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technocracy

Local Wood Varieties . .

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Probably half the lumber sold is sold as teak. It's NOT teak and the people who buy it sell the finished product as teak. How do you tell the difference? I have no idea.

There is an old house built on stilts near us. The owner wanted to sell it so I went and had a close look. Maybe one out of ten floor joists is full of termites and the rest are not affected. The wood looks identical. Obviously I wasn't able to check the weight but as far as appearance, it looks like the same wood.

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Do you know if the following grows or is available in Thailand: Dalbergia latifolia, commonly known as Indian rosewood and shisham. I like the grain and color and am looking to furnish a home in TL with this.

Thanks for any info.

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Probably half the lumber sold is sold as teak. It's NOT teak and the people who buy it sell the finished product as teak. How do you tell the difference? I have no idea.

you smell the difference.

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Do you know if the following grows or is available in Thailand: Dalbergia latifolia, commonly known as Indian rosewood and shisham. I like the grain and color and am looking to furnish a home in TL with this.

Thanks for any info.

It's not a local rosewood variety so I'd hazard a guess that it wouldn't be available. The two which are local in Thailand and Laos are the Dalbergia Cochinchinensis and the Dalbergia Cultrata.

:o

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Probably half the lumber sold is sold as teak. It's NOT teak and the people who buy it sell the finished product as teak. How do you tell the difference? I have no idea.

you smell the difference.

Well smell is just one thing but unless you are working it the scent isn't so distinstive. . however teak is pretty easy to identify due to it's oily texture. Also it has very wide and distinctive grain - the grain is dark brown in colour and the heart wood is a very pale brown (cream colour).

Easy reference in rough sawn and most common:

Mai Doo - Mid-Orange with a broad distinctive grain

Mai Daeng - Dark Red with a tight fine grain (very heavy)

Mai Khaen - varies from dark orange-brown to grey depending on state of wetness also a fine grain

Mai Nhang - In general pale yellow - cheap!

Also teak with be more expensive than any other!

Forgot to say if it's termite infested I'd say it's cheap crappy mai nhang.

Edited by technocracy
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Well if people are interested I can provide pictures of mai doo, mai khaen huu, mai khaen hin and mai daeng in raw and finished states.

I also am trying to source mai doo fai for my mai daeng guitar fingerboard - visiting my friendly timber shop tomorrow. :o

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Righty an update and a quick correction to the initial post.

mai doo fai is actually Red Sandalwood - it is mainly white with reddy orange grain and is also called mai doo luat.

mai doo lai is a dark version of it.

I went in the search of Siam Rosewood - Mai Kha Noung . . . and lets put it this way you can't get it. Mind you I don't think it help that I was dressed for work in a shirt and trousers a falang speaking Lao turning up and asking for a relatively rare wood - the shops took one look at me and just said 'nope . . ' I think they thought I was from a NGO or the like check for shops selling rare woods!

One shop who didn't just tell me to either go away or just give me a hard faced 'no have' (seriously asking for this wood gave me the most unfriendly responses I've ever recieved from Lao people!) thought he actually had some and took into his back store room for a good hunt around. He had a large block what look very much like a rose wood or maybe ebony but he chip at it with a knife and declared it was 'mai kham phii' . Which upto this point I'd never heard of and cannot find any information on what this wood could possibly be - it's air dried outside was basically black but when he chip a small piece the inside was dark red.

One shop who initially turned me away came running after me when I got in the car and asked me what I wanted it for and how much of it I wanted. I think they might of clocked that my car has a yellow private registration plate and not a white NGO plate. They took my telephone number and said they'd call me! It was like I was trying to score dope or something . . well actually harder!

Now one thing I forgot ask about is 'mai ching chang' which is Dalbergia oliveri - another rosewood . . well burmese rosewood is the trade name. Now I have seen the name around but I am not sure if 'chingchang' is the trade name or the Lao name - I guess if I get blank looks I'll know which, my wife has never heard of it but she'd never heard of mai kha noung either.

So the search for timbers continues!

I'll provide the pics as previously mentioned sooner or later!

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Righty an update and a quick correction to the initial post.

mai doo fai is actually Red Sandalwood - it is mainly white with reddy orange grain and is also called mai doo luat.

mai doo lai is a dark version of it.

I went in the search of Siam Rosewood - Mai Kha Noung . . . and lets put it this way you can't get it. Mind you I don't think it help that I was dressed for work in a shirt and trousers a falang speaking Lao turning up and asking for a relatively rare wood - the shops took one look at me and just said 'nope . . ' I think they thought I was from a NGO or the like check for shops selling rare woods!

One shop who didn't just tell me to either go away or just give me a hard faced 'no have' (seriously asking for this wood gave me the most unfriendly responses I've ever recieved from Lao people!) thought he actually had some and took into his back store room for a good hunt around. He had a large block what look very much like a rose wood or maybe ebony but he chip at it with a knife and declared it was 'mai kham phii' . Which upto this point I'd never heard of and cannot find any information on what this wood could possibly be - it's air dried outside was basically black but when he chip a small piece the inside was dark red.

One shop who initially turned me away came running after me when I got in the car and asked me what I wanted it for and how much of it I wanted. I think they might of clocked that my car has a yellow private registration plate and not a white NGO plate. They took my telephone number and said they'd call me! It was like I was trying to score dope or something . . well actually harder!

Now one thing I forgot ask about is 'mai ching chang' which is Dalbergia oliveri - another rosewood . . well burmese rosewood is the trade name. Now I have seen the name around but I am not sure if 'chingchang' is the trade name or the Lao name - I guess if I get blank looks I'll know which, my wife has never heard of it but she'd never heard of mai kha noung either.

So the search for timbers continues!

I'll provide the pics as previously mentioned sooner or later!

A very nice thread Techno and I commend you on being able to find the Latin names for these local woods. It's not easy.

Regarding:

Tree Latin Name: Hopea Odorata

Local Lao/Thai name: Some people will call it mai khaen and others mai khaen hua

Trade name: Ceylon/Malabar Ironwood

The Thai name for this wood is "Mai Takhien" and it is commonly used for boat building. Beware there is a spirit that lives in this tree and therefore my wife will not allow me to buy or bring any of it home!

Ching Chan is also a common name in Thai. The wood is beautiful and I've seen furniture for sale made from it. It is the most expensive wood I've come across in Thailand. Used boards >1.5" thickness were selling for B45K per yoke last time I looked.

A couple of other nice Thai woods, not sure of the Latin names, that are termite resistant and with nice grains are Mai Paiyun commonly used for hammer handles around here and Mai Makaa used for tables. The latter being incredibly hard on planer blades!!

I suspect the teak looking wood that GaryA referred to is probably Mai Tabak. It has similar grain to teak but lacks the oils and depth to the grain. I'm in the process of using this wood for a deck. I left some boards on the ground for about 6 months and the termites went after the softwood although the heartwood was fine. Up off the ground it is dong fine with no further damage.

The Thai name for the Mai Doo is Mai Pradoo and is very common for furniture construction.

Some prices for used wood at our local dealer last time I looked per yoke were:

Teak siding ~5/8" thick: B8K

Teak ~1.5" thick: B25K

Mai Tabak ~1" thick: B12K

Mai Makaa ~1" thick: B18K

Mai Ching Chang ~1.5" thick: B45K

Mai Pradoo ~1" thick: B22K

There's a Lao wholesaler I found dealing in local hardwoods that may be of help to you. They can be found at http://www.houseimprovement.info/materialsforsale.asp

rgds

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Does anyone know what mahogany is called in Thai local name?

Cheers,

Soundman. :o

PS. Great informative thread!

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Does anyone know what mahogany is called in Thai local name?

Cheers,

Soundman. :o

PS. Great informative thread!

Thai name: MaHokKaneeBaiYai

Family: Meliacae

Species: Swietenia macrophylla King

From the website http://www.arboretum.ait.ac.th/searchall.cfm#

It was interesting to note that the Neem tree, Sa Dao, is also part of the Mahogany family. I'll have to plane a branch down to see what the grain looks like.

rgds

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Does anyone know what mahogany is called in Thai local name?

Cheers,

Soundman. :D

PS. Great informative thread!

Well Lao they call it mai ma hog an nii .. .. :o but I've never seen any for sale.

Cheers for the info Somtham! :( Mai Ma kha (:D) called mai te kha in Lao - Afzelia Xylocarpa, it's next on my list for a guitar body. Very beautiful timber - if you can find the burl even more so!

Talking of being hard on blades try mai daeng it's is literally like working granite. The guitar body I just finish blunted 2 router bits (one spiral bit now has a chipped blade ... most unhappy!) and to get it finished ready for a polish it took several sander belts and 15 hand sheet of cutting paper! But I've got say it looks great and will more so after a polish. Another little snip on Mai daeng I found this website

Don't know what Mai Paiyun is in Lao and never heard of it so can't tell you anything about that.

I have just discovered also that Ebony is Mai Maak Gua in Lao (Mai ma glua in Thai) - so tomorrow I will be trying to find Ebony and Chin Chang for my fret boards.

Yes Mai Pradoo is the thai of Mai doo . . which does end up being turned into the ostentatious and highly ugly side boards and units! They really don't appreciate what timber they've got - I've yet to see any piece of furniture that has been finished to the mirror finish that is possible. It really is beautiful timber . . . the neck for the mai daeng guitar is mai doo and today I started the making a mai doo guitar body. I can't wait finish them and show my wife how good mai doo can look!

As for those prices . .. . :D:D all I can say is timber in Laos is a fraction of them prices!

Edit: Oh forgot say I ain't forgot the photos just been a bit busy - I've currently got mai doo, mai khaen, khaen hin and mai daeng lying around. Hopefully I'll add Chin chang and ebony to that tomorrow. So it'll be a bit of a pictorial for the words. :D

Edited by technocracy

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Cheers for the info Somtham! :D Mai Ma kha (:D) called mai te kha in Lao - Afzelia Xylocarpa, it's next on my list for a guitar body. Very beautiful timber - if you can find the burl even more so!

Talking of being hard on blades try mai daeng it's is literally like working granite. The guitar body I just finish blunted 2 router bits (one spiral bit now has a chipped blade ... most unhappy!) and to get it finished ready for a polish it took several sander belts and 15 hand sheet of cutting paper! But I've got say it looks great and will more so after a polish. Another little snip on Mai daeng I found this website

Don't know what Mai Paiyun is in Lao and never heard of it so can't tell you anything about that.

I have just discovered also that Ebony is Mai Maak Gua in Lao (Mai ma glua in Thai) - so tomorrow I will be trying to find Ebony and Chin Chang for my fret boards.

Yes Mai Pradoo is the thai of Mai doo . . which does end up being turned into the ostentatious and highly ugly side boards and units! They really don't appreciate what timber they've got - I've yet to see any piece of furniture that has been finished to the mirror finish that is possible. It really is beautiful timber . . . the neck for the mai daeng guitar is mai doo and today I started the making a mai doo guitar body. I can't wait finish them and show my wife how good mai doo can look!

As for those prices . .. . :o:D all I can say is timber in Laos is a fraction of them prices!

Edit: Oh forgot say I ain't forgot the photos just been a bit busy - I've currently got mai doo, mai khaen, khaen hin and mai daeng lying around. Hopefully I'll add Chin chang and ebony to that tomorrow. So it'll be a bit of a pictorial for the words. :D

I've planed quite a bit a mai daeng but I think the makaa is tougher on the tools. In either case it really helps to have carbide blades. Hope you post some pics of your guitar when it's completed. I had a wood working instructor once tell me "when you think you've finished sanding....start"! Your effort on sanding will show in the final piece. What are you using for a final finish, lacquer?

The Latin name for mai paiyun is Dalbergia cochinchinensis and the common name is Thai or Siam Rosewood. You might want to check it out as I think it would make a nice looking guitar body.

Found this website today while looking for the paiyun Latin name. It has pictures of just about every wood you can think of. What I do is use the "find on this page" function and type in Thailand and hit next. You can then view a picture of the wood.

http://www.rarewoodsandveneers.com/pages/w...ecimenslist.htm

Thanks for the Thai name of ebony. You wouldn't believe the google time I've spent trying to find it about a yera ago. Appreciate it.

Post pictures of the guitars!!

rgds

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