Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
PeaceBlondie

Which Dialect Of English Has The Most Idioms?

Recommended Posts

also love the way the poms refer to an ajustable spanner (or wrench for the septics) as a "Crescent" which is a brand name.

Interesting, I must come from the wrong part of the UK as I've NEVER heard an adjustable spanner referred to as a 'Crescent' :o although I have come across Crescent branded tools (part of the Cooper tools range).

Add to the mix the differing pronunciations that actually change the meaning, like 'route', 'routing' or 'router' i.e.:-

In the UK 'route' is pronounced as 'root' which has a somewhat different meaning in Oz (nothing to do with trees) :D So referring to 'rooting' with a 'Cisco rooter' can cause some, er, confusion :D

Of course we must then consider 'router' when pronounced 'rowter' in the UK is a device for cutting slots in wood.

Arrgghhh, do we share a busted language or what?

EDIT According to that repository of all knowledge (Wikipedia) a Crescent (wrench) is an American term :D

Edited by Crossy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed, chrome-plated adjustable hand wrenches are almost always called crescent by Americans, regardless of brand name. We do similar brand naming for Scotch tape, Kotex, Kleenex, velcro, and other things that are generic rather than the brand itself. We might even drop the upper case, which of course we call a capital letter. My Brit friend said the other night that due to Hollywood, the British probably are more familiar with Americanisms, than vice versa.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
also love the way the poms refer to an ajustable spanner (or wrench for the septics) as a "Crescent" which is a brand name.

Interesting, I must come from the wrong part of the UK as I've NEVER heard an adjustable spanner referred to as a 'Crescent' :D although I have come across Crescent branded tools (part of the Cooper tools range).

Add to the mix the differing pronunciations that actually change the meaning, like 'route', 'routing' or 'router' i.e.:-

In the UK 'route' is pronounced as 'root' which has a somewhat different meaning in Oz (nothing to do with trees) :D So referring to 'rooting' with a 'Cisco rooter' can cause some, er, confusion :D

Of course we must then consider 'router' when pronounced 'rowter' in the UK is a device for cutting slots in wood.

Arrgghhh, do we share a busted language or what?

EDIT According to that repository of all knowledge (Wikipedia) a Crescent (wrench) is an American term :D

all the pommy sparkies I have worked with have called them crescents, and multigrips are polygrips (they arnt made of plastic) :o:bah:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
all the pommy sparkies I have worked with have called them crescents, and multigrips are polygrips (they arnt made of plastic) :o:D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poly

I dont care what wikepeda says, the poms I have worked with have referred to a shifter as such

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To answer the OP's question whilst not wishing to add logic to the discussion...

... the older the language the more idioms, and other strange linguistic elements, would have been added. Thus, British English would, logically, contain more.

With recent(ish) global media communication trends (Films and Microsoft) the US is more clearing displaying theirs. That doesn't mean that they have more though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Friend of mine once wanted to compliment his American hostess. Told her her house was very "homely". Couldn't understand the strange look he got.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had never heard 'take the piss' until associating with British people in Thailand and after years I'm still confused. Does the protagonist take the piss out of the victim or does the victim take the piss from the protagonist? Just when I think I've got it someone uses it in the opposite context. Confused Yank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<deleted>, dogs <deleted> and donkeys <deleted>.

Do any of the non Brits know which one is the higest praise and which one is the lowest?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know <deleted> from Bohemians, but British-born actress Elizabeth Taylor liked to say "Balls!" And the American secretary of state who was born in Eastern Europe accused a diplomat at the United Nations of not having "cojones"!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This reminds me (as a brit) of when I moved to the US. I had been there (Florida) for a few months when my friend from the UK joined me and we decided to drive down to the Keys for a holiday. Tired after an 18-hour drive, I reported to the poolside bar after check-in and, along with ordering a beer, asked the astonished barman/bar-steward/bartender if he could:

"knock me up a club sandwich or something" :D

This being a perfectly acceptable turn of phrase in the mother tongue :o

Edited by captainstabbin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

captainstabbin, further south in Key West, you'd have gotten beat up by asking them to knock you up some fags....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
captainstabbin, further south in Key West, you'd have gotten beat up by asking them to knock you up some fags....

I actually was in Key West, but you see, in UK to 'knock up' can be used for the verb 'make', so unlikely with regards to fags

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just last week I was explaining to some students (mature ones of course) about smoking a fag...

One student understood very well because he was the dog's <deleted>.

Another didn't understand at all, but he is a bit of a donkey's <deleted>.

A couple of students thought that I was talking a load of <deleted>, and they were probably correct.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...