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Off topic tangential posts removed and responses to them.

 

Stay on topic please !

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13 hours ago, Peterw42 said:

The OP is asking how to retire in Thailand, he isn't asking fi he should.

 

There is a world of difference between taking holidays in Thailand and living here on retirement, as I can vouch for on the basis of personal experience!

 

33 minutes ago, northsouthdevide said:

Preferably a new passport with extra pages.

 

Agreed - renewing British passports from Thailand is IMHO a right PITA.

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Posted (edited)

OP, The post earlier by @BritTim is perfect advice.

Added note to what he already mentioned. It's not always easy to open bank account and has become more difficult. Another poster some time ago basically did BritTim road map. That guy used an agent (think Siam legal) to arrange bank account and reported that it was simple straightforward process.

Be aware that you need to show that money (800k) came from o/s on the day you apply for your non o retirement at immigration

Edited by DrJack54
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All the information you need to guide you through the process of getting an Non-Imm OA visa can be found on the Thai Embassy website.  Or, if you decide a Thai Elite visa is a better way to go, their website can guide you. 

That said, I very much agree with advice above to not burn any bridges back to the UK, just in case long-term life in Thailand turns out to be not as wonderful as you expected.  For example, if you own a house you might consider renting it out rather than selling it, at least for the first few years you're in Thailand.

 

As for a September move, if it were me, I'd hold off until next year, or at least until the COVID-19 vaccination situation in Thailand is much more advanced.

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Also you could consider getting a non-immigrant 'O' 3 month retirement visa in the UK. Maybe a bit more onerous to get than a visa exempt, but would skip the conversion process in Thailand. That would get you 3 months to arrange bank account, transfer money in (has to be 2 months before applying for your 12 month extension). 

Be aware that the area you wish to stay may have slight variations on how rules are applied - someone may enlighten you on local issues.

 

Bank accounts - in my experience branches in shopping malls are the most irrational at applying rules on opening accounts and also over the counter services.

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Posted (edited)

If you havent visit any other asian country do so! watch what other country's have to offer! Many expat's want to chance to some other location than Thailand. Every place have down sides. Thailand is not paradise but one of most safe country in asia! All come to that what you are looking for!

Edited by 2 is 1
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I would advise the "test trip".  2-3 months minimum; book the sort of accommodation you would like to retire to, live as close to the lifestyle you want as you can.  Keep records of every Baht spent, adjusting for when short term cost's more (like renting, not buying, PAYG for internet, not contract, etc.).

Then, once you're back home for a few weeks and can think objectively, is this what you want?  Can you live like that?  Can you afford it long-term?

 

This is what I did pre-covid.  I moved here, no regrets so far.

 

Of course, Covid is the kicker right now, if you can, maybe wait until things stabilise.

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20 hours ago, Grecian said:

I have 800k needed. That's about as far as my knowledge goes.

Can someone please explain the most efficient way to go? 

I'm hoping for a September move.

@BritTimhas given an excellent advice, plus the other advice about getting fresh 10-year validity passport before your move...👍

 

The one year so called "retirement visa" non-immigrant O-A is little more difficult than the more often used non-immigrant O-visa, suggest by BritTim, as O-A requires a mandatory 400k+40k baht health insurance. Health insurance is a good thing to have, but you have more freedom with an O-visa and just doing the annual extensions of stay. The major benefit with the O-A visa is that you don't need a deposit in a Thai bank.

 

I've been living here since 2005, annual extensions since my 2006 O-visa, and I just keep 800k baht permanent in a separate fixed bank-account. If you can afford that, it's easy to extend permission to stay; just withdraw the annual interest but always keep a balance of the 800, you shall anyway have minimum 400k in the account up to 7 month of the year.

 

Covid-situation might make travelling a bit more complicated with documents and extra Covid-insurance, but you could consider to enter via Phuket if you are vaccinated.

 

Welcome to Land-of-Smiles...🙂

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Posted (edited)

I don't know when the OP was last in Thailand or where in Thailand he is considering moving to, but things have changed substantially since the pandemic started. Moving to Thailand on a more permanent basis might be postponed to the visit after next. Outside of Bangkok its all quite different.

Edited by SheungWan
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16 hours ago, Robin said:

Been in Thailand for over 6yrs as a retiree with Thai wife.  Most difficult thing is communicating with Thai officialdom.  If you are not fluent in Thai, then you will need a trusted Thai companion to help you.

Think about the rules for owning, or not owning property and goods in Thailand.  My experience is that the housing market, such as it is, is far from liquid.  If you suddenly decide that you want out, then it might not be possible to sell your assets and leave.  A sensible attitude is that what you have in Thailand will have to stay in Thailand.

If you can afford to do so, keep an escape route in UK.  Do not sell your UK property but only rent it out.  At least you will have somewhere to go if you have to leave Thailand.

My experience of Thai officialdom is that if you obey the rules, you should not have any problems.  

Medical care in Thailand is not cheap but far superior to that offered by NHS

He is asking about visas not escape plans. 

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12 hours ago, SheungWan said:

I don't know when the OP was last in Thailand or where in Thailand he is considering moving to, but things have changed substantially since the pandemic started. Moving to Thailand on a more permanent basis might be postponed to the visit after next. Outside of Bangkok its all quite different.

     I disagree.  I would not say things have changed 'substantially' with the lifestyle in Thailand of my partner and me.  Other than international travel, the things we did before covid, we still do.  The life we lived before covid, we still live.  Covid has meant some changes, of course, but that would be true in most places around the World.  

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4 minutes ago, BritManToo said:

I used to go swimming with my family every week ........ swimming pool closed.

I used to go to the lakeside restaurant for lunch .......... all restaurants closed.

 

I guess if you never leave your home, nothing much has changed.

But being retired in Thailand is still better than being retired in the UK.

      Yes, things are closed at the moment.  My swimming pool is closed, too.  As are my favorite restaurants.  That doesn't mean they will be closed forever.  They also closed last year, then they opened again--and I was back to swimming every day and going to restaurants, and so on.  I look forward to the lockdown being over--and it eventually will be.  Being retired in Thailand is better than being retired in the US, for me.

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as hotandsticky says  but done live here alone you need a thai to translate or your in trouble with the communication ! 

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Sorry to leach on this thread. 
Question on non O-A possibility of getting almost 2 years of it. 
I understand if it is timed properly, re-entering before the expiry date gets another year. Does this require that the insurance also gets renewed? 
Also, if you did get in with a year of ‘bonus’. Can one still leave and return using the re-entry permit or if you leave, you’d lose the visa and have to start all over again?

My plan of doing this would not be earlier than June 2022, so hopefully, coming and going would be easier by then.

 

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7 minutes ago, ryanqqq said:

I understand if it is timed properly, re-entering before the expiry date gets another year. Does this require that the insurance also gets renewed? 

You need the medical insurance for every entry allowed by the OA via.

 

7 minutes ago, ryanqqq said:

Also, if you did get in with a year of ‘bonus’. Can one still leave and return using the re-entry permit or if you leave, you’d lose the visa and have to start all over again?

You need a re-entry permit to keep the extra year valid when you enter the country.

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