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PeaceBlondie

Which Dialect Of English Has The Most Idioms?

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I don't want to start a war between the Brits and the Yanks; those ended in 1814. However, here's a simple question: between the vocabularies of British and American English, which dialect has the most idiomatic terms that are not commonly used on the other side of the pond, even by well educated natives?

I was thinking about spanner, boot, windscreen, lift, lorry, amongst, whilst, shan't, and countless other Britishisms, and wondering whether we Americans have conjured up an equally long list of exclusively North American terms. By the way, I'm using the term dialect here in a semi-professional way to refer not to the differences in pronunciation (rhotic or non-rhotic) or spelling (rumour, rumor), but vocabulary that isn't common. Which dialect has more national words, spoken by educated natives, than the other? How many terms like clever and smart have distinctly different definitions?

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leave it our geezer, knock it on the barnet or you'll be brown bread

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I find in funny when a sepo (Yank) refers to something by a brand name, like how some refer to tissues as Kleenex or refer to toilet paper as charmin or cotton buds as q-tips, etc. I think it's kind of funny and it takes a while to get use to.

I guess the Dialect also depends on which part of the country you come from, so, antoher good question would be which yanks and which brits use the most idioms? And, are they worse than aussies when it comes to using idioms?

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Thanks, aussie1983. Another point is that when you start teaching EFL, you have to broaden your vocabulary. Another example is 'pisseth' which is in the King James Version for 'urinate,' and is not used by Americans to mean 'got drunk.' Do British or Australian EFL teachers already know their Americanisms? Eh, what's that aboot? Is it aboot a boot like a cowboy boot :o eh?

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geeze , ow cum ya eft t stralians out ??

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"fanny"

Now that's a word that will leave Brits bemused when used by Yanks..

totster

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geeze , ow cum ya eft t stralians out ??

The aussies speak English.. ? well I never....

totster :o

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fag - can't beat rolling one around your lips and sucking slowly on it.

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I'd have to vote for Australia as having the most "unusual" idioms. The media--especially films and television--have played a big role in spreading idioms around, thus, when I was first overseas, most British idioms I had at least heard.

Australia is a little more isolated, less populated and a lot of the actors and actresses that made it into internationally well-known films were in either British or American films and didn't bring a lot of the idioms in the international mainstream.

Then there are all those unusual creatures they refer to!

The first few times I was out with a couple of Australians, it took me some time (and questioning) as to what some of them meant. Fortunately, they are very patient people. I felt boring, since they knew all mine!

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Car "trunk" vs "boot"

Baby "Passifier" vs "dummy"

My first trip to Oz I heard someone say "He spat the dummy". Took me weeks to humble myself and ask what in the world it meant.

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I'd have to vote for Australia as having the most "unusual" idioms. The media--especially films and television--have played a big role in spreading idioms around, thus, when I was first overseas, most British idioms I had at least heard.

Australia is a little more isolated, less populated and a lot of the actors and actresses that made it into internationally well-known films were in either British or American films and didn't bring a lot of the idioms in the international mainstream.

Then there are all those unusual creatures they refer to!

The first few times I was out with a couple of Australians, it took me some time (and questioning) as to what some of them meant. Fortunately, they are very patient people. I felt boring, since they knew all mine!

Crikies mate!

One word I love to use is "slash" as in urinate.

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Everybody should watch out for Americans driving on the pavement.

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Ask your mate to jot them all down with his buckshee biro whilst you hoover the carpet in the parlour.

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I'd have to vote for Australia as having the most "unusual" idioms. The media--especially films and television--have played a big role in spreading idioms around, thus, when I was first overseas, most British idioms I had at least heard.

Australia is a little more isolated, less populated and a lot of the actors and actresses that made it into internationally well-known films were in either British or American films and didn't bring a lot of the idioms in the international mainstream.

Then there are all those unusual creatures they refer to!

The first few times I was out with a couple of Australians, it took me some time (and questioning) as to what some of them meant. Fortunately, they are very patient people. I felt boring, since they knew all mine!

Crikies mate!

One word I love to use is "slash" as in urinate.

"shake hands with the wife's best friend"

"point percy at the porcelain"

"shake the snake"

couldn't be simpler really

also love the way the poms refer to an ajustable spanner (or wrench for the septics) as a "Crescent" which is a brand name.

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