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cathyy

Yogurt Culture

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Does anybody know a source where I can get the bacteria used to make yogurt? I'm pretty sure the commercial yogurts here are not live culture yogurt, so it won't work to just use a bit of that. A health food sort of store is a likely place to get it.

My favorite yogurt, which I eat daily, seems to have a "safe" level of melamine. No, thanks! Got a friend picking yup a yogurt maker for me, so now I just need the culture. Yet another food basic I'll be making at home...

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Probably not the answer you wanted, but I think you can use yogurt from Chokchai farm. There are "Umm...Milk!" stores and they sell milk, yogurt, ice cream, etc.

They have their farm not too far from Bangkok, thankfully within thailand :o, I started buying ice cream and yogurt from them. Only one store location I've been to though. It's on Sukhumvit soi 23.

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Juliashong, what makes you think that Chok Chai Farms yogurt will be a live culture? Do they say so on the label? I've not seen any of that brand of yogurt out here in Korat, although I am planning on using their milk to make my yogurt. Maybe I'll try to make a very small amount with some yogurt I have on hand, even though it's not labeled live culture, just to see if it works.

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I'm sorry I can't help you in your quest, but your post brought back memories of my Grandmother and her homemade yogurt. She insisted on using the live culture from her hometown in Finland, and had a friend ship it to her to the U.S.

She said the same culture had been kept alive for more than a hundred years, and insisted it's flavor was second to none.

I don't know if yogurt cultures differ....but if you can get a hold of one from Tjarlax, Finland....you've got a winner :o

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Your grandmother knew what she was talking about. Cultures do differ, and the resulting yogurts differ. The alleged "best" culture came from Bulgaria originally, in fact that variety of bacteria is named after Bulgaria. Right now I'd be willing to settle for any yogurt culture!

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Cathy our maid makes all our own yogurt - she learned at an Indian cooking class she took. As a starter she uses a couple of spoonfuls of unsweetened yogurt (the one that comes in largish jars with a red screw-top lid). I'll ask her the exact process on Monday when she comes in. Once you have made one batch you can use the culture from that set to make the next batch.

Oh, and although we have a yogurt maker she prefers to make it in a saucepan and let it set the traditional way. I must admit the yogurt is much thicker and more 'set' made this way.

Edited by Goinghomesoon

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...yogurt, ice cream, etc. They have their farm not too far from Bangkok, thankfully within thailand :D
What you say is correct, however the problem with many products is that it is common to increase the thickness (or protein content) of the finished product by added powered milk to the yogurt, in this case. The source of the powered milk might still be from outside Thailand. This assumes that they require more milk solids that they can produce in house.
I've not seen any of that brand of yogurt out here in Korat, although I am planning on using their milk to make my yogurt. Maybe I'll try to make a very small amount with some yogurt I have on hand, even though it's not labeled live culture...
Might need to use some TLC to kick it into growing, I would expect that the average yogurt here has been UHT processed to ensure long shelf-life. I think you (OP) are fully aware of the needs etc.
She said the same culture had been kept alive for more than a hundred years, and insisted it's flavor was second to none. I don't know if yogurt cultures differ...
Yes, different bacteria and different milks affect the finished product. Similar to the 'family' Pla Rar pot in Thailand.

Funny that I stumbled into this thread after looking at yogurt ideas on another web site for the weekend. My problem is/was that most of the ideas for home making I was interested in suggest adding powdered milk :o.

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You don't have to add any milk powder, even though the "recipe" may call for it. The result will be thinner and less creamy yogurt. How much so will depend on the yogurt culture used. Some make thicker yogurt than others, and some take longer to "yog" than others. It will be thicker after chilling than it is right after making.

The problem with just using a spoonful of yogurt as a starter is whether the yogurt has been treated to kill the bacteria. Most commercial yogurts have! The no doubt delicious yogurt goinghomesoon's maid makes hasn't been treated. Oh, to get a small bit of her yogurt as a starter!!! :o

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When I want to make yoghurt, I go to the next indian restaurant and buy

a take away bag.

Those little icube cooler plastic buckets make good fermentation tanks.

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any commercial yoghurt from tesco contains live bacteria. I prefer the plain onme for making yoghurt.

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No yogurt makers at Verasu, and 1 to 3 months to order. Anybody know where I can buy a yogurt maker? I tried today without a yogurt maker. I succeeded in making a quart of sour, spoiled milk.

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Hi Cathy

This is the one I used until my maid started making it. The machine is not electric and very easy to use. Costs about 600 baht in Australia. The painful part is that you have to use their starter, at least theoretically - I've heard you can use your own starter as well but never tried it www.easiyo.com/instructions/threeeasysteps/

Actually I just asked my maid about her yummy yogurt recipe and she said she lost it. Hmm, obviously that's why she hasn't made Indian food for the past month or so. The yogurt she used as a starter is a Thai brand that comes in a clear plastic jar with a screw-top red lid. The writing on the jar says "Gourmet Yogurt (Low Fat"" and it is much larger than your average small yogurt, maybe double the size.

Edited by Goinghomesoon

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Cathy, the yogurt recipe arises! The maid just handed me a photocopied sheet from when she did her Indian cooking classes at Mrs Balbirs in Sukhumvit Soi 11.

Apparently you need an earthenware container for it to work best - we use one of those rounded clay rice pots from rural Cambodia but I guess anything will do.

Ingredients:

- 6 cups whole milk

- Half cup fresh natural yogurt

1. Put the milk in a saucepan & boil over medium heat. Boil gently for at least 5 minutes, stirring all the time to prevent the milk burning & to evaporate some of the water content.

2. Remove pan from heat and pour milk into earthenware bowl.

3. Allow milk to cool for 45-60 mins until lukewarm.

4. Add starter yogurt and stir well to ensure even spread.

5. Say a few nice words to the mixture e.g. "You are going to set well". Cover and leave for at least 8 hours in coolest place in your house (not the fridge). Do not touch or move the yogurt during this time.

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Hmm, the boiling step is new to me; it could very well produce a much creamier yogurt. I got a machine in the US -have to use a voltage adapter- that is making very good yogurt for me. I'll try boiling the milk next batch and see what happens.

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