Jump to content
Thai Visa Forum

Lucid Dreaming and Sleep Paralysis


Recommended Posts

4 minutes ago, Don Dunkelblum said:

I had the symptoms of sleep paralysis once in my life after surgery and 'waking up' in the recovery room of the hospital, awake but not possible to move or talk  for half a minute.

My question is if this could have been avoided by the 

1 hour ago, Pilotman said:

Sheryl, I have read (google) that there is no underlying medical condition that helps to trigger it, is that true? 

 

Correct. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, WineOh said:

I used to have these in my 20's after a heavy weekend on, well, let's say certain 'substances.'

They usually happened on a Sunday night..

 

Not had them since I knocked all that on the head a while back.

 

Kinda miss them though.

I once turned a light on, flew around my bedroom and was about to look in the mirror when I suddenly woke up.

Out of body experience - nice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Happens to me every once in a while. I’ve learned to go with the flow & it’s quite cool. 
Sometimes I hear grunting like there’s some kind of animal next to the bed. 
This is ‘Incubus’, a kind of sleep demon but is harmless 

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, connda said:

Roll with it.  If your lucid, relax and enjoy manipulating the dream space.

 

Doesn't work like that. Hugely disturbing and frightening being inside a nightmare and you can't wake up.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, 1FinickyOne said:

sure?

Sheryl and Google agree and say not. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

OP, I haven't experienced anything as extreme as you describe, but over the years I have identified that a couple of foods consumed in the evening gives me really horrific nightmares.

Apples in particular, If I eat an apple in the evening/night, horrific nightmares. More recently I was drinking these zero calorie Thai herb drinks from supermarket and eventually worked out they were trigging nightmares.

It may be something to consider, skipping all food in the evenings and see if there is an association.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Since I had a small fracture of my skull (had a scan) 2 years ago, I get off to sleep straight away for about 5 hours and dream every night, every dream is about someone I know/the past

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one about once a month almost exactly as you describe. It's impossible to remain calm because I feel that if I don't wake up, I'll die. I've had them for as long as I can remember, they're horrible.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 5/7/2021 at 1:03 PM, Saltire said:

Not had the paralysis but up till a year ago i suffered for decades from REM Sleep Disorder where you physically act out your dreams, for example in the dream a dog is lunging at me so I kick out, often kicking the wall. Worst was dreaming I fell off a bridge annd literally fell out the bed.

 

For some reason it has not occured in a year or so, but to be sure I have had to get used to facing away from my sleeping partner. I've never been in a real fight in my life, but have punched or kicked all 3 wives at some time.

 

Perhaps it will just pass too, but I agree that would not be a nice feeling.

 

Funnilly enough I just stopped snoring for no reason too, so the wife is happy.

 

Good luck on finding a solution.

 

Ditto, I won't go into detail as you have described it accurately. I've never been able to establish what triggers it and the occurrence intervals  vary as well. I have suffered from Pilotmam's sleep problem in the past but not for a few years.  Other than the annoying need to relieve myself in the night I don't suffer any other problems and consider myself lucky to have a restful  night on most occasions.

 

The only worrying part is that the vivid dream situation has a link to Parkinsons, although I don't have any family history as such.

 

On a brighter note I read your 2nd paragraph final sentence '...but have punched or kicked all 3 wives at some time.' as but have punched or  kicked all 3 wives at the same time which sounded quite an exciting prospect.

Edited by DaLa
Spelling mistake.
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a drug that can stimulate lucid dreaming:

 

Though not approved by the FDA, there is interest in the recreational use of galantamine for its purported ability to induce lucid dreaming. One study has provided some limited evidence for this practice, although it is notable that its authors have financial ties to the Lucidity Institute.[41]


My personal experience:

I had a few months of lucid dreaming back in 2010 or 2011.  Too many diabetes pills from Bummyrod.  When your blood sugar gets too low; at least for me; got to dreaming up a storm and remembering.  You also sleepwalk.  I'm lucky I didn't fall down the stairs.

 

I cut my dosage of the five diabetes pills and emailed my doctor in Bangkok.  Prior to this I fell in the bedroom giving myself a bloody nose.  I had apocalyptic dreams about the end of the world, very horrific.  At one point I did not recog-nize my wife.  My lucid dreams stopped when my blood sugar, glucose, returned to normal.  I recall getting a glucose reading of 42.

Terry

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/7/2021 at 12:55 PM, Surelynot said:

Not research it, but it crossed my mind........... is a second of dreamtime equal to second of real time?

 

I have huge, complex, detailed dreams that would seem to be hours long.......but maybe they only last for minutes or even seconds in "dreamtime".

 

There was a science fiction story about this once.

 

It was about teleportation. It worked on animals, but humans seemed to go mad. Turns out, because of some quirk of time and space, although teleportation was instantaneous to an outside observer, for the person teleported it took about 100 years.

 

So they were in a sort of limbo, alone with their thoughts and with no sensory input, for 100 years. But their body did not age at all.

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Never had sleep paralysis but a number of lucid dreams. The first one occurred unexpectantly when I was in my early 20's. Since I did not know anything about lucidity back then it was an overwhelmingly big surprize. I then read books of Stephen LaBerge and joined the Lucidity Institute. I even constantly trained myself, following the recommendations of Stephen LaBerge and using even his "Dream Light" device which measures rapid eye movements if they occur and then emitts a light pattern to the closed eyes that was supposed to let you recognize that you are dreaming. But this has never really worked.

 

What did work though is the technique called "reality check" - with absolutely stunning results. It is nothing more than you gaining the habit to ask yourself randomly during the day if you are dreaming - even if you seem to be absolutely sure that you are not and perform a check - one example: You look at your watch at the date (numbers), close your eyes and then look again - if the numbers are still the same then you are probably not dreaming - if they are not - you are dreaming and then the full consciousness that this is a dream instead of a waking state sets in. You think that you will know anyway for sure at all times ? You are mistaken:

 

I was once sucessful performing this test while I absolutely thought I would NOT be dreaming. But I was. This was an absolutely stunning overwhelming experience. All this experiences are always accompanied by an immense joy and contentment.

Edited by moogradod
Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously not sleep paralysis it's aliens having taken you for study have just returned you to your bed. The juice is just wearing off(Heh heh)

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Dionigi said:

Obviously not sleep paralysis it's aliens having taken you for study have just returned you to your bed.......

Maybe its even worse ? Actually I am an alien - disguised perfectly as a TV member. You would never believe it even if I just told you right straight away - or would you ? You don't - right ? Thats how good my disguise is. There are many of us by the way 👽👽😆

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Pilotman I have this since childhood (in my 50s now) and it comes and goes in phases. Sometimes it happens every night, sometimes I'll go months without it. Much of it is anxiety related. A British GP described it to me once in Hypnopompic and Hypnagogic terms (yes, they're real words). Basically I'll wake up in the night, sometimes in a state of paralysis, sometimes lucid and able to control my movements, but still in a sleep (a kind of adult night terror). Often I will be convinced I am on the edge of death and screaming in terror.

 

My wife and kids have got used to it now. It's a very unpleasant experience, but I can assure you, there is no danger to your health. PM me if you want to talk more, privately.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Led Lolly Yellow Lolly said:

@Pilotman I have this since childhood (in my 50s now) and it comes and goes in phases. Sometimes it happens every night, sometimes I'll go months without it. Much of it is anxiety related. A British GP described it to me once in Hypnopompic and Hypnagogic terms (yes, they're real words). Basically I'll wake up in the night, sometimes in a state of paralysis, sometimes lucid and able to control my movements, but still in a sleep (a kind of adult night terror). Often I will be convinced I am on the edge of death and screaming in terror.

 

My wife and kids have got used to it now. It's a very unpleasant experience, but I can assure you, there is no danger to your health. PM me if you want to talk more, privately.

sounds even more frightening than my experience. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have studied this for years. I have (In my opinion) very good facebook post on this I could share with you through PM.  The catatonia or sleep paralysis you describe is very likely not pathological. The lucid state is called hypnagogia. This is also the lucid dreaming state that numerous shamanic, Vedic, Taoist, and Buddhist traditions aim for. It is essentially a "mind awake, body asleep" state as Robert Monroe described in Journeys Out of the Body. No, one needn't have an out of body experience. 

 

This has taken place in all peoples in all ages. It happened to me most vividly five years ago in Cardiff. I was overwhelmed by the sense of something terrible, hauntingly dangerous in the room. However, I was aware I was semi sleeping, I do not believe in scary <deleted>, and what was going on. I desperately tried to rock myself to arousal- my body would not respond. I was mentally yelling and rocking myself until slowly I became fully awake. I committed to learning more.

 

See the online research PDF the "Ominous Numinous," among others. The hag upon the chest, the peripheral dark agent in the room, etc., are common complaints for thousands of years. Essentially, this is - in mine and the essay author's opinion- a short circuit in the lucid alarm. The body is asleep but something gets crossed triggering an alarm. There is no threat detectable, but the mind produces an archetypal image. It is really a universal experience. If you, I would seek to cultivate this ability. Practitioners of lucid dreaming, particularly the Tibetan tradition, quickly master their fears and it is irrelevant, and they conduct Bardo meditations and other psychomachia (Soul Work) in this very state. Good luck. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/7/2021 at 4:00 AM, Pilotman said:

I guess that the terror of this, and terror is the right word I think, is that people in a coma, or in a supposed 'permanent vegetative state' may be  experiencing  this 24/7.  That is a truly awful prospect. I'm probably making too much of this, but last  night's episode was not a pleasant experience at all. 

That is a horrifying prospect (about people in a coma/vegetative state.)

 

I realize this is a totally different circumstance, but I became alert while under anaesthesia.  I was paralyzed -- I couldn't even open my eyes -- but I vividly had all my physical senses including the full physical sensation of the tubes down my throat, my inability to breathe on my own, and the doctor snipping bits of my lungs (it was during a lung biopsy.)  I do not wish that upon anybody, but apparently it happens in a small percentage of cases.

 

In the case of a coma/vegetative state I cannot imagine being mentally alert, fully understanding the situation, and knowing that it is open-ended, i.e. no end in sight.   At some point does insanity set in with emotional detachment?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/8/2021 at 1:34 PM, peleid said:

Since I had a small fracture of my skull (had a scan) 2 years ago, I get off to sleep straight away for about 5 hours and dream every night, every dream is about someone I know/the past

 

The past can haunt - I get dreams about my old job, old boss, things that never actually happened but feel so real. Horrible I'd love a 'wipe clean' switch.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The body is designed to not be able to move all that much while we are sleeping. I am not talking about "tossing and turning" but rather, larger more distinct movements... To get "normal" movement would be way too dangerous. 

 

So, to some extent, everyone is paralyzed when sleeping. To some extent...

 

So, it could be very common to have a dream where a person experiences themselves not being able to raise their hands to protect themselves, as they get repeatedly slapped in the face by someone. But you have to "remember" this is in your dream, and not in real life. 

 

You could of course also imagine yourself being Bruce Lee, and fending off 3 attackers at the same time. But again, this is "only" in your dream.

 

So in your bed, on such and such time and date, you are indeed not capable of moving around all that much, and defending yourself, until AFTER you wake up.

 

With lucid dreaming, you realize you are dreaming, but you stay in the dream, and then you orchestrate the dream from inside the dream. Usually to do this takes a good deal of training, and indeed there are training courses out there.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I experienced this twice, 30 years ago.  Awoke and couldn’t move, saw shadows in the room and thought I wasn’t alone.  It was frightening because I wasn’t aware what it was.  But it’s not unusual and hasn’t happened to me since then.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

As there has been mention of night terrors ...

I don't recall having any sleep paralysis, perhaps some lucid dreaming.  I do have what I call nightmares, that are PTSD related to my service in Vietnam.   I feel, myself being struck or stabbed.  Does not hurt, but I feel the hit.  Black void all around me and being chased by people.  Related to being hunted by 3 NVA soldiers with fixed bayonets!

But still, nothing as terrifying as having night terrors as a child.  Most of what you read on the internet about a child having night terrors, say, that the child does not remember.  

A terrifying unknown black and gray that attacked me continuously.  Night terrors that occurred  several times, more than 65 years ago, but I still remember it. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting that the previous poster mentions PTSD.

 

I just looked up sleep paralysis and found this:

You’re more likely to encounter sleep paralysis if you’re under a lot of stress or have experienced threatening or traumatic life events. People with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), for example, are much more likely than the average person to have episodes of sleep paralysis.

 

It's possible that unresolved emotional/psychological issues that are buried in our subconscious come to the surface during sleep. If I were you, I would consider going to see a psychotherapist. And there shouldn't be any stigma associated with that. 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

All of what has happened to us, and all that we imagine, will, or did, happen to us is stored in the subconscious. Very often, when someone thinks they are awake and unable to move, etc. in actuality they are still sleeping.

 

You see this kind of thing regularly if you practice lucid dreaming. You think you are dreaming, when you are not, and you think you are not dreaming when you are....

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, charliebadenhop said:

All of what has happened to us, and all that we imagine, will, or did, happen to us is stored in the subconscious. Very often, when someone thinks they are awake and unable to move, etc. in actuality they are still sleeping.

 

You see this kind of thing regularly if you practice lucid dreaming. You think you are dreaming, when you are not, and you think you are not dreaming when you are....

My one and only incidence was during the day when all the family were preparing Sunday lunch............there was no doubt in my mind I was fully conscious and experiencing real time/real life events around me.......but as you say 'very often' people are just sleeping.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...