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BANGKOK 24 April 2019 01:25
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BambinA

Beware About Fake Preparation

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Attention please..

I have got a serious emergency case today. She is a Cocker Spaneail (English).

The owner dropped hers "Detick", no FDA acceptable .This chemical claimes that it uses for getting rid ticks and fleas off"

I have no idea about what is the generic name of this THING. However, I know it 's a kind of chemical that somebody makes it for dropping at the neck's back-side of the animal'( similar side as" Frontline spot on"

Jesica, a poor Cocker, was coma by "Detick" . When the owners brought her to my clinic.She was unconcious and salivaton.

Just Coma, Her heart stopped working for few mins and no breath.

I did CPR on her. And I woke her up from death. Now, she is fine.

I want you guys to aware and try not to use silly chemical agent for your animal.

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I did CPR on her. And I woke her up from death. Now, she is fine.

:o

Moss

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That's pretty serious, Bambina!

Do your customers remember where they got it from and bring you a similar product, so you can post it here?

I would like to put a warning at my kennel and inform the rescue organisations, vet's and others in Chiang Mai.

Thanks for the warning! And great job that you saved the dog's life! :o

Nienke

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sounds like possible organic phosphates poisoning ; or maybe she used too much at once??? or her dog had an allergic reaction to this particular type?? or synergistic affect with other chemicals/meds?

posted here is info i found for a friend after her dog was poisoned with O.P. (since we live in agricultural area our first thought was temec, used in the cotton fields near her moshav. it turned out it was intentional poisoning)... the dog survived due to atropine and good supportive treatment: but have seen dogs and cats overdosed on all different types of chemicals including frontline etc...

Organic Phosphate Insecticides

The organic phosphate group of insecticides includes materials such as: methyl parathion, malathion, naled (Dibrom), azinphosmethyl (Guthion), dimethoate (Cygon), diazinon, ethion, acephate (Orthene), methamidophos (Monitor), oxydemeton-methyl (Meta-Systox-R), disulfoton (Di-Syston), fonofos (Dyfonate), phorate (Thimet), phosmet (Imidan) and chlorpyrifos (Lorsban). Some of these compounds are highly toxic while others are relatively safe. All of them, however, can be used safely by following the precautions on the label. Early symptoms and signs of organic phosphate poisoning include headache, dizziness, blurred vision, weakness, chest discomfort and nervousness, a little later - nausea, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, sweating, tears, salivation, slow pulse, muscular tremors and possibly convulsions. This group of insecticides enters the body through ingestion (swallowing), inhalation (breathing), and absorption (through the skin).

Carbamate Insecticides

The carbamate insecticides include carbaryl (Sevin), propoxur (Baygon), methomyl (Lannate), carbofuran (Furadan), thiodicarb (Larvin), oxamyl (Vydate) and aldicarb (Temik). Some of these compounds are highly toxic while others are relatively safe. However, use only those recommended for the job after all of the label has been read and precautions followed. Symptoms and signs of carbamate poisoning include constriction of pupils, salivation, profuse sweating, fatigue, muscular incoordination, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and chest tightness. This group of insecticides can enter the body through ingestion (swallowing), inhalation (breathing), and absorption (through the skin).

Synthetic Pyrethroids

The synthetic pyrethroid group includes esfenvalerate (Asana), permethrin (Ambush, Pounce), cypermethrin (Ammo), zeta-cypermethrin (Mustang), and cyhalothrin (Karate, Warrior). One of the most common signs of synthetic pyrethroid poisoning is a stuffy, runny nose and scratchy throat from inhalation of partly purified pyrethrum extract. Asthmatic wheezing may occur in susceptible individuals. Sudden bronchospasm, swelling of oral and laryngeal mucous membranes, and shock (anaphylaxis) have been reported after pyrethrum inhalation. Delayed appearance of breathing difficulty, cough and fever, with patchy lung infiltrates on x-ray suggest hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Nervous irritability, tremors, and inability to coordinate muscular movements have occurred rarely in persons who have had massive inhalation exposure to pyrethrins.

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Pet shops in Bangkok sell a 'local version' of frontline that's about a third of the cost. Does this sound like the type of stuff they put on her neck?

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My customer told me that the brand was "detick"

There are 2 sizes of it; 1 cc. for 5-10 kgs dog and 2 cc. for 20kgs+.

Using "detick" by dropping at the neck similar side as Frontline.

I have no idea what is the chemical inside. However, the costomer told me that her firends' dogs were ok with this product.

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We've also bought local made stuff and used it on our dog without problems. I'm guessing there's a lot of this being used because it cheap and readily available. Is it possible the dog had an allergic reaction or something like that?

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maybe she used too much at once???

or her dog had an allergic reaction to this particular type??

or synergistic affect with other chemicals/meds?

i reiterate:

these are the three main possibilities:

or the dog has kidney or other organ problems in which case these drops shouldnt be used...

bina

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have to admit i bought and used detick many times as well, never had any problems...

just recently i got a roundmail that a dog in us died after they used frontline on it, similar symptoms... so it is all not safe in certain situations or if the dog has some unknown weakness or disease. we should not forget that any medicine has side effects, some to a very high extent and risk if the dog has already some issues!

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My customer told me that the brand was "detick"

There are 2 sizes of it; 1 cc. for 5-10 kgs dog and 2 cc. for 20kgs+.

Using "detick" by dropping at the neck similar side as Frontline.

I have no idea what is the chemical inside. However, the costomer told me that her firends' dogs were ok with this product.

Bambina, I am using Frontline (not local version). Can I assume that this is OK?

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Bambina, I am using Frontline (not local version). Can I assume that this is OK?

You are using Frontline and there is no problem with your pet(s). It is fine.

However, there is a chance for animals get allergic problem from medicines, chemical substances or food. We just do not know. Unless animals show the sign later.

For me, using garantee products is an advantage. Atleast you know what is it inside. So vets will know what is the cause of problem. Vets can give an antidote, if it has. On the other hand, when you use a "local product" mostly, they do not tell or lebel what is inside. It is hard to find the exactly way to cure.

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Bambina, I am using Frontline (not local version). Can I assume that this is OK?

You are using Frontline and there is no problem with your pet(s). It is fine.

However, there is a chance for animals get allergic problem from medicines, chemical substances or food. We just do not know. Unless animals show the sign later.

For me, using garantee products is an advantage. Atleast you know what is it inside. So vets will know what is the cause of problem. Vets can give an antidote, if it has. On the other hand, when you use a "local product" mostly, they do not tell or lebel what is inside. It is hard to find the exactly way to cure.

Bambina.......

I brought a Border Collie into Thailand in August. It has been a nightmare keeping ticks under control for the last couple of months. Border Collies are double haired with a thick matted undercoat better suited to northern Scotland than Thailand.

Initial fear was that ivermectim drugs could not be used for ticks, I have avoided using it since day one. I dont know how others have got on, but I now spray my house and yard(with a combination of chemicals to kill both adult and eggs) and surrounding area in front of my house which wonderfully includes a temple and school all within 25 metre of my front gate (the soi dog nightmare). I used frontline and ivermectim on two dogs I returned to there original owner when the border collie arrived, they were constantly tick infested no matter how hard I tried.

However, I have just changed to Preventic(after extensive internet research), I can honestly say this has been life changing, Porsche my Border Collie is tick free 99.9% of the time now (I have found one tick in one month, I check everyday, it appears this one had just found Porsche as a new home, and I think you know how active border collies can be around grassy areas) ...... I will probably change the Preventic Collar monthly as I am near the end of the second collar, the second one is proving to loose some of it's ummph after three weeks now, similar to what I experienced with the first collar.

I am posting this for dog owners that may still have problems, this may be common knowledge on the forum already, but because this has turned out to be SO good, I want to share my experience.

I would be interested to here other dog owners experence with Virbac Preventic collars. I am using an ivermectim heartworm tablet, this is very weak ivermectim and acceptable for border collies, this combination may be why it litterally rids my little fella of ticks.

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I would be interested to here other dog owners experence with Virbac Preventic collars. I am using an ivermectim heartworm tablet, this is very weak ivermectim and acceptable for border collies, this combination may be why it litterally rids my little fella of ticks.

Milbemycin Oxime (Interceptor®) is the drug of choice of collie and shetland.

Since we know that IVM has an effect on GABA receptor. Nomally, IVM is not able to prenetrate into blood brain barrier. However, some certain breeds have a problem with it.

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