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Maizefarmer

Protecting The Roof Over Your Head From A Devious Partner

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If you want prevention in life, don't do anything, you will never have to regret anything too.

My 2 cents/satang.

Hey at least I was trying to help - It calls BRAINSTROMING….duh

How bout you, what’s your plan…….instead of..... don’t like that…don’t like this!! :o

Btw - like your old avatar better….....coz too many garfields laying around already

Edited by teacup

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Carib, of course they are farang! They can own the house (as a farang), or the lease can be in their name. I think that under Thai law, a house or land lease 'dies' when the lessee dies.. If the husband in Thailand is killed, the house is still owned/leased by the farang brother etc. That's the whole point of this idea...

Simon

Ok Simon, got it, but i was talking about `land`. We passed each other somewhere, no problem.

Regards

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But surely this whole thread is flawed? If you know that your partner is devious, then you don't marry him/her:) And if you cannot see this side of their character, then taking these sorts of precautions probably don't even cross your mind.

Simon

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Perhaps an interesting solution (if you have trusted family living overseas), is to ensure that your assets in Thailand are actually legally owned by your brother, or mother (or whoever), who happens to reside in Oz or the UK or wherever. You can have some form of legal contract with them that is drawn up in your home country that gives you control over these assets. Bring your mother/brother over for a holiday when they need to sign any initial purchase papers. Then make sure your Thai partner knows that your mother owns all your assets. She/he will have to travel to Oz/UK to commit the murder . . . .

If she asks why all your assets are held by your mother/brother, just tell her that in your country, you look after your family before your spouse - just like they do in Thailand.

Simon

Sorry simon, but if you are a farang, your mother/brother/whoever will probably be farang too.

And they are not allowed to own land, that is what it is all about.

farang can own land. several farang have acquired thai nationality and therefore can own land ie: Bill Heinecke

non-thai nationals (aka aliens) can not own land.

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I love living in the boonies of Issan. BUT, no way would I consider staying here if not for my Thai wife. She is the reason that I am happy and content here. Why would I go to the trouble and expense of having all sorts of contracts made to protect my investments? I will never be able to own any property in my name so why bother? If there comes a day when she no longer wants to live with me or if I no longer want to live with her, I will pack my personal things in MY truck and head back to MY condo. YES, I know you have all heard it before but the golden rule is to NOT spend more than you can afford to walk away from. The house, land and car are all in her name while I keep a vehicle and the condo in my name. Certainly there would be a lot of hurt and financial loss involved but I wouldn't miss any meals.

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Most lawyers conveniently 'forget' to mention that a lease or usufruct with your spouse is worthless. The spouse can revoke that right.

incorrect information! the spouse canNOT revoke a right that is entered in the chanote.

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If you want prevention in life, don't do anything, you will never have to regret anything too.

My 2 cents/satang.

Hey at least I was trying to help - It calls BRAINSTROMING….duh

How bout you, what's your plan…….instead of..... don't like that…don't like this!! :o

Btw - like your old avatar better….....coz too many garfields laying around already

Of course it is brainstorming, and in that way I answered, no other motive, absolutely not.

You gave some `safety rules` and I thought them to be not really realistic given the time frame and other stuff, that is all.

Maybe also it the style I use, English is not my mothers tongue so conversation is easier than writing it down.

Mmmm I am like; I don't like that or this and my avatar is wrong too ?? :D I really spoiled it..

I think Garfield is to stay for the time being, until i see another avatar I like. Or maybe I will go back to the old one...have to brainstorm first. :D

My plan is to go on living as I have done so far, that includes trusting people and therefor sometimes get hurt, or whatever.

Also I agree with Simon 43

Quote/ But surely this whole thread is flawed? If you know that your partner is devious, then you don't marry him/her:) And if you cannot see this side of their character, then taking these sorts of precautions probably don't even cross your mind. Unquote.

Regards

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Well done M.F for starting this very important thread, along with generating of sensible debate on the subject matter / content.

Could this OP after any additional fine tuning, be worth pinning somewhere for the benefit of those about to enter joint property ownership i wonder ?

Respectfully

marshbags :o

Edited by marshbags

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If anyone is concerned about signing their land-lease, house-lease, car-lease etc in their own name, I would be happy to have my name on these contracts. just don't tell your partner where I live :o

Simon

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I wonder if back home everyone sits around trying to figure out how to keep all their assets protected from their wives. Even to the point of discussing how to protect their assets in the case that their wife murders them.

I doubt it.

So what's up with you?

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I wonder if back home everyone sits around trying to figure out how to keep all their assets protected from their wives. Even to the point of discussing how to protect their assets in the case that their wife murders them.

I doubt it.

So what's up with you?

It's called a prenuptial agreement in the west. That said, if I had any thought of my partner killing me here in Thailand for my assets it would be time for an upgrade. Girl shopping can be fun and enlightening. Not much different from the scene in Los Angeles.

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Legal matters aside, IMO on the practical side: beneficiaries who are not Thai will rarely want to have anything to do with the country after a sudden passing/murder of one of their family members here. If you look at it from their point of view, just think of how long it took you to adjust to how sort out your business here -it takes months at best, and some cases people are still trying to figure it out 5-10+ years later- and then imagine them going through it after your death within a limited time frame.

:o

You're right Heng. But I think Maize was suggesting this as a means to hopefully avoid an unexpected and potential demise. Another way of looking at it is to protect your interests in the event of a split in the relationship. That's my take on it.

Another thought is what if your spouse or partner dies from an accident or illness and the family starts squabbling over selling off the assets? If you have no protection, you could not only be out on the street, but out your investment too.

Of course, I understand the idea was deterrence. My point was that if it gets to the point where the local wife or husband is not on your team, I'm sure they would understand the implications of your family (or your "team") being located on the other side of the ocean. It doesn't take much imagination to visualize two steps ahead in that if one decided to knock off one's partner, the victim's family would likely show up for the criminal trial but probably wouldn't stick around for a civil trial. Inheritance ensured.

And that's assuming that one is caught.

:D

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If you know that your partner is devious, then you don't marry him/her:)

its often not until boredom and/or dissatisfaction and the reality of an imminent breakup creep into a relationship that deviousness rears its ugly head.

the one with the most to lose will often have to be as devious as the one with the most to gain.

prenuptuals can instill a sense of mistrust from the word go.

a thorough prenuptual "assessment" of the partners immediate family , relatives and close friends should be higher on the list of priorities than a thorough knowledge of the thai legal system and its myriad and ever changing vagaries and interpretations.

Edited by taxexile

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Yes- I agree with you, some relatives may well be inclined sooner to draw a line under the matter than get involved in long drawn out legal to'ing & fro'ing, but as AmeriThai points out, that realy was not the point, but rather, that going to the effort of putting in place mechanisms that are legal and can protect your investment in a piece of land and the home you build on it, are possible and enforcable in Thailand.

I hear ya. I was pointing out the practical side of the issue, in that typically for a law to be enforced, there has to be a willing party in place to 'demand one's right's' so to speak. And legal issues aside, there are plenty of folks out there who are willing to reside/use your property without legally owning it. There's no land dept. mechanism that goes around to check to see if those using a property are really the owners or not. That's why squatting is so rampant here. Now if I could occupy some property with a good location (plenty of examples of street vendors doing this... but there are also those who do so with entire lots of property) without having to fear being evicted (because the owner is dead or more commonly... the property is owned by folks who have so much property that they can't keep track of it all), it doesn't matter if I can't sell it, as I know that I can profit from it in the long term by leasing it out or just conducting business right there on the spot.

The assumption that legal blocks to sale would be a deterrence in those cases wouldn't be a good idea.

:o

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