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BANGKOK 21 April 2019 20:03
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fruity

100 Rai Wanted In Korat, Buriram Or Surin

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As always be patient. You will get a good buy if you wait, Most local farmers aint wallowong in cash because of the hike in global food prices. If u offer 20-30k per rai for 100 rai rice paddy, somebody in the region u pick will sell up at some point needing the cash. I hope myself to pick up 100 rais in the next 2 years in Sangka. Upto 3 million max? No probs!

Edited by lukey1979

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in our village near nong kung sri kalasin, we purchased extra farm land we pay 20,000 baht per rai and very good sugar land and close to a tar sealed road.we rent farm land generally a 8 to 10 rai plot we rent for 40,000baht which is a returnable down payment when the owner requires the land back with usually a minimun 2 year period,we have one we have just rented 8 rai for 55,000 bahtwhich has small sugar on which we can sell this year a pretty good deal.

just to let you know what others in other regions pay!

by the way to rent the 8 rai at 55,000 baht i had to bring in aussie dollars which was a 21baht at the time,which hurt but was still a good rent as the guy does not want back for 6 years.

Edited by nev

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Hi,

I know of 82 rai of land for sale in surin province. Main road with electricity. A quick sale. Aprrox 65k a rai.

Send m a personal message for more info.

Cheers,

GFL.

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Chatting to a Buriram small rice farmer mid January 09, who I think had no axes to grind as I am not buying and the conversation was very casual, she said she would buy rice paddy at 35,000 a rai in her area (sorry can't be more specific on precise Burilam location / access etc as the conversation was actually in a beer bar in Pattaya!).

She agreed with my conjecture that prices were on the way back down from the stupidities of the last few years (worldwide), so my view would be that you should buy now only if you have to for emotional, not financial reasons.

I offer this up as just another piece of anecdotal evidence on land prices. Similar stuff on another thread gave me the evidence I needed to resist emotional strings being pulled on me by TG's family to buy some (admittedly well positioned and clearly fertile) land in the Ubon area for 65,000 a rai in the Ubon area. So thanks to Forum contributors and keep up the good work.

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price doesn't exceed 40,000 baht per rai

No help on finding rais to buy. However, me and my wife are constantly approached by people wanting to sell.

The price, is from my experience a bit expensive. We bought some land 6 months ago and paid 20.000/rai. It included a house on the property that was included in the price. We are buying everything we can in the her town since it is only located 25min outside of Khorat. The standing price is 15.000/rai for buildable property. If we get 15.000 we buy, no matter how small or big. We never go above 20.000.

For non-buildable property we would pay around 7-10.000/rai.

I did notice however, that only 10min away (in the direction towards Khorat). One rai (no buildings) was out for sale for the net amount of 200.000/rai. Ridiculus. The worst part was that it's a frang-sale. Guess he got screwed big time and is trying to make up for lost money.

---

A bit off-topic. We have offered ALL our neighbourus to buy their land. We then give back free-contracts for rent to them. The goal is to hinder them from taking a loan on the land, and end up loosing it all. We also negotiate with the people (private) that gave out the loan, and buy it cheap from them.

It's a good investment and I believe it helps a lot of them stay out of trouble. They no longer own the land, but they have the option of buying it back if they want to sell.

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I live 1 hour from Korat off of route 24 and Chanote land fetches 400,000 Baht a Rai. Sor Por Kor 100,000 Baht, even higher if adjacent to the main road that runs through the village. That's not farang prices but Thai.

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A bit off-topic. We have offered ALL our neighbourus to buy their land. We then give back free-contracts for rent to them. The goal is to hinder them from taking a loan on the land, and end up loosing it all. We also negotiate with the people (private) that gave out the loan, and buy it cheap from them.

It's a good investment and I believe it helps a lot of them stay out of trouble. They no longer own the land, but they have the option of buying it back if they want to sell.

I'm not quite understanding some of the steps in what you said.

1. "We then give back free-contracts for rent to them." So you buy property and then let them stay on the land rent free? - Whats the benefit to you?

2. "We also negotiate with the people (private) that gave out the loan, and buy it cheap from them" - How do you effect a transfer at the land registry?

3. "They no longer own the land, but they have the option of buying it back if they want to sell." - I just can't understand what you mean by this. So you buy the land and if they want to sell it to someone else they buy it back from you first???

Would be grateful if you can fill in the blanks. I see problems happening around this time next year with the bank loans when the 12months are up and income is limited to pay back. The loan sharks will have a roaring trade if they have the capital behind them - loan sharking isn't my cup of tea, but I'm comfortable in buying from a motivated seller. Im holding out hope in buying a block in the moobaan nextdoor to the lot I bought last year. The people who own it want to give it to the daughter to build a house when she gets married - I'll wait to see how it plays out. Would be great to get it, but not a big deal if I don't.

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Interesting how different the prices are.

We are located a bit north-east of route 24/chok chai, towards the airport. The prices have more or less doubled in the last 5 years, but we still buy land cheaper than the "official price". Highly motivated sellers I'd say.

1. "We then give back free-contracts for rent to them." So you buy property and then let them stay on the land rent free? - Whats the benefit to you?

buy the land and if they want to sell it to someone else they buy it back from you first???

No real "monetary" benefit at all. Rather a cost right now.

2. "We also negotiate with the people (private) that gave out the loan, and buy it cheap from them" - How do you effect a transfer at the land registry?

The loan-givers are more interested in getting perhaps 50-70% of their money now, instead of going through the costly administration of taking over the land. Thailand is no different from eg. Sweden or the US. They get much more loan than the property is actually worth. We regularly pay a bit of an overprise for the land, but can get it out of the hands of the "sharks". A "shark" in this case, can very well be Bangkok Bank. What we do, is simply talk sense with the loan-givers, it most of the time it works out very well.

3. "They no longer own the land, but they have the option of buying it back if they want to sell." - I just can't understand what you mean by this. So you

We are not doing this in order for us to get rich on their expense. I've done my fair share of UN service both in Africa and Afghanistan. But helping this way is far more effecient.

In the end, it's just as EGO as most aid. It makes you feel good, and it teaches all involved parties some fairly un-expensive lesson. Most of all my wife and her family. In a sense, the learn the lesson of Buddha in a non-thai self-centered way.

But if you want to know about the business of it all. We do take interest on a potential sell. But so far, none has wanted to sell. They are all saving the land for their children. And we are helping them save it.

Consider it a form of forced custody of the land that have been running in their family for many many years.

And then, imagine how close to a thai you have to get, in order for them to accept this rather un-conventional aid. It requires of them to loose their face. That's not something they want to do on a regular basis, is it :-) And they rather have us buy the land, than loosing it to "anyone".

Both me and my wife are both under 40, and have a steady income from our jobs. We do earn enough to leave life easy. We have no interest in getting rich on poor (and perhaps a bit under-educated) people.

But it's not a lesson in democracy or doing "good". The whole concept is easily turned into pure evil. It the basic form of power-play. You get the power to force people to do what you yourself consider to be the "proper thing to do". There is nothing in this that says that me or my wife always does the "proper thing". But we do try very hard.

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Interesting how different the prices are.

We are located a bit north-east of route 24/chok chai, towards the airport. The prices have more or less doubled in the last 5 years, but we still buy land cheaper than the "official price". Highly motivated sellers I'd say.

1. "We then give back free-contracts for rent to them." So you buy property and then let them stay on the land rent free? - Whats the benefit to you?

buy the land and if they want to sell it to someone else they buy it back from you first???

No real "monetary" benefit at all. Rather a cost right now.

2. "We also negotiate with the people (private) that gave out the loan, and buy it cheap from them" - How do you effect a transfer at the land registry?

The loan-givers are more interested in getting perhaps 50-70% of their money now, instead of going through the costly administration of taking over the land. Thailand is no different from eg. Sweden or the US. They get much more loan than the property is actually worth. We regularly pay a bit of an overprise for the land, but can get it out of the hands of the "sharks". A "shark" in this case, can very well be Bangkok Bank. What we do, is simply talk sense with the loan-givers, it most of the time it works out very well.

3. "They no longer own the land, but they have the option of buying it back if they want to sell." - I just can't understand what you mean by this. So you

We are not doing this in order for us to get rich on their expense. I've done my fair share of UN service both in Africa and Afghanistan. But helping this way is far more effecient.

In the end, it's just as EGO as most aid. It makes you feel good, and it teaches all involved parties some fairly un-expensive lesson. Most of all my wife and her family. In a sense, the learn the lesson of Buddha in a non-thai self-centered way.

But if you want to know about the business of it all. We do take interest on a potential sell. But so far, none has wanted to sell. They are all saving the land for their children. And we are helping them save it.

Consider it a form of forced custody of the land that have been running in their family for many many years.

And then, imagine how close to a thai you have to get, in order for them to accept this rather un-conventional aid. It requires of them to loose their face. That's not something they want to do on a regular basis, is it :-) And they rather have us buy the land, than loosing it to "anyone".

Both me and my wife are both under 40, and have a steady income from our jobs. We do earn enough to leave life easy. We have no interest in getting rich on poor (and perhaps a bit under-educated) people.

But it's not a lesson in democracy or doing "good". The whole concept is easily turned into pure evil. It the basic form of power-play. You get the power to force people to do what you yourself consider to be the "proper thing to do". There is nothing in this that says that me or my wife always does the "proper thing". But we do try very hard.

After reading your latest post I'm even more curious about what you meant in your first post with"it's a good investment".I thought good investments are profitable.

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A "shark" in this case, can very well be Bangkok Bank. What we do, is simply talk sense with the loan-givers, it most of the time it works out very well.

Thanks for your reply.

I disagree with the above statement - a loan shark can take on a number of different interpretations but they all result in interest rates that are well beyond market rates. A bank enforcing a breach of a loan agreement is not the same and has full rights in doing so. The only qualification I would add is that sometimes you get individuals in banks who can be unreasonable and that’s usually from inexperience in dealing with the situation of loan defaulters. At the end of the day, you can only talk reason if you have options for repayments. If you can introduce "options" into the deal, then you are helping out both parties and why new dialogue can occur. What most people don't realise is that some/most financial institutions borrow money at a lower rate and they have to abide by the loan conditions in relation to default percentages etc. That is why sometimes you can be more lenient at times and then you have to crack down at other times on the continuous defaulters.

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After reading your latest post I'm even more curious about what you meant in your first post with"it's a good investment".I thought good investments are profitable.

Some of the land we simply buy for "ourselves". So far we have not sold anything but since the prices are so much higher now, we already know that it's a good deal. However, if you knew what the plan was for that land, you'd be surprised how bad "business" we are actually planning on doing.

It is actually possible to invest in people too :-)

My wife used to be a pattaya hooker like so many others. The first time we bought land, we hindered her own cousin from going down the same road. She has now graduated from school and is working in a bank. That's what I would call a "good investment".

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It is actually possible to invest in people too :-)

I kinda figured that was what you were referring to in your previous post. Not criticising you, just trying to work out how you make it work - maybe something we could do if we understood it, in helping out others without kissing goodbye our $

Cheers

Edited by Isee

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My wife used to be a pattaya hooker like so many others. The first time we bought land, we hindered her own cousin from going down the same road. She has now graduated from school and is working in a bank. That's what I would call a "good investment".

Good on yer Gurun

I respect your honesty

Chock dee

Dave

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I have a few plots for sale. But selling land has become a major headache, with buyers puilling out at the last moment when all the ducks are in a a row. arrrghhhhh

If you PM with specifics ( area, utilities etc, near main roads) I can take a look through the portfollio and get back to you.

Thanks.

J.

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Sorry for hijacking the tread with this totaly off-topic .. topic..

It is actually possible to invest in people too :-)

I kinda figured that was what you were referring to in your previous post. Not criticising you, just trying to work out how you make it work - maybe something we could do if we understood it, in helping out others without kissing goodbye our $

Cheers

Yep, and I didn't take your question as criticism either. And I understand that I need to explain it in order for people to understand.

I think a very important thing to remember is that it IS business as usual, even though a lot of focus is on the human-part. Instead of trying to maximize the profit, you should focus on maximizing the potential in the people involved. I think anyone can do this, but if you do, it has to come from deep within yourself. It does help, as in most aid-situations, if you have a lot of empathy, but a complete lack of sympathy. Otherwise you'll just turn cynical down the road. I've seen far to many aid-workers that turned extremely cynical, and it hurt both them and the people they set out to help. You'll have to accept failure as an acceptable outcome.

Since I have a background in both military operations overseas AND civilian business overseas I think I have a good foundation for knowing what I'm doing. Some basic observations made both in Africa and Afghanistan has been the basis for this work. A quite long time ago the brittish forces (through SAS) invented the "hearts and minds" concept in order to win wars, not easilly winnable by force. Force is a factor, since there is no viable way to win the hearts of the people unless you provide them with a sense of power, and security. If you combine that with a failing IT-business (I'm a system architect by profession) and the observation that the only good, substainable business you can really do, is business build on common-sense and fair trade. .. well, if you combine it, you can create a win-win situation out of almost nothing. But, just like Microsoft, it has to start small, but preferable with a big vision. That vision should IMHO be based on "spreading the welth", in the true sense of such statements.

As a programmer I often end up in discussions about "how to be a perfect programmer". The closest we have ever came to an answer to that question is: "If you want to be a perfect programmer. Just be a perfect person, and program naturally." Obvisosly that won't happen, and I've never met a perfect programmer either. But it's as simple as that. Try to be good. Do good. And people around you will do too.

So what we infact is doing, is business in relationships. I've only (my entire career) worked for high-profile, high-tech startups. I've always been techical lead. One thing I've learned is that IF you do a good work. Try to be ahead of all the others, people will come to you when they have ideas. There is nothing that can worth as much money as if you become the natural research-partner to companies like IBM, Ericsson, Microsoft, etc. And this can be done on a small scale just as well.

If you become the person that people turn to with ideas, you have the potential to help both them and youselft to very good business. This is no mystery. But in order for that to happen, you have to earn their trust and respect. Sometimes you have to protect them from themselves too. I have other sunshine stories to tell about people we help with their lease of land and taking care of startup costs in order for them to be able to grow sweet-potatos too. In sweden it is refered to as "business-angels". People with _not so much money_ but a great willingess to risk it all for someone else. It is a kind of loan, but with no security. That part is also regular business in the end, but much higher risk. But the it's still about the idea to invest in peoples potential.

Even though I've been to places like Afghanistan, I strongly feel that there is no country more corrupt than Thailand. And I hate it. But I've learned that the only way of fighting corrution is by starting from the roots. And start small. There simply is no other way. And this is our (me and my wife) way of doing just that.

Hope that answers most of your questions, because I'm about to leave for Thailand and will be out of contact for some time now :-)

Land of Potential, here we come :-)

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