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BANGKOK 17 August 2019 19:35
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Effective Micro-organisms

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Was it worth the trip MrWiggle ?? Been thinking about a visit for a while now but it is a bit of a trek for me so any info most welcome.

cheers J

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Hi Mr Wiggle

I suggest you use the quiet time (rainy season where you are by any chance ?) to use this forum as a kind of archive (there's a good deal of useful info going back a good deal of years from some very knowledgable guys-try using the search function)

If you read a bit more through all the threads you may find all kinds of enlightenment ie. MF although not anti-organic simply does not post in this sub forum (mores the pity) so is unlikeley to comment on Saraburi farm (more positive feedback from your good self may help to stimulate more debate on the subject) but has been posting in the general farming forum recently (before your last couple of posts) so maybe like the good man you too can move on, sorry but you're beginning to sound like a stuck record.

regards J

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Does receiving the moderator gene do this to everyone ??

The moderator has the responsibility of protecting the integrity and quality of the forum. We should all respect that and take to heart his observations, even if it means self-reflection and attitude adjustment. Hey, I need a kick in the butt sometimes and I know it. don

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Thanks to this forum, I have been aware of EM for quite some time now, but have been busy with my conventional composting and this is always something that I have been meaning to experiment with, but not got round to it.

I've done a fair bit of reading up on the subject, but my brain ain't quite as sharp as it used to be, so it takes a while for me to grasp things and actually put them into practice. blink.png

I now have a rented 6 Rai and growing cassava and looking to try out some bokashi recipes, finally got round to buying the EM and molasses.

From what I understand. after fermenting the bokashi mixes, a secondary composting period is necessary to actually feed plants. This is achieved by either burying the bokashi before planting so that roots will not enter the zone for around 2 or 3 weeks, or it can be applied to the surface, but with no contact with the plants.

This suggests to me that freshly brewed bokashi is not exactly good for plants, and it takes a while for the other organisms that are naturally in the soil to get to work and turn it into a good plant feed.

This makes me wonder if bokashi could actually be used as a weedkiller when fresh. Has anybody any experience of this?

Forum is throwing a wobbly and will post this as is, will add more later

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Continuing....

I went to buy some rice bran and pick up some free rice husks today. Yet another Buddha day so couldn't buy any. There are too many holidays here!

When I get the stuff, I will do a bit of weeding, bring in the rice bran and husks to mix with the weeds/grass that I take out and try to make bokashi on the land. Once the fermenting is done I will apply as mulch on top of the weeds and see if it kills them. If it works would be great as I don't really want to use herbicide.

I will report back with success or failure

Whatever happens

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Loong,

As I understand it there are two bokashi products involved. First is the compost starter, which is fermented with rice bran etc. That you spread or mix into your compost materials, it is fermentation so should be anaerobic, in the field by covering with a tarp or bags. It is not thermophillic composting and the material is not fully decomposed. That is why it is buried in the garden.

IA

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I had to look up "thermophillic" :)

The stuff done in the field is described as aerobic bokashi. I guess that it is a bit of a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic. It's supposedly not as good as anaerobic bokashi, but easier to do. Apparently temperature should be maintained below 40 degC, so definitely not thermophillic.

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i just bought some EM and just started composing (anaerobic method). a quick question, what's the resulting end product look like? is it a sludge? how do you apply it? on the surface or dig it in? would it be better server with an olive on top?

also, during the fermentation process, would be be ok to open the container and keep adding more stuff or is that a no no?

thanks, steve

I'm only just learning about this, but from what I've read, you shouldn't keep adding stuff because you are going to be adding oxygen everytime.

Apparently you can buy a bohashi bucket to keep in your kitchen. You can add to this by putting layers of kitchen waste and "bokashi bran" as you go. The bucket has a tap near the base and you can drain off any liquid to use as fertiliser.

I guess that you could make the bokashi bran yourself. Instead of the bokashi bucket, you could use one bucket inside another. drill holes in the bottom of the inner bucket and make sure that ther is a gap for the liquid to collect.

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The difference is decomposition or fermentation, aerobic or anaerobic. Fermentation is more difficult. Bokashi bran is easy using it as a compost accelerator is also easy. The real problem is you cannot just dump in more stuff and close the lid like you can a compost heap fermentation can change to putrification if the micro biology goes wrong. Get it right and you have sauerkraut wrong and "Get this smelly sh1t out of here!"

Too many people look at composting and aeration as almost needing to have an air pump blowing through the pile all the time. Rubbish. You fish survive without as fan "dissolved" oxygen in water, same in compost.

Also forget the special buckets and devices. Anaerobic means without oxygen, completely is impossible and not needed. If you want to make an anaerobic heap just mix it on the floor and cover it with a tarp.

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I'm having difficulty getting rice bran locally, seems that everything that the small rice millers produce is already on back order. Will probably be better later in the year when the farmers are harvesting the rice. Not that there is a lot of rice farms around here. Almost exclusively sugar cane and cassava.

One thing that does worry me about bokashi is that the finished product has quite a low PH. This would probably not be a problem initially, but isaan soils are known to be on the acidic side anyway and I would have thought that adding too much bokashi could make the soil too acidic. Is bonemeal available in reasonable quantities at a reasonable price in Thailand? I would think that adding this to an acid soil would bring the PH up and make more phospate available to the plants?

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