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southerndog

Work Permit

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Once one gets a work permit, doesn't that put one at their employers mercy?

Do this, do that.. etc... Say no, you're fired, and have to leave the country in 7 days. I feel these really give an unfair advantage to employers in the balance (or imbalance) of power between an employee and their boss.

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Or you can not get a WP and then have to leave the country. In most countries employers have an advantage. When you are a foreign worker and not a citizen there is already an imbalance. Actually, the WP probably affords you some protection. If the employer paid for it, and it's expensive, he has a vested interest in keeping you. It does, however, make it a little difficult for you to leave.

It's an interesting question. I've actually never thought about in either a positive or negative way, just a necessary evil!

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If you have signed a contract.....you also have some legal rights, depending on the reasons as to you being fired.

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Sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. If we want protections, properly enforced contracts, and legal recognition, it's only fair that we are required to obey those provisions of our contracts which don't violate Thai labour law or else be subject to some consequences. Or, on the other hand, if you want freedom to leave anytime, the employer should have the freedom to fire you anytime. Fair's fair, either way, as far as I can see.

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As I vaguely understand visas and work permits, you have to leave the country within 7 days if you are on an extended visa. Were you lucky enough to have several months left on an unextended B visa, you might not have to leave the country.

All things considered, having a work permit is better than not having one.

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Working with a work permit affords one far more protections and benefits than working without one. Generally speaking, working legally is always better than working illegally regardless of the justifications and rationales one reads, hears or utters. :o

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Indeed, a work permit is extremely advantageous. Assuming you can get one, and you work where it says you're supposed to, don't do private lessons, and have a half decent employer.

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Once one gets a work permit, doesn't that put one at their employers mercy?

Do this, do that.. etc... Say no, you're fired, and have to leave the country in 7 days. I feel these really give an unfair advantage to employers in the balance (or imbalance) of power between an employee and their boss.

Why would you have to leave the country in 7 days!!???? If you have a valid visa you do not need a WP to stay here, just to work. I have a visa and get between 2 and 4 WP's a year (contract work) but just one visa.

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The basic non-immigrant B visa is fairly short term- until extended for the purpose of employment (after receipt of a work permit). At that point, the visa/extension become tied to that work permit. If the work permit is cancelled, you have 7 days from that point of valid visa time as a grace period either to leave or find another employer- and if you choose the latter option, everything must go very smoothly (including the release of paperwork from your previous employer) for you to avoid a visa run.

"S"

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As others have said, having a WP provides you more protections under Thai law, as obstensibly, the employer is on the radar providing you with statuatory benefits (eg Social security, tax is paid properly, visa extensions, termination pay etc etc). And while you don't strictly have to be on written contract, labour courts here, as it has been shown by some members, are especially predisposed to the employee when the employer does wrong.

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