog that has killed it's owner is a foolish endeavour. Too much risk of a re-occurrence and in our real world human life will be the priority..

 

I have, until now, avoided pointing out the obvious.. That man's last 5 minutes of life would have been horrific. Bloody, painful, and noisy, a mix of screams and growls..

 

My personal verdict, and the overwhelming consensus is euthanasia.

 

A life for a life.,

Just because the overwhelming consensus is euthanasia doesn’t mean that that’s right. But hey, to each their own. 
 

And yes, definitely not a nice way to go, no doubt about that! 

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