Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
george

Exit Poll Results Show PPP Wins

Recommended Posts

The problems begin.

Overthrow again will bring sanctions from the western nations.

No overthrow will mean revenge time and fighting.

Thailand did well to avoid fighting the last time but this time?

Hope all stayes peaceful.

If you like to bet on the baht, one might look for it to weaken if there is trouble.

I am old so I always look for peace and compromise.

Perhaps the two main parties will form a coalition government.

Or the EC will give long enough red cards till the result is like they want it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

National election ends Sunday

BANGKOK: -- National election ended across Thailand on Sunday at 3pm in a general election conducted after more than one year after the military ousted prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra in a bloodless coup.

Polling stations closed after seven hours of balloting, and the Election Commission said it expected to release unofficial results by midnight Sunday.

About 45.7 million Thais were eligible to vote in the first election since the coup in September 2006, and the commission said voter turnout would likely reach 70 per cent.

--TNA 2007-12-23

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am old so I always look for peace and compromise.

Perhaps the two main parties will form a coalition government.

Don't think it's gonna happen in this term! NO!

Hopefully PPP has learned their mistakes and fix it this time. Gotta say they ran the country well, economic was picking up but well .. too much power and greedy has fuc**d them up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The problems begin.

Overthrow again will bring sanctions from the western nations.

No overthrow will mean revenge time and fighting.

Thailand did well to avoid fighting the last time but this time?

Hope all stayes peaceful.

If you like to bet on the baht, one might look for it to weaken if there is trouble.

I am old so I always look for peace and compromise.

Perhaps the two main parties will form a coalition government.

This will never happen and both parties have said as such. Anyway it's an irrelevant idea as it looks as if the PPP have got the election - lock, stock and barrel. It's all over. I'm drinking heavily now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The early vote count doesnt look like an outright PPP win. Guess it can change though

Early vote count is usually the advance polls. A lot can change yet.

Here is a thought. What if they red card everyone who broke the election laws? Maybe there will be nobody left? What then?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm drinking heavily now.

Cheers. I'm with ya.

kurtgruen: What if they red card everyone who broke the election laws? Maybe there will be nobody left? What then?

We live back in Seismosaurus hallo period.

Edited by legag

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if this is the will of the people, does that mean the people just voted for another coup and continuation of military rule?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The problems begin.

Overthrow again will bring sanctions from the western nations.

No overthrow will mean revenge time and fighting.

Thailand did well to avoid fighting the last time but this time?

Hope all stayes peaceful.

If you like to bet on the baht, one might look for it to weaken if there is trouble.

I am old so I always look for peace and compromise.

Perhaps the two main parties will form a coalition government.

This will never happen and both parties have said as such. Anyway it's an irrelevant idea as it looks as if the PPP have got the election - lock, stock and barrel. It's all over. I'm drinking heavily now.

I'm drinking heavily, too, but I wouldn't say that it's all over...

There is no way that the military junta can give power back to Thaskins cronies, win or loose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The problems begin.

Overthrow again will bring sanctions from the western nations.

No overthrow will mean revenge time and fighting.

Thailand did well to avoid fighting the last time but this time?

Hope all stayes peaceful.

If you like to bet on the baht, one might look for it to weaken if there is trouble.

I am old so I always look for peace and compromise.

Perhaps the two main parties will form a coalition government.

This will never happen and both parties have said as such. Anyway it's an irrelevant idea as it looks as if the PPP have got the election - lock, stock and barrel. It's all over. I'm drinking heavily now.

starting drinking now....just don't read later posts.....I hope tomorrow when I wake up the world is OK again....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exit polls show Thaksin loyalists win Thailand's first post-coup election

© AP

2007-12-23 09:48:43 -

BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) - Former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, deposed, exiled and allegedly corrupt, was poised for a comeback-by-proxy as his allies won Sunday's post-coup election, according to exit polls.

The outcome is likely to deepen the country's two-year political crisis.

Polls from Thailand's two leading polling agencies, however, differed on whether the pro-Thaksin People's Power

Party had won an absolute majority in the 480-seat lower house of parliament.

The final results might still allow the PPP's opponents to form a coalition government.

Thaksin was ousted in a bloodless coup in September 2006 but retains widespread popularity among the rural majority. PPP campaigned on a platform of bringing Thaksin back from exile in London to continue his populist policies.

Unofficial results were expected before midnight (1700 GMT) Sunday in an election billed as a return to democracy after 15 months of military-backed government.

A Dusit poll for Bangkok's Suan Dusit Rajabhat University forecast that PPP had won a majority with 256 seats, compared to 162 for the rival Democrat Party.

An Abac poll for Assumption University showed PPP had won 202 seats, falling short of an outright majority, with the Democrats taking 146 seats.

The Dusit poll surveyed 341,000 voters nationwide before polling stations closed at 3 p.m. (0800 GMT). It had a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percentage points. Abac's sampling error was not immediately released.

Voters among the 45 million eligible cast ballots for about 5,000 candidates from 39 political parties.

The contest pitted the PPP, stacked with Thaksin supporters and adhering to his populist policies, against the Democrat Party, the country's oldest.

PPP leaders said Thaksin, who was watching the election from Hong Kong, would return to Thailand early next year, sparking fears of continued political turbulence and sharp polarization.

«The economy was prosperous when Thaksin was prime minister and I voted for the People's Power Party because the party leader promised to bring Thaksin back to the country,» said Pranee Teamsri, the owner of a tailor shop on Bangkok's outskirts after emerging from a polling station.

But a number of others in Bangkok, where the Democrat Party is strong, criticized Thaksin's regime for its corruption, saying the former leader had left Thailand in «a mess.

The Dusit poll showed the PPP swept the vital northeast, a populous region of impoverished farmers, where they won 109 of 135 seats.

The Chart Thai party, a likely ally of the Democrat Party, emerged third with 29 seats, according to the Dusit poll.

The top rivals for next prime minister are a study in stark contrasts.

People's Power Party head Samak Sundaravej, 72, is an acid-tongued, ultra-rightist dubbed a political dinosaur by the local press. He has been charged with involvement in corrupt deals while serving as Bangkok's mayor. But he is seen as Thaksin's proxy and his earthy style appeals to many.

The 43-year-old Abhisit Vejjajiva, who leads the Democrats, is regarded as an intelligent, honest politician but lacking the common touch needed to connect with the mass electorate. English-born and educated at Eton and Oxford, critics say he is more comfortable in elite circles than wooing the key rural voters.

«I voted for the Democrats with the hope that Mr. Abhisit, who is an honest man with a clean record, will be able to restore the slumping economy,» said Narese Marsuk, a bank employee.

«The policy of the People's Power Party is the same as Thaksin's party so that is why many people like me voted for the PPP,» said Samran Kalaween, a Bangkok suburban housewife.

Chalerm Yoobamrung, a parliamentary candidate of the People's Power Party, said at a final campaign rally that Thaksin would come home from his self-imposed exile in London on Valentine's Day, Feb. 14.

But speaking after casting his vote, Samak said only that some time after the election would be needed before Thaksin returns, adding the former prime minister would have to face the criminal charges against him and stay out of politics.

Thaksin faces a slew of corruption charges but remains popular among the rural masses and lower income urban residents to whom he offered cheap loans, virtually free medical care and village based development schemes.

Abhisit said Saturday he would allow Thaksin to return «to face charges here so justice will prevail.

Outgoing Prime Minister Surayud Chulanont, who was installed by the military after the coup, said he hoped for «a peaceful transfer to democracy,» describing himself as a «referee» during a difficult transition period.

The prospect of Thaksin's return has raised fears of another coup by the powerful military.

Last week, the military-installed parliament approved a controversial internal security law that critics warned will allow the military to maintain a grip on power even after the election.

The new law will allow the Internal Security Operations Command, a key security watchdog, to order curfews, restrict freedom of movement and curb the powers of government officials in situations deemed harmful to national security.

The election comes after almost two years of intense political instability that began with popular demonstrations demanding that Thaksin step down because of alleged corruption and abuse of power. The protest culminated in the coup.

Thaksin, whose Thai Rak Thai Party took power in 2001, was returned to government in 2005 by a landslide victory that gave it an unprecedented absolute parliamentary majority.

After the coup, Thaksin, a 58-year-old billionaire, was barred from office for five years and charged with a barrage of corruption-related crimes. He lives in self-imposed exile in England, where he owns the Manchester City soccer club.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...