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mpdkorat

Where Can I Buy Lard In Thailand

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I'm trying to make authentic pork pies, but need pork lard to get the right taste. Anyone know where I can buy lard in Thailand. All I have been able to find so far is 'shortening' made from Palm oil.

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They do sell Crisco, Im not exactly sure what its made of, but It made to be used in baking recipes

Greg

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Lard is sold as a German delicacy under the name "Schmalz" in both Friendship and Best supermarkets in Pattaya.

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They do sell Crisco, Im not exactly sure what its made of, but It made to be used in baking recipes

Greg

I have been told about Crisco it's a well know US brand name, but I believe it is made from vegetable oil and is indeed a shortening. It might work with pork pies, but I would like to at least try to get Lard first.

Is Crisco easy to obtain in Thailand?

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Lard is sold as a German delicacy under the name "Schmalz" in both Friendship and Best supermarkets in Pattaya.

Thanks PC that good news, just need to get someone to run the guantlet to Pattaya to get it.

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Lard is sold as a German delicacy under the name "Schmalz" in both Friendship and Best supermarkets in Pattaya.

Thanks PC that good news, just need to get someone to run the guantlet to Pattaya to get it.

I'm sure you can find it in any supermarket catering to Germans.

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Is Crisco easy to obtain in Thailand?

I picked up some at Tesco Lotus. Not cheap though.

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Mpdkorat; as you so rightly say in the title of this thread, lard is rendered pork fat. So why don't you render your own pork fat? I've been rendering (or more correctly, my wife has been rendering) locally purchased pork fat for years. Not only do I use it, soley, when making hot water crust pastry for raised pork pies but I also use it hasip/hasip with butter when making short crust pastry for pies/pasties and savoury flans.

Most locally-raised pork is sold minus the skin/ fat which is sold separately at approx 20baht per kg and is readily available. Cut up the skin/fat into small cubes, tip it into a wok and fry it slowly (stirring occasionally) until you are left with a pool of clear yellow liquid in the bottom. Drain off the liquid into a heat proof container, let it cool and then pour it into a plastic container (I use ice cream cartons). You can then leave it in the deep freeze compartment of your fridge to solidify. Once it has hardened you have "lard". What is left in the wok is known as "pork scratchings" to the British pub-goer.

When you make hot water crust pastry, cut off a lump of rendered pork fat (aka "lard") from your stash, bring it to the boil with the required amount of water and quickly pour it on to your flour and start stirring rapidly with a wooden spoon. It works every time, believe me. :o

I'm not a professional pastry chef, but a they say "(k)need is the mother of invention"!

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Thanks Sheepshank for the great post.

I have been looking into making my own lard but keep coming across leaf lard, the fat surrounding the internal organs. In your experience do you think that making lard from fat from any part of the pig makes much difference.

Mpdkorat; as you so rightly say in the title of this thread, lard is rendered pork fat. So why don't you render your own pork fat? I've been rendering (or more correctly, my wife has been rendering) locally purchased pork fat for years. Not only do I use it, soley, when making hot water crust pastry for raised pork pies but I also use it hasip/hasip with butter when making short crust pastry for pies/pasties and savoury flans.

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Mpdkorat, glad to be of assistance. With respect to leaf lard; that sounds to me like the porcine equivilent of bovine suet (the fat which surrounds the kidneys). I would love like to get hold of some proper suet because I desparately want to make a beef steak and kidney pudding just like wot mum used to make, but that's another story.

So far as the pork fat is concerned, we only use the fat which covers the animals' muscles, usually loin, belly or leg, and I have no experience of fat covering internal organs. I hope you give my method a try. The results are worth the effort and you get the added bonus of a pile of pork scratchings to enjoy with your next can of Chang. Cheers!

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Mpdkorat, glad to be of assistance. With respect to leaf lard; that sounds to me like the porcine equivilent of bovine suet (the fat which surrounds the kidneys). I would love like to get hold of some proper suet because I desparately want to make a beef steak and kidney pudding just like wot mum used to make, but that's another story.

So far as the pork fat is concerned, we only use the fat which covers the animals' muscles, usually loin, belly or leg, and I have no experience of fat covering internal organs. I hope you give my method a try. The results are worth the effort and you get the added bonus of a pile of pork scratchings to enjoy with your next can of Chang. Cheers!

I will certainly give your method a try and thanks again for your assistance.

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Mpdkorat, glad to be of assistance. With respect to leaf lard; that sounds to me like the porcine equivilent of bovine suet (the fat which surrounds the kidneys). I would love like to get hold of some proper suet because I desparately want to make a beef steak and kidney pudding just like wot mum used to make, but that's another story.

So far as the pork fat is concerned, we only use the fat which covers the animals' muscles, usually loin, belly or leg, and I have no experience of fat covering internal organs. I hope you give my method a try. The results are worth the effort and you get the added bonus of a pile of pork scratchings to enjoy with your next can of Chang. Cheers!

Any thoughts on Beef suet.In UK can by ATORA for making dumplings,suetcrust pastry etc but dont see it here.I can do the rabbit stew but without dumplings its not the same

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Hi gennisis, if we could buy Atora Shredded Suet in the LoS all our problems would be over! But I've never seen anything resembling it here either; and I've never had the brass neck to ask family visitors to hide some in their hand baggage because it's probably banned by Thai customs (BSE, Foot and Mouth etc). I mean to say when the customs saw the PG Tips tea bags in my brother's baggage last year they thought he was smuggling hash (and I DON'T mean the kind you make with a 12oz tin of Fray Bentos corned beef!).

It's a crying shame, but there is just no substitute for beef suet if you want a light and smoothly textured pastry for dumplings, S&K pie, steamed puddings, need I go on, because butter and margerine shortening just doesn't "cut-the-mustard" IMO.

There may be a way around your problem however. If you know your local cattle slaughterer/beef butcher you may be able to persuade them to save you the two kidneys, c/w suet covering, the next time you are stocking up with fresh beef for your deep freeze. It might work, you never know, and you might find enough suet for one S&K pudding.

For my part, I own over 40 head of beef cattle; I've sold 10 for slaughter so far this year and I've never had so much as a sniff of any suet. As they say, life's a bitch and then you die.

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Hello K. Sheep -- go to a market and ask 'nam maan moo mai (?)'

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Hi jazzbo; Yes you are correct "pig oil". I see it regularly in my local market, hanging up in plastic bags at most stalls selling moo. They look like bags of p1ss and they retail at 10-20 baht per bag depending on the quantity. I was thinking about mentioning it in a previous post but as I have never used it I didn't feel qualified to comment.

Anyway, I have always preferred to take the fat from a freshly killed animal and render it down myself because you just don't know how long the stuff in the market has been hanging around for.

I've also taught myself to make pork sausages because I don't trust the quality of the produce in the local market. And before anybody asks, you can buy salted-down skins "sai moo"(?), for 250 baht per kg, if you ask nicely, at any stall which sells pork and/or sausages in your local market :o .

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