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Where Can I Buy Lard In Thailand

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I've been here 10 years in Thailand and I have it on good authority that foreigners are not allowed to own lard legally in their own name in Thailand. Many foreigners do own lard in their Thai spouse's name. Some form companies and then register the lard in their companies name although recently this has been frowned on by authorities. I suggest all foreigners seek legal counsel before buying any lard in Thailand. I hope this is helpful.

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Hi gennisis, if we could buy Atora Shredded Suet in the LoS all our problems would be over! But I've never seen anything resembling it here either; and I've never had the brass neck to ask family visitors to hide some in their hand baggage because it's probably banned by Thai customs (BSE, Foot and Mouth etc). I mean to say when the customs saw the PG Tips tea bags in my brother's baggage last year they thought he was smuggling hash (and I DON'T mean the kind you make with a 12oz tin of Fray Bentos corned beef!).

It's a crying shame, but there is just no substitute for beef suet if you want a light and smoothly textured pastry for dumplings, S&K pie, steamed puddings, need I go on, because butter and margerine shortening just doesn't "cut-the-mustard" IMO.

There may be a way around your problem however. If you know your local cattle slaughterer/beef butcher you may be able to persuade them to save you the two kidneys, c/w suet covering, the next time you are stocking up with fresh beef for your deep freeze. It might work, you never know, and you might find enough suet for one S&K pudding.

For my part, I own over 40 head of beef cattle; I've sold 10 for slaughter so far this year and I've never had so much as a sniff of any suet. As they say, life's a bitch and then you die.

I dont believe that Suet,Atora if you like comes only from the fat arround the kidneys,when I say I dont believe this its simply because there arent enough kidneys to keep Atora supplied are there???

So,I saw at Rimping last week some very fatty brisket.If rendered down I would get what I would call :dripping". Would be great for proper chips ..ala ..Harry Ramsdens.. but.what about being able to use it as Suet for pastry??? any thoughts.

Reminds me as a kid at the end of WW2 eating dripping on bread with pepper and salt....thought it was delicious in those days.

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Maybe Wikipedia could help you in your quest for more information about beef suet because I'm by no means an expert on the subject.

For my part I have, within the last 30 mins, purchased a 250gm pack of pukkha Original Atora Shredded Suet at a specialist purveyor of Fine Farang Foods (pies, sausages, black pudding, bacon etc) in Khon Kaen called Donna's Farang Foods.

I'm off to make me a steak and kidney pudding now. First one in five years. Oh joy!!!!!!!! :o

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Hi jazzbo; Yes you are correct "pig oil". I see it regularly in my local market, hanging up in plastic bags at most stalls selling moo. They look like bags of p1ss and they retail at 10-20 baht per bag depending on the quantity. I was thinking about mentioning it in a previous post but as I have never used it I didn't feel qualified to comment.

Anyway, I have always preferred to take the fat from a freshly killed animal and render it down myself because you just don't know how long the stuff in the market has been hanging around for.

I've also taught myself to make pork sausages because I don't trust the quality of the produce in the local market. And before anybody asks, you can buy salted-down skins "sai moo"(?), for 250 baht per kg, if you ask nicely, at any stall which sells pork and/or sausages in your local market :o .

Made the lard yesterday as per your instructions, worked out very well. I was assisted by the mother in law. When she saw what I was doing she said you can get that in the market for 15 baht (Pig Oil) She then took me to the market and there it was a bag of pig oil hanging there. I will try that next time. With regards to the 'Sai Moo' thats my next project making sausages.

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K. Korat -- I have making some sausage meat lately -- haven't bothered with the casings -- based on the spices available locally I make a Chorizo-style -- everything but paprika a Thai-grown product.

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K. Korat -- I have making some sausage meat lately -- haven't bothered with the casings -- based on the spices available locally I make a Chorizo-style -- everything but paprika a Thai-grown product.

JR Texas: Pig Oil.......is that the yellow-looking stuff they sell in the plastic bags? Also, I used to cook bacon back in the USA. Of course, when you cook bacon (if you are from Britain I think you call this something else) you get fat drippings. I would put those drippings (hot) in a coffee can. Then after it cooled down, I would put in in the refrigerator. Later, it would form two layers......on top was a "cap" that looked very greasy and gray. Below that was a "jelly-like" substance. Of these two, which is LARD? Thanks.

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K. Korat -- I have making some sausage meat lately -- haven't bothered with the casings -- based on the spices available locally I make a Chorizo-style -- everything but paprika a Thai-grown product.

JR Texas: Pig Oil.......is that the yellow-looking stuff they sell in the plastic bags? Also, I used to cook bacon back in the USA. Of course, when you cook bacon (if you are from Britain I think you call this something else) you get fat drippings. I would put those drippings (hot) in a coffee can. Then after it cooled down, I would put in in the refrigerator. Later, it would form two layers......on top was a "cap" that looked very greasy and gray. Below that was a "jelly-like" substance. Of these two, which is LARD? Thanks.

The lard will be the fat layer ontop of the jelly.....tasty on toast

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Hey Gennisis,

I've just seen some very fatty brisket too, at Makro in Khon Kaen this morning, when I was there to buy a leg of lamb for tonight's dinner (yum yum). And, do you know what? It looks hard enough, and I think it'll do the same job for dumplings, S&K pudding etc as Atora (which is 85% fat and 15% flour) or the fat around ox kidneys, so why don't you give it a try with brisket fat.

BTW, you don't have to render the fat down, same same lard, when you use it to make suet crust pastry. Chop up the required quantity of fat very, very finely with a sharp knife and add it to the sifted flour before mixing it up into a dough with water and rolling it out.

This'll tickle you. My wife bought a few kg of (very) freshly killed beef in our village last weekend. She came away with a couple of kidneys for a S&K pudding and, do you know what? There was no fat covering those <deleted> p1ss strainers. When I asked her why no fat? She said: "Oh, he cut fat off and threw it in bin because he think you no want". My wife has been re-briefed!

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If you are in Chiang Mai you can purchase lard in most of the Thai shops selling flour etc. for bakery's. The Wife calls it white butter and buys it in 1 kilo. packages. I would think it would be avaliable in most of the larger cities where they have bakerys which need supplies.

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K. Korat -- I have making some sausage meat lately -- haven't bothered with the casings -- based on the spices available locally I make a Chorizo-style -- everything but paprika a Thai-grown product.

JR Texas: Pig Oil.......is that the yellow-looking stuff they sell in the plastic bags? Also, I used to cook bacon back in the USA. Of course, when you cook bacon (if you are from Britain I think you call this something else) you get fat drippings. I would put those drippings (hot) in a coffee can. Then after it cooled down, I would put in in the refrigerator. Later, it would form two layers......on top was a "cap" that looked very greasy and gray. Below that was a "jelly-like" substance. Of these two, which is LARD? Thanks.

The lard will be the fat layer ontop of the jelly.....tasty on toast

JRTexas: The white stuff at the top is actually LARD? It is tasty on toast? It looks like something you use to grease the car! Oh well.........I will give it a try. Thanks for the info.

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Hi jazzbo; Yes you are correct "pig oil". I see it regularly in my local market, hanging up in plastic bags at most stalls selling moo. They look like bags of p1ss and they retail at 10-20 baht per bag depending on the quantity. I was thinking about mentioning it in a previous post but as I have never used it I didn't feel qualified to comment.

Anyway, I have always preferred to take the fat from a freshly killed animal and render it down myself because you just don't know how long the stuff in the market has been hanging around for.

I've also taught myself to make pork sausages because I don't trust the quality of the produce in the local market. And before anybody asks, you can buy salted-down skins "sai moo"(?), for 250 baht per kg, if you ask nicely, at any stall which sells pork and/or sausages in your local market :o .

Made the lard yesterday as per your instructions, worked out very well. I was assisted by the mother in law. When she saw what I was doing she said you can get that in the market for 15 baht (Pig Oil) She then took me to the market and there it was a bag of pig oil hanging there. I will try that next time. With regards to the 'Sai Moo' thats my next project making sausages.

Now made the sausages and the pork pies. Turned out quite well for a first try.

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post-17919-1182499005_thumb.jpg

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Hi,

In Bangkok, lard is readily available at Villa Markets at a price it's easy enough to render pork fat to make your own as has been mentioned. With the temperature in Thai and the humidity it becomes very soft for pastry making (other than Hot Crust ) and nixing 2 parts of rendered lard with 1 part coconut oil, available in just about any market produces a much firmer "lard" a much better product for this country.

Suet is only obtained in any quantity from around the kidney of beef or lamb, usually needs to be ordered from your beef supplier. It can be shaved or grated and used as "Atora" but you have the slight problem of the stringy membrain running through it. A better way is to render it gently, pour off, and when cold and solidified, either grate or if you have access to a mincer then mince it. it's what British housewives did before the war when most didn't go out to work. The reason that suet is used is because it melts at a higher temperature than other cookin fats, allowing steamed puddings etc. to rise to their wonderful fluffy state before the fat melts and "sets" the puddings.Hope this helps.

Regards

Mick Towers

Edited by Buckwheat
Email address removed, please see Forum Rules
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Hello Sheepshank -- Where is Donna's Farang Foods in Khon Kaen??

...and to M. Khorat I found this interesting XLS spreadsheet on sausage making spice proportions ... 'hope the attachment works.

sausage.xls

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Hello Sheepshank -- Where is Donna's Farang Foods in Khon Kaen??

...and to M. Khorat I found this interesting XLS spreadsheet on sausage making spice proportions ... 'hope the attachment works.

http://www.donnasfoods.com/

And thanks for the spread sheet

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