Jump to content

Help Finding 220 Ac Record Turntable In Bkk


Recommended Posts

Any help in solving this problem is much appreciated.

I've got about 100 vinyl record albums that I want to convert to mp3s and/or CDs here in BKK, now that I have the leisure time to do so, both before the records get any older and so I don't have to keep lugging the big heavy box of them around with me.

I brought my 110 AC home turntable with me from the U.S. (along with a 220 AC power transformer). But whenever I've set it up and tried recording into my computer, I get a bad audio HUM coming thru the system. (And I never had that problem before when I did the same process in the states).

So, this has me looking for a 220 AC record turntable somewhere in BKK. But every electronics store I go to, the kids look at me with blank stares when I talk about records and turntables. (I don't think they know what a record is!!!)

Thus, anyone have any suggestion on where to find a 220 AC turntable here in BKK, so I can avoid the power conversion and electric hum in the record recording process.

Thanks, John.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can find them at Ban Mor Area in Bangkoks China Town. Even Pioneer is there and I seen last time some in their window! But to first check in Old Siam Deparmentstore which is at Ban Mor!

Taxidrivers know Ban Mor very well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Try to ground the metallic parts of the turntable on the same ground line as the PC and transformer. This could help to get rid of the 'HUM' or use a line (RC) filter on the audio cable going into the PC.

opalhort

Edited by opalhort
Link to post
Share on other sites

Try reversing the power plug on the transformer.

Otherwise "The Analog Shop" in Fortune Town will likely have what you require :o

Don't forget you can't just plug your magnetic turntable cartridge into the PC, you will need a pre-amp with RIAA equalisation unless you have a software RIAA equaliser.

I've seen a USB box that does all the business, when my brain starts functioning I'll remember where :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
If you've got a 110v one, why not just get a step down transformer?

OP has hum problems using a Tx, he may also have 50/60Hz speed problems if the turntable has a synchronous motor.

Edited by Crossy
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks very much to everyone for the advice and suggestions... I'll look further into Fortune Town, and some of the other tips passed along here.

So far, using my own Technics 110 AC turntable from the U.S., hooked up to a step down transformer that lowers the 220 current here, I get good sound and pitch for the music. The main problem is indeed the hum coming from either the turntable or the electric plug-in converter box that feeds the signal at an appropriate level for line-in input.

I've heard/read a bit before about switching the orientation of the electrical plug. I'll try that next to try to knock out the hum. But all this stuff (Core Duo laptop, analog turntable, converter box, & USB soundcard (since the laptop itself only has mic and headphone jacks)) is sitting atop my little used dining table/much used desk.

If anyone can offer specific suggestions of how to go about properly grounding all this stuff, it also might also help solve the problem. Unlike my desktop, the laptop doesn't have any external metal screws appropriate for attaching grounding wires. I'm not sure what else nearby I might attach them to.

Thanks, John.

If you've got a 110v one, why not just get a step down transformer?

OP has hum problems using a Tx, he may also have 50/60Hz speed problems if the turntable has a synchronous motor.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks very much to everyone for the advice and suggestions... I'll look further into Fortune Town, and some of the other tips passed along here.

So far, using my own Technics 110 AC turntable from the U.S., hooked up to a step down transformer that lowers the 220 current here, I get good sound and pitch for the music. The main problem is indeed the hum coming from either the turntable or the electric plug-in converter box that feeds the signal at an appropriate level for line-in input.

I've heard/read a bit before about switching the orientation of the electrical plug. I'll try that next to try to knock out the hum. But all this stuff (Core Duo laptop, analog turntable, converter box, & USB soundcard (since the laptop itself only has mic and headphone jacks)) is sitting atop my little used dining table/much used desk.

If anyone can offer specific suggestions of how to go about properly grounding all this stuff, it also might also help solve the problem. Unlike my desktop, the laptop doesn't have any external metal screws appropriate for attaching grounding wires. I'm not sure what else nearby I might attach them to.

Thanks, John.

If you've got a 110v one, why not just get a step down transformer?

OP has hum problems using a Tx, he may also have 50/60Hz speed problems if the turntable has a synchronous motor.

Obviously you don't have a synchronous motor driving your turntable (unlike my old turntable, which did) otherwise you would suffer a speed difference. Although, if you're "tone deaf", you may not notice any difference.

About the 'hum'...well I'm sure the electrical "experts" will be able to "solve" that for you but I will not leave you hanging in the lurch. It's quite simple...all you need is a good "earth". This means that your whole electrical system must be earthed properly (unless you want to do a bad job). One "expert" here seems to think that all you need to do is to drill a hole in concrete, attach a wire to the hole (somehow) & you will have an earth. This is not only untrue, it's bloody dangerous. Also, "active/neutral polarity" must be observed for your situation to be resolved (not critical).

If you're using a "step down" transformer, it should have an "earth screen" (very safe), which is then connected to a "proper earth" (not connected to a metal lug that is drilled into concrete). Earth screened tranformers are used for 2 reasons;

1] Safety.

2] Electronics (reduced "noise").

Mind you, this transformer is only good at reducing noise if you have a "proper" earth to connect to.

Unfortunately, due to the wonderful American wiring system that Thailand has partially adopted, keeping correct "plug polarity" is virtually impossible due to the nature of the plugs & sockets (2 pin). I actually mark "active" & "neutral" on my "important" plugs & sockets. Again & unfortunately, it will take a reasonably knowledgeable person who knows how to use a multimeter & understands electrical systems OR an "electrician" (good luck finding a good electrician) to do this for you.

I'm sure that one of the other 2 knowledgeable people (Crossy or David96) may be able to help you with this. Do not trust any info from anybody else unless verified by Crossy or David96.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course proper grounding is the way to go, but it is also advisable to keep the transformer physically as far away as possible from the turntable and PC/Laptop (>3mtr.) and make sure no audio cables get close to the power cables.

opalhort

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are several issues with grounding audio systems which you need to consider.

  1. Watch out for magnetic coupling between your VERY sensitive cartridge and the transformer (thanks opalhort)
  2. The outer of your audio cables need to be grounded BUT only at a single point to avoid ground loops (your turntable may have a special connector for this purpose), keep the audio cables short.
  3. You do have shielded cables don't you?
  4. Have you got an RIAA equalised pre-amp, if so you should be using the AUX or LINE input to your PC (there may be a low-gain option on the mic input, look in volume control)
  5. If you don't have a properly equalised pre-amp you will find your recordings suffer from lack of bass due to the way vinyl is recorded to limit excessive stylus travel, this can be fixed in software, never tried it myself.

Edited by Crossy
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...

See a related thread that's now surfaced on this same general subject...

PS... I still have the same box of records, not yet digitized... Life threw me a few loops in the intervening months that pushed down the records project to a lesser priority...

But meanwhile, I've replaced the older PC with a new dual core HP Media Center PC.... with integrated sound... Hmmm.... next stop.... new PCI-E sound card on the next trip back State-side...

Then back to the record player dilemma... Sorry guys... I know stereo and computer stuff... But I don't have a degree in electrical engineering...

Trying to figure out the upshot of all the prior advice on eliminating the hum from my prior turntable recording set-up was like trying to ski uphill...just going nowhere!!!! :o:D:D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...