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malcolminthemiddle

Stop Smoking, Helping Each Other to Quit

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Please sign me up, I'm 24 years old, around 40 cigarettes/day now, smoking since I was 15, need to stop it

Alex,

You have already taken the first step to quitting by declaring you want to quit.

The second step is to understand why you smoke.

So why do you? Post your answer here.

You will find the answer here www.whyquit.com

What a load of BS!

Malcolm if anyone get's clear of tobacco it will be in spite of idiotic bullshit you are popping off.

Here are the facts jack:

1. Tobacco is the most addictive substance known to mankind.(your search for reasons to smoke should end here)

2. To become a non-smoker you have to desire being a "non-smoker" very strongly.(very strongly is an understatement BTW)

3. To successfully quit you need to add something positive to your life rather than self defeating introspection.

If a person want's to stop smoking it should be because they are tired of looking like a looser imbecile blowing smoke out of his/her head. End of story.

Now get over it! :D:D:o:D

Wow... Completely uncalled for Kasi.

For your step #3 - that's also "a load of BS!". Speak to any (professional) psychologist; you can't replace an addiction with something else. Reason being, if that new "something else" lets you down, you risk going back to your addiction twice as hard as you did originally.

Last night was the worst by far for me - Thought it was going well to begin with! Still made it through smoke free, but only just.

Will update the blog later.

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Please sign me up, I'm 24 years old, around 40 cigarettes/day now, smoking since I was 15, need to stop it

Alex,

You have already taken the first step to quitting by declaring you want to quit.

The second step is to understand why you smoke.

So why do you? Post your answer here.

You will find the answer here www.whyquit.com

What a load of BS!

Malcolm if anyone get's clear of tobacco it will be in spite of idiotic bullshit you are popping off.

Here are the facts jack:

1. Tobacco is the most addictive substance known to mankind.(your search for reasons to smoke should end here)

2. To become a non-smoker you have to desire being a "non-smoker" very strongly.(very strongly is an understatement BTW)

3. To successfully quit you need to add something positive to your life rather than self defeating introspection.

If a person want's to stop smoking it should be because they are tired of looking like a looser imbecile blowing smoke out of his/her head. End of story.

Now get over it! :D:D:o:D

Well, Kasi thank you for answering Alex's question for him.

It is surprising how many smokers do not understand their addiction, hence the self education approach.

By the way, when has a question ever been BS?

Edited by malcolminthemiddle

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Well maybe I had too much coffee this morning and bit your head off without due cause. So sorry mr malcom! :o

But the main point of mine is understanding the fundamental nature of the addictive quality of tobacco. I think it is key in arresting the tobacco addiction.

I smoked cigarettes for nearly 20 years. I've been off now for about 15 years. It took 5 years for the cravings to disappear. There were times it was minute by minute resistance to picking up that first cigarette.

I stuck with the KISS technique. i.e. the only cigarette I wasn't smoking was the first one.

That and the acknowledgment that tobacco is something I can't presume to have power over.

Who am I to master the most addictive substance known?

Once a person gets some distance from their addiction the perspective of how stupid an addiction it truly is slowly creeps in to your psychology. It takes years sometimes for that to hit.

Anyway hang tough those of you who are just starting abstinence from tobacco. It does get a little easier a few years down the road.

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Well maybe I had too much coffee this morning and bit your head off without due cause. So sorry mr malcom! :o

But the main point of mine is understanding the fundamental nature of the addictive quality of tobacco. I think it is key in arresting the tobacco addiction.

I smoked cigarettes for nearly 20 years. I've been off now for about 15 years. It took 5 years for the cravings to disappear. There were times it was minute by minute resistance to picking up that first cigarette.

I stuck with the KISS technique. i.e. the only cigarette I wasn't smoking was the first one.

That and the acknowledgment that tobacco is something I can't presume to have power over.

Who am I to master the most addictive substance known?

Once a person gets some distance from their addiction the perspective of how stupid an addiction it truly is slowly creeps in to your psychology. It takes years sometimes for that to hit.

Anyway hang tough those of you who are just starting abstinence from tobacco. It does get a little easier a few years down the road.

Insight - What do you think? Shall we forgive him, he did apologise.

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Wow... Completely uncalled for Kasi.

For your step #3 - that's also "a load of BS!". Speak to any (professional) psychologist; you can't replace an addiction with something else. Reason being, if that new "something else" lets you down, you risk going back to your addiction twice as hard as you did originally.

Last night was the worst by far for me - Thought it was going well to begin with! Still made it through smoke free, but only just.

Will update the blog later.

This is what Insight thinks! He thinks some psychiatrist psycho-babble will somehow miraculously save him from tobacco.

News flash Sigmund! Sigmung himself died from jaw cancer. He was unable to stop using tobacco!

If you think a "professional psychologist" will help think again.

Tobacco is bigger and tougher than any of those mental-masterbators care to realize. :o

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Wow... Completely uncalled for Kasi.

For your step #3 - that's also "a load of BS!". Speak to any (professional) psychologist; you can't replace an addiction with something else. Reason being, if that new "something else" lets you down, you risk going back to your addiction twice as hard as you did originally.

Last night was the worst by far for me - Thought it was going well to begin with! Still made it through smoke free, but only just.

Will update the blog later.

This is what Insight thinks! He thinks some psychiatrist psycho-babble will somehow miraculously save him from tobacco.

News flash Sigmund! Sigmung himself died from jaw cancer. He was unable to stop using tobacco!

If you think a "professional psychologist" will help think again.

Tobacco is bigger and tougher than any of those mental-masterbators care to realize. :o

Hey Kasi,

Whats with all the aggression?

This forum is for people to help each other.

Doesn't matter what Insight or any one else believes if it helps them to quit whether you and/or I agree with them or not.

Your contributions are welcome, but keep them polite and respect other peoples opinion, that goes for all of us.

If you can't then please take the attitude somewhere else.

Chill out man, you sound as if you are in the first days of withdrawal and having a bad time with it.

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malcolm: I'm afraid I like to call a spade a spade when I see one.

Tobacco takes no prisoners, just slaves and then kills them slowly.

If you use tobacco sooner rather than later you will become addicted. The addiction is hardcore insidious. No way around it. Since this is a "stop smoking forum" I'd think you might appreciate the truth not some namby-pamby psycho-babble.

Quitting cigarettes is one tough mother. So you either suck it up and get other it or you don't.

I've got plenty of experience on this subject so I thought I'd share some of it. My delivery is intentionally abrasive. It is a nasty habit on so many levels.

If you think sugar coating it will help so be it.

I think the sooner a person faces the insidious facts the better.

I guess you should rename your forum section if you really insist on trying to have a "sugar coated

why can't we be nice arena".

Another thing most people who like me where serious cigarette addicts spent years trying to quit.

I won't say I know it all but I've been through much of it personally. So put that in your hat.

Personally I think it helps for a person to be fed up and not just a little ticked off. Being a slave to anything is ugly.

Anyway I'll make this my last post in your sub-forum.

If you want me back you can PM me and ask me nicely to return.

Good luck....(you're going to need it)

Edited by kasi

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Insight - What do you think? Shall we forgive him, he did apologise.

Wow... Completely uncalled for Kasi.

For your step #3 - that's also "a load of BS!". Speak to any (professional) psychologist; you can't replace an addiction with something else. Reason being, if that new "something else" lets you down, you risk going back to your addiction twice as hard as you did originally.

Last night was the worst by far for me - Thought it was going well to begin with! Still made it through smoke free, but only just.

Will update the blog later.

This is what Insight thinks! He thinks some psychiatrist psycho-babble will somehow miraculously save him from tobacco.

News flash Sigmund! Sigmung himself died from jaw cancer. He was unable to stop using tobacco!

If you think a "professional psychologist" will help think again.

Tobacco is bigger and tougher than any of those mental-masterbators care to realize. :o

:D:D

But the "psychiatrist psycho-babble" is absolutely true - you'll have a much better chance of success if you don't substitue your addiction, rather drop it all together.

But <deleted> do I care? :D I still can't quite believe it, but I made an entire evening out last night (7pm-3am) without a cig, yet surrounded by smokers at all times. Happy days....

.

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whoa - who yanked kasi's chain then... and i thought this was supposed to be a forum for helping others not putting people off cos its soooo hard... :o

keep up the good work everyone whos quit or trying to quit...

Edited by rio666uk

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malcolm: I'm afraid I like to call a spade a spade when I see one.

Tobacco takes no prisoners, just slaves and then kills them slowly.

If you use tobacco sooner rather than later you will become addicted. The addiction is hardcore insidious. No way around it. Since this is a "stop smoking forum" I'd think you might appreciate the truth not some namby-pamby psycho-babble.

Quitting cigarettes is one tough mother. So you either suck it up and get other it or you don't.

I've got plenty of experience on this subject so I thought I'd share some of it. My delivery is intentionally abrasive. It is a nasty habit on so many levels.

If you think sugar coating it will help so be it.

I think the sooner a person faces the insidious facts the better.

I guess you should rename your forum section if you really insist on trying to have a "sugar coated

why can't we be nice arena".

Another thing most people who like me where serious cigarette addicts spent years trying to quit.

I won't say I know it all but I've been through much of it personally. So put that in your hat.

Personally I think it helps for a person to be fed up and not just a little ticked off. Being a slave to anything is ugly.

Anyway I'll make this my last post in your sub-forum.

If you want me back you can PM me and ask me nicely to return.

Good luck....(you're going to need it)

In general terms smokers know the risks, most are also aware that there is no secret recipe to quitting.

For these reasons preaching the obvious tends to be counter productive.

Since only the smoker can quit for themselves; a far more proactive course of action is to educate the smoker to stop by understanding their addiction.

There is no “sugar coating” of these life and death issues within this forum.

Suggest you take the time to read back through some of the 350+ posts before jumping in with both big feet.

Yes, getting people to quit is a hard job, all help appreciated?

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I got this information in an email and thought it may provide additional help on progressive

reduction to eventually stopping.

QUOTE...........................................................................

.......................................

Researchers find easier way to quit smoking

For those still struggling with their New Year's resolution to quit

smoking, researchers have come up with a way to make it easier.

A study from Auckland University has found that smokers trying to kick

the habit might stand a better chance of staying smoke-free if they

begin using replacement nicotine patches or gum in the weeks before

they quit cigarettes.

Principal investigator Dr Chris Bullen said the conventional wisdom was

that people trying to quit throw away their cigarettes and immediately

replace them with a nicotine substitute, such as nicotine patches or

chewing gum.

But there were several theories as to why early use of nicotine

replacements might assist in breaking the cigarette habit, Dr Bullen

said.

"Nicotine is a highly addictive substance. It has been proposed that

the stress a person undergoes when giving up cigarettes, coupled with the

burden of remembering to use alternative methods of nicotine delivery,

is too much too soon.

"If a person first becomes used to the patch or gum, it might make the

transition to being smoke free easier because a crucial part of their

behaviour has already changed."

Another theory was that the combination of cigarettes with an

additional

source of nicotine "saturates" the brain nicotine receptors.

"Individuals might lose some of their desire for cigarettes before

trying to completely give them up."

New Zealand 15 March 2006

http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3604816a11,00.html

http://www.ash.org.uk/html/cessationdetail.php#reduction

I hope it may be of use to some of you and isn,t duplicated information :o

I also hope you find continued inspiration in your quest to stop and feel it,s benefits getting stronger, from each other.

Being there for each other during the times of distress and having understanding is very important.

marshbags :D:D:D

Edited by marshbags

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Not too long ago, I past my one year anniversary for quitting smoking. I just want to thank malcom for providing the web information that got me through some of the early days. Although I didn't strictly speaking follow the advice provided (I quit using nocotine lozenges as opposed to cold-turkey), I did find the information very useful for those moments of weakness.

For those still trying all I can say is keep educating yourself.

Thanks once again.

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Is Zyban available in pharmacies here ? Does it require a doctor's prescription as it does in Canada for example ?

What about the patches and nicorette gum ?

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I'm on day 26 since I quit.

For starters, make a list of reasons why you NEED to quit.

#1 on my list was health. I then listed the problems I was having (persistent coughing, shortness of breath, higher risk of cancer and heart attacks).

#2 was Hygiene (for lack of a better word). Under that I noted better smelling clothes/hair/breathe/home when you don't smoke. A reminder to myself of what other smokers smell like (which you don't notice as much while you are smoking, but it is really obvious when you quit, even for a short period.)

#3 was saving money. Figure out what you are spending every week on cigarettes and set that money aside in a secure location. After 1 year, use that money to treat yourself to something nice (depending on where you are and how much you smoke, that could equal a nice vacation to Thailand even !)

Keep the list where you normally put your cigarettes, so that every time you go for a smoke, you see the list and are reminded again why you NEED to quit.

Once I started on the "Quomem", I also started keeping track of my daily usage. I kept a small notepad on top of my cigarettes. Every time I had a smoke, I wrote down the time. When I went to have another cigarette, I would look at how long it had been since my previous one, then try to hold out an extra minute or two before lighting up.

(for example, I had a smoke at 2:12 pm. I had another at 2:29 pm, 17 minutes later. Before lighting up again, I would force myself to wait for at least 18 minutes, maybe 19 or 20 even. At the end of the day, I would total up the number of smokes I had that day. I would then look to see how many fewer smokes I had that day compared to the day before. It's surprising how quickly it adds up !)

The first day I did that (which was also the 1st day on the Quomem), I reduced the number of cigarettes I was smoking by almost 1/3 !

I was down to 18 per day on Day 6 of the Quomem (from 50/day to 18/day in 6 days !!). Your supposed to quit cold-turkey on Day 8/9 or 10. As I had smoked the last of my cigarettes, I decided to quit on Day 7, rather than buy more cigarettes. I had a supply of Mentos candy handy, which I would use every time I found myself reaching for a smoke.

Day 7 was tough. I finally broke down at 1 pm and bought a single cigarette from the local shop. Started coughing soon as I took a drag. Another reminder of why I NEEDED to quit.

I broke down again and had 1 more cigarette that evening. From 50/day to 2/day in 7 days. Not bad.

Day 8 was a little rough, but not as bad as the previous day. I decided if I could get by the previous day on two cigarettes, I could go that whole day without any at all, and I did !

Day 9 was a breeze by comparison. Hardly any cravings at all. It's been pretty smooth sailing ever since then actually.

As I mentioned, it is now Day 26. I'm almost finished my Quomem (though I have been forgetting to take them on some days, and only taking 1 per day on others).

Once in awhile I find myself wanting a cigarette, much the same as you might really want a nice cold beer on a hot day. It's not a craving though. I don't have the physiological need for nicotine anymore.

I've been out drinking in smoky bars quite a few times since I quit. Never get the urge to "have just one for old times sake". In fact, I look at other people smoking and it helps to remind me of why I NEEDED to quit. Seeing those other people smoking, coughing, knowing they have bad breath, smelly clothes and live in a smelly home/room, reminds me of why I am better off for quitting.

(I'm pretty sure my female friends appreciate it as well) :o

So, in summary.

You need to figure out why you NEED to quit. Make a list and keep it in front of you where you can see it all the time.

Plan your "quit" (get the Zyban/Quomem, notepad, gum/candy, ect. Pick a significant date if possible. Start the Zyban 8 days or so in advance of that significant date.)

Start trying to "wean" yourself (cut down) during those first few days on the medication. One thing this does is show you that you are making positive progress, by reducing the amount you are smoking each day.

The night before your "significant" date that you are going to quit on. After having your last cigarette for the day, throw out whatever smokes you have left (flush them so you won't be tempted to dig them out of the garbage tomorrow). Throw out your ashtrays (or clean them good and pack them away). Try to air out your home during the night (lots of open windows if possible. Air Fresheners if not) to get rid of the "stale smoke" smell.

Get a good nights sleep. Sleep extra if possible (notice how those cravings don't seem to affect you as much, if at all, while you are sleeping ?). Wow, how many hours has it been since your last smoke already ? THat wasn't so hard now was it ?

When you get up, look at your list of reasons why you quit. Every time you feel the cravings, have a candy/gum and look at those reasons why you quit. Remember the worst parts about being a smoker (the coughing fits, the stink, the costs, the stigma, ect).

When it gets bad, Jump up and do something ! Brush your teeth. Go for a short, fast walk. Have a shower. Take out the garbage.

Fight the urge ! Remind yourself over and over again about why you are doing this. The good news is, the cravings will go away fairly quickly. 2 days in my case. After that it gets really easy.

The biggest part is you making the decision that you NEED to quit. Then sticking to that decision. You can do it, if you want to. Remind yourself again and again about why you NEED to quit. Look at other smokers and pick out the bad things you notice. Remind yourself that others see you the same way when you smoke.

Try to avoid places where there is a lot of smoking, and limit contact with people that smoke where possible, especially when drinking. Avoid temptation.

That's about it. Now go out and get started. Quomem is available at some pharmacies without prescription apparently. It seems the price for a 1 month supply is around 2,500 baht. My local doc got me a deal through the pharmacy she deals with (1,770 baht). You may want to get a 2 month supply (if I recall correctly, the recommended program calls for a 60 day period on the medication).

Lots of people on this site are willing to give advice and encouragement. Many have been where you are now. Many have quit recently (like me). You can do it. Believe me, you can do it !

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Female...30 on Wednesday....born with a cigarette in my mouth.....gave up for 2months last year.....LOVE smoking :o:D ....partner HATES it..... tried gum earlier this year but just got belly aches which made me smoke more!! Any help for me???? :D

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