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isanbirder

Birdwatching In Isan

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I didn't even know this book, but Craig Robson is also the author of the most up-to-date books for Thailand and South-East Asia (see earlier in this thread). I use his book (the 2008 version) on SEAsia, plus the older one by Lekagul and Round, and then Google the species I want to find out about. It works well. From memory, I think the Oriental Bird Club has a gallery of birds within its region, but I haven't looked at it recently.

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My first real attempt at birding is this link here. I don't think I have the patience to take trips that are exclusively for birding but I hike a lot so am definitely far more aware of the birds around me now. I couldn't believe how many I had been missing.

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Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker, Lower NE Isaan area. 100km by road to Korat city.

I am in this part of Thailand and I had the good fortune yesterday of finally sighting a female scarlet-backed flowerpecker with possibly a juvenile in my own backyard where I have a fruiting cherry tree. I know this is a very common species and I have seen them in downtown BKK. Just like to know if fellow Isaan residents do find this bird in their local patch. I have been here nearly 2 years and this is the first time I've sighted this specie. Thanks for feedback.

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Scarlet-backed Flowerpeckers are common at Huai Saneng reservoir in Surin and pretty common in town as well.

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Thanks guys. Perhaps this flowerpecker is a little harder to spot in my patch. Btw it hasn't shown up since that one sighting.

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Many sightings of owls in Isaan?

In my partners village, in Ubon, they kill them whenever they see them, because they believe that when an owl appears someone in the village will die soon after.

Such a pity

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Whilst I've never heard of anyone actually killing an owl the locals in our village certainly don't like them. If one hoots you will hear lots of shouting and banging of dustbin lids or whatever to scare the bird away. In fact just last night a bird came into a tree near our house whilst the missis and I were sitting on the verandah. When it hooted my wife got very agitated and stated they come when someone is about to die. Despite being told not to be so silly, she got up, shouted and clapped her hands as loud as she could to chase the thing away.

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Whilst I've never heard of anyone actually killing an owl the locals in our village certainly don't like them. If one hoots you will hear lots of shouting and banging of dustbin lids or whatever to scare the bird away. In fact just last night a bird came into a tree near our house whilst the missis and I were sitting on the verandah. When it hooted my wife got very agitated and stated they come when someone is about to die. Despite being told not to be so silly, she got up, shouted and clapped her hands as loud as she could to chase the thing away.

Farmers in Europe used to kill owls until not so long ago.

Many of the owls and owlets in Asia do not hoot and generally many of the species are still quite common.

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The little Spotted Owlets are common round my area; they used to perch in the vents of the temple crematorium, but have not been there recently. A few days ago, I saw four in a row lined along a dead palm-frond. They, by the way, are diurnal.

The Barn Owl, familiar from Europe, also occurs here, though, as it is nocturnal, you won't see it very often. My only 'sighting' was a dead bird in a farmer's net.

I've also heard Collared Scops Owl and Barred Owlet.

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Barn Owls are not common in SE Asia though I have seen them in Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. Collared and Barred are pretty common.

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A happy update from my local patch:

Chestnut-winged cuckoo.

Lifer for me. Happy to snap a pic although it is an awful shot.

Recent sightings but no pics include a single Blue-bearded bee-eater and once again that

stout all black and white woodpecker in flight. Tail is almost non-existent and I could see clearly

a large white band/patch near its rump as it flapped its wings.

post-128422-0-12522900-1383728213_thumb.

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A happy update from my local patch:

Chestnut-winged cuckoo.

Lifer for me. Happy to snap a pic although it is an awful shot.

Recent sightings but no pics include a single Blue-bearded bee-eater and once again that

stout all black and white woodpecker in flight. Tail is almost non-existent and I could see clearly

a large white band/patch near its rump as it flapped its wings.

How big is the woodpecker. The only ones that spring to mind are Black-and-Buff and Heart-spotted Woodpecker.

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