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Thaksin Launches A Second War On Drugs


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How can he get away with saying things like this and still be in office?

And do you remember him recently bristling with indignation at a report criticising Thailand's records on human rights ? I think he said something like 'they should discuss these issues with the government, not spoil the country's reputation' !!

It's his pathetic despotism that really drives me wild.

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Okay, are you happy to be the first innocent to die in this second war on drugs? You can be a real hero. We'll make posters of you and put them up all over the country. 'He died an innocent man, but he sure died for the greater good'.

Another confused soul.

(yawn) If I associated with known drug dealers, yes, I'd have to be able to accept that fate. As for any 'innocents' within a family of drug dealers? ... no such thing. The family is typically a cohesive unit here and if that kid wasn't a dealer at age 9, he surely would have been by age 18. Just like in any business here: from wholesale rice, gold, to construction materials trading, the whole family gets involved.

:D:o

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Hurrah! So it's time to see more news headlines about 8 yos caught in the line of fire of police bullets (but not killed by police 'cause there's no ballistic database and no proof!!!)? Yeah, this sure is a cause for celebration!

Heng, are you sure you haven't joined the Pudgi "there are no innocents, it's their own fault they're gunned down if they get in the way of the police on the street" brigade?

"Steven"

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Thailand: Anti-Drug Campaign Reaches New Low

NEW YORK: -- Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra's announcement of a brutal new phase in Thailand's "war on drugs" raises fears of widespread human rights abuses, Human Rights Watch said today. In an open letter to the committee that recently gave an "International Forgiveness Award" to the prime minister for his government's treatment of drug users, Human Rights Watch and more than 50 other organizations called on the committee to strip Thaksin of the award. On Sunday, Thaksin announced a new round of the anti-drug campaign that began in February 2003. Promising "brutal measures" against drug traffickers, Thaksin said, "Drug dealers and traffickers are heartless and wicked. All of them must be sent to meet the guardian of ######, so that there will not be any drugs in the country."

Thaksin's remarks suggest a revival of last year's deadly drug crackdown. Between February and May 2003, some 2,275 suspected drug offenders were shot dead in Thailand in apparent extrajudicial executions. The United Nations special rapporteur on extrajudicial executions, Asma Jahangir, expressed "deep concern at reports of more than 100 deaths in Thailand in connection with a crackdown on the drug trade." During the first phases of the drug crackdown, the country's homicide rate more than doubled.

"These latest developments mark a new low in Thai drug policy," said Brad Adams, executive director of the Human Rights Watch's Asia Division. "Thaksin's approach to drug addiction merits disgust and condemnation, not forgiveness."

The use of spine-chilling rhetoric to promote violence against drug suspects has been a hallmark of Thaksin's drug policy. In January 2003, Thaksin stated, "Because drug traders are ruthless to our children, so being ruthless back to them is not a bad thing." Wan Muhamad Nor Matha, the interior minister at the time, said of drug traffickers, "They will be put behind bars or even vanish without a trace. Who cares? They are destroying our country." In August 2003, Thaksin ordered a "shoot to kill" policy against people suspected of smuggling methamphetamines into Thailand from neighboring Burma.

Last month, the Italian Istituzione Perdonanza Celestiniana granted their annual "International Forgiveness Award" to Thaksin in recognition of his government's treatment of drug users as "patients, not criminals." The award marked a public relations boon for Thaksin, who has attempted to soften his image by referring to drug users (as opposed to drug traffickers) as "patients" in need of rehabilitation. In 2003, Thailand passed a law defining drug users as "patients" and providing rehabilitation to low-level drug offenders. Thaksin pledged to provide free treatment to 300,000 drug users while disrupting drug trafficking though tough law enforcement measures.

But the facts tell a different story. Throughout the drug war, drug users have reported beatings, arbitrary arrest and prolonged detention at the hands of Royal Thai Police. Some have been forced to sign false confessions stating that they had trafficked methamphetamine tablets. Others have escaped into hiding, or they have dropped out of drug treatment programs in order to avoid arrest or murder. Health experts fear a spike in HIV transmission as a result of injection drug users going underground and sharing blood-contaminated syringes.

--HRW News New York 2004-10-05

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"These latest developments mark a new low in Thai drug policy," said Brad Adams, executive director of the Human Rights Watch's Asia Division. "Thaksin's approach to drug addiction merits disgust and condemnation, not forgiveness."

what has it got to do with human rights watch.

this is a thai problem for the thais to solve in their own way.

if drug dealers dont want to get shot then they should stop selling drugs.

thailand will be better off without them.

most thais applaud thaksins stance and methods re. drug dealers.

its a pity that western governments find it so difficult to fight fire with fire and spend so much time listening to the human rights apologists that most decent people live in fear of crime.

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taxexile, so you are quite happy with the idea of street executions of maybe drug dealers, so where do we draw the line? street executions of ppl riding motorbikes without crash helmets?at what stage of law enforcement should the thai police not be allowed to be judge jury and executioner?

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yes it is common knowledge that drug dealers are forcing the drugs onto the consumers. with such a bright future ahead for most thais it is beyond me why they would turn to drugs for solace.

maybe they should just be informed they can buy better quality , cheaper amphetimines and anti-depressants from the local pharmacy.

:o

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its a pity that western governments find it so difficult to fight fire with fire and spend so much time listening to the human rights apologists that most decent people live in fear of crime.

Maybe it's out of fear that underground drug labs and small private dirt airstrips might really be defended by weapons of mass destruction? Much easier to go pick a fight with a bunch of conventionally armed Middle Easterners.

:o

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taxexile, so you are quite happy with the idea of street executions of maybe drug dealers

well , although i'm not exactly cheering in the street at the news i am certainly not losing any sleep over it.

over 90% of recidivist crime is drug related , as those who become addicted to their drugs commit crime after crime to get the finance for their next purchase.

get rid of the drug dealers , offer rehab for those who want it , and i believe that crime levels will drop enormously and the quality life for the average person will improve.

drug dealers laugh at human rights legislation as all it does is to increase their chances of success.

so, ready ....aim....fire.!!!!!!!! :o

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Why not legalise all drugs? In the end we all started the same with mother's milk and later on somewhere down the road a minority of people became drug addicts for whatever reason.

I don't think by legalising drugs suddenly the whole planet will get stoned or coke-crazed same as not everybody becomes a smoker or alcoholic.

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Why not legalize drugs? Because we already see what happens to people when users have nearly unlimited access to super cheap drugs. Legalization will make it a lot LESS profitable for the narcotics producers and sellers, but as long as there is a single Baht of profit to be had, they'll still pump out their products by the ton.

:o

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Okay, are you happy to be the first innocent to die in this second war on drugs? You can be a real hero. We'll make posters of you and put them up all over the country. 'He died an innocent man, but he sure died for the greater good'.

Another confused soul.

(yawn) If I associated with known drug dealers, yes, I'd have to be able to accept that fate. As for any 'innocents' within a family of drug dealers? ... no such thing. The family is typically a cohesive unit here and if that kid wasn't a dealer at age 9, he surely would have been by age 18. Just like in any business here: from wholesale rice, gold, to construction materials trading, the whole family gets involved.

:D:o

good logic. Let's just take the kids from anyone that is in prison now, line them up and behead them.... and don't forget any women that are involved in the drug world in any way.... if any of them are pregnant, we could publically abort their fetuses with a coat-hanger. I like your solution, eliminate any and all future potential drug world workers before they have a chance to soil this clean world of ours.

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Why not legalise all drugs? In the end we all started the same with mother's milk and later on somewhere down the road a minority of people became drug addicts for whatever reason.

I don't think by legalising drugs suddenly the whole planet will get stoned or coke-crazed same as not everybody becomes a smoker or alcoholic.

This has been suggested before in the US and other countries. The problem is that too many people have a vested interest in continuing the status quo. Literally billions of dollars are used to fight 'the war on drugs' every year. The only permanent solution is for the gov't to take over the supply of drugs and sell them for cost. You have to take the profit motive out of drugs; the producing, transporting, distributing and selling of them in order to change the present situation. I do not think we are going to see any country legalize drugs anytime soon. :o

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