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BANGKOK 21 April 2019 19:12
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Eastender

Simple Thai Expressions

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bannork,

I appreciate what you're saying. During some of my time in Thailand I was swapping English for Thai lessons, and got a lot out of it. Though once I could get most things I needed, and make very simple pleasant conversation I got a bit lazy.

I also got used to using B. P. Becker's format of reading/writing Thai in English script. But I keep hearing from people, and from her books too, that learning Thai script is the only way to progress and I guess I should start properly. Sadly I'm stuck in the UK for a while now but I have some books.

Anyway, keep your phrases coming.

More examples like scouser's are useful where one can learn a structure and then swap words to adjust. What I'm hoping for here are more everyday natural expressions that aren't necessarily found in my text books when learning Thai.

Thanks all.

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OK, so this idea wasn't so popular! I'll add some myself;

Rep reep (hurry up) mid tone

Reep reep noi - same - to be more polite

Buat ching chong (going/desperate for a pee) mid tone - I think

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Buat ching chong (going/desperate for a pee) mid tone - I think

I don't hear that but usually esp kids, "bpuat chee", not to be confused with "buat chee", meaning to ordain as a nun, I think :o

Bpuat kee, or bpuat thai kee - dying for a crap :D

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OK, so this idea wasn't so popular! I'll add some myself;

Rep reep (hurry up) mid tone

Reep reep noi - same - to be more polite

Buat ching chong (going/desperate for a pee) mid tone - I think

'Ching chong' for pee is a word Thais seem to like to teach farang, but why, heaven knows...

It works, but it is more natural and neutral to say 'bpuat chee'.

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OK, so this idea wasn't so popular!  I'll add some myself;

Rep reep (hurry up) mid tone

Reep reep noi - same - to be more polite

Buat ching chong (going/desperate for a pee)  mid tone - I think

Eastender

This idea is very good I think. May be someone wants to learn these

simple thai expressions sometime,so he or she can come in here and

take a look.

:o

Always use "krub" (for men) and "ka" (for women) when you

want to be polite. Add these words to the end of all the examples below.

ขอบคุณ "khorb khun" means Thank you

ไม่เป็นไร "mai ben rai" means it's ok For example when someone

tries to give you something but you don't want it or someone says

thanks to you, you say mai ben rai.

BYE

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Thai is phonetic, with a few exceptions, so once you know the rules you should be able to pronounce clearly, in theory!

While I agree that one should learn to pronounce clearly spelt words, I think it can be helpful to show the pronunciation. Apart from anything else, it helps learners check that they can read. Also, there are words like ตำรวด [M]tam[L]ruat where the tone rule is complicated, not to mention riddled with exceptions.

If you learn Thai using English letters there's various obstacles: firstly, many sounds in Thai have no equivalent in English so various writers use different combinations of  English letters in a futile attempt to replicate the Thai sound, utter confusion
The trick here is for us to use a consistent set, ideally based on the International Phonetic Alphabet. Sabaijai made the very good suggestion of starting from the official transliteration into English (Royal Thai General System of Transcription). This is worth understanding anyway, as it will frequently be encountered, though often with unofficial enhancements. For consonants, the only problem is that initial จ is transliterated <ch>, which is ambiguous - he suggested we should use <j>. Given that usage, we can tolerate <g> for ก as well as the official <k>.

For vowels, he recommended fixing the defects in the official scheme:

(1) It doesn't show length - partial solution is to double the single written vowels to show length, and also in the diphthongs in -i and -o (as written).

(2) It doesn't distinguish the vowels of มอง 'look' and โมง 'hour'. We agreed that the latter should be <moong>.

We didn't settle on what to do about มอง - the options <morng> and <mawng> were left open. The Nation uses <or> in the names of government forms. I believe we can all view (and most of us type) Latin-1 characters, so we could even go Scandinavian and try <måång>. Plain <maong> can't be used because the official transliteration uses <ao> for words like เข้า <khao> 'enter'.

I haven't addressed all length contrasts - I will addres the others with tone.

Secondly the tones, intrinsic to every Thai word, you are going to have to have  2 arrows, one going up and one down, 3 horizontal lines, one in the air, one 1 centimetre above the line on the page and one line on the line of the page to represent the 5 tones, the words will start to look like geometric expressions.

The solution is simply to use letters, as can be done in the ASCIIfication of the IPA. The preferred method for delimiting tones seemed to be in square brackets at the start of the syllable. (My preference is simply to use the capitals after the syllable, but tough.) Meadish Sweetball has been using accents, but most fonts don't support the caron he would require for a rising tone.

Finally, and this I think was my suggestion, where a digraph could represent a short vowel or a long vowel, we can copy Thai and use an 'S' like the tone marker to indicate the short vowel, thus [RS]khaeng for แข็ง 'hard'.

The biggest disadvantage of showing the pronunciation is that it can easily show up a poster's ignorance!

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The biggest disadvantage of showing the pronunciation is that it can easily show up a poster's ignorance!

Thats why I never try to put any in!! :o

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" Hello, nice to meet you again."

ยินดีที่ได้พบคุณอีกครั้ง - yin dee tee dai pop khun eek krang

ดีใจที่ได้พบคุณอีกครั้ง - dee jai tee dai pop khun eek krang

Scouse.

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Big Spuds - no I didn't, sorry, maybe I have an old email address on my personal info thing. Should be robininbkk@hotmail.com (although sadly I'm in the UK and not BKK).

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The trick here is for us to use a consistent set, ideally based on the International Phonetic Alphabet.  Sabaijai made the very good suggestion of starting from the official transliteration into English (Royal Thai General System of Transcription).

Your link says "It is used in highway signs ...". I live in Phuket where there is one road "Sai Yuan" that is also spelt "Sai Yaun" and - even worse - "Sai Yorn". I keep thinking of getting a thick, black felt tip pen and making corrections. :o

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Big Spuds - no I didn't, sorry, maybe I have an old email address on my personal info thing.  Should be robininbkk@hotmail.com (although sadly I'm in the UK and not BKK).

Unfortunately, misspellings are rather common, and the Thais themselves rarely catch these, since naturally they concentrate on reading the Thai version instead of the inexact English transliteration.

A consistent system is still a good suggestion... :D

At the moment, I am using something close to the Haas/AUA versions (both based on the International Phonetic Alphabet) but without the proper accents and sometimes without proper indication of vowel length.

I just noticed that the new version of the forum supports using Firefox! Yay and hooray. :o

And I managed to quote the wrong post too... well well.

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" Hello, nice to meet you again."

ยินดีที่ได้พบคุณอีกครั้ง - yin dee tee dai pop khun eek krang

ดีใจที่ได้พบคุณอีกครั้ง - dee jai tee dai pop khun eek krang

Scouse.

Thanks for that Scouser, I'll practice for when I return in November. What is the difference between the two phrases? Is one formal and one informal? Which one would be best to use for a group of people I am likely to meet at the airport?

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