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BANGKOK 19 July 2019 17:15
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Referring To Oneself By One's Name

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I don't know if this is a Southern thing or not, but down here most people (especially women) refer to themselves by their first names, instead of me or I. Why is this? Is this common throughout the country? What's wrong with "I"?

An example: I ask, "who's phone?" and she will say "Jun's phone".

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Common throughout the country. Not so much with men as with women -- I think it might be a little "precious" or effeminate for most men to use (Thongchai MacIntyre always refers to himself as "Bird" or "Pii Bird", though -- say no more!).

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If it is effeminate for men to use it, what should men use with Thai friends and loved ones?

I've always been referring to myself with my name.

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Women generally use their nickname, referring to themselves in the third person. Feminine pronouns (such as dichan) are rarely used except for formal speeches. Perhaps they use the words pi, nong, or nu occasionally depending on the age of the person they are addressing. This can become very confusing if you are in a conversation where you don't know people's names.

Men rarely refer to themselves in the third person.

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Oh yeah, and most girls have at least 2 nicknames so things can become even more confusing if they are talking to different people.

Even Thai people get confused by this so don't feel bad if you have know clue who did what with who and who was involved.

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I don't know if this is a Southern thing or not, but down here most people (especially women) refer to themselves by their first names, instead of me or I. Why is this? Is this common throughout the country? What's wrong with "I"?

Which 'I'?

I've been told that country women tend to use names because it avoids the issue of choosing the correct pronoun!

On the other hand, as a name rather than a pronoun should be used for a servant in a conversation between servant and master, I've been nervous of using a name for 'you'.

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I must say, it took me some time to get used to referring to myself by my name. Of course, southerners also skip this part altogether and just use no personal pronoun whatsoever in most conversations. Example: "Pai nai?" answer: "Pai talaht" or rather "Pai laht" :o

Just curious, anybody know why they do it?

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I must say, it took me some time to get used to referring to myself by my name. Of course, southerners also skip this part altogether and just use no personal pronoun whatsoever in most conversations. Example: "Pai nai?" answer: "Pai talaht" or rather "Pai laht" :o

Just curious, anybody know why they do it?

Maybe the folks down south have figured out that when two people are having a conversation that using pronouns is a but redundant. : )

In my village up north one rarely hears a proper name being used and usually one addresses oneself using a familial relationship such as "phii", "nong". or "lung." Women more often than men will use their common nicknames, or the generic "nuu". Proper pronouns such as "chan," "phom," or "khun" are used mostly in more formal settings when visiting public and private institutions such as banks, hospitals, and Amphoe offices. My favorite misappropriate Frang line in regards to pronouns is when I hear some newbie telling his even newer girlfriend "phom rak teu."

But I must admit it was a bit awkward in the begining to refer to myself in the third person in normal daily conversation

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Johpa's answered the question already - why use an extra word when it isn't strictly necessary - it is clear who is doing what.

As for speaking with servants, I am not sure what is proper as I don't have one...

Instinctively, I would guess the master adresses servants (female) by name or with "nuu" if she is younger, maybe 'paa' for an older woman.

With a male servant who is quite old, I think "lung + name" would be fine, but the most natural word to use might be the actual job they do - "khon khap rot" for a driver "ror phor phor" (short for 'raksaa khwaam plawt phai' ('watchers/caretakers of security')) for a guard, and so on.

I have been advised to avoid "yaam" referring to security guards, since the guards themselves find it sounds derogatory and disrespectful of their work).

This is based on instinct - I may be wrong.

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:o I used to call my name like a third person when i was a teenager. I just wanted do it like most of thai teen girls do but i think it was not myself. My dad & mom told me it was "fake" pls be yoorself. So i called myself as l should do. It's up to occation and person that i contact with.

When i have to give a speech, lecture or presentation in front of class and public. I use "dichan" cuz it's formal.

If i speak to my dad & mom, my older relative, my thai teachers, and someone who older than me i call myself "nuu" something called myself as a third person :D it's up to situation.

for someone who are in the same age or nearly same or little younger than me. I use "chan" or "raow" or "kha jaow" "Dian" This one just use for fun. :D

sometimes for someone who look Chinese (like me, i have 25% Chinese blood) and younger than me, i call myself "Jae", which means older sister in chinese.

Sometimes i use rude word but just for fun.

However, I don't like to call myself with my nick name. I think it's too cute and feminine

for the guys who call himself that way i think it's too sweet as a girl. :D

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