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isanbirder

Birdwatching In Isan

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Many owls in Isaan?

Spotted Owlets very common (and diurnal), Barred Owlets and Collared Scops Owls fairly common.

Of the bigger owls, I have only one record, a Barn Owl which came to an untimely end in a farmer's net.

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I'm glad to hear there are some!

I hope to do a bit of birding myself when i move out to Isaan, but I'm a complete newbie. What kind of binoculars would you recommend?

Thanks in advance

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Many owls in Isaan?

Spotted Owlets very common (and diurnal), Barred Owlets and Collared Scops Owls fairly common.

Of the bigger owls, I have only one record, a Barn Owl which came to an untimely end in a farmer's net.

Many Thais are terrified of owls, it's a spirit thing, they believe they bring death. I had a friend who went to a zoo overseas with his Thai wife, they had a great time until they went into an enclosure that featured night birds. The wife spotted an owl, ran out and the day was apparently, completely ruined.

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Pardon my ignorance does this mean Taiga and Red-throated are now two separate species?

I did a quick google search and came up with Ficedula parva, F.albicilla and finally F. parva albicilla.

I am totally confused. blink.png

2 separate species alright. But the split is Red-breasted & Red-throated (Taiga)

i remember the first record for Britain of Taiga Flycatcher... back in 2003, one turned up at Flamborough Head! Twitchers from all over the UK flocked to Yorkshire to see it. Was quite an event for British birding. It was also mist netted.

Was it lost? Why would it end up there? How does something like that happen?

Please excuse my ignorance.

in this case, at the western most part of their range, when migrating south they (all migrating birds actually) can get caught up in strong weather/winds that blow them way off course....hence a few oddities turn up in places where they simply shouldn't be. We call them 'vagrants'. UK gets a handful of these every year from east & west.

Thailand gets them too... enter the 'twitcher'. wink.png

Gotcha, thanks for filling me in!

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I'm glad to hear there are some!

I hope to do a bit of birding myself when i move out to Isaan, but I'm a complete newbie. What kind of binoculars would you recommend?

Thanks in advance

Buying binoculars depends on your individual preference.

Buy a well-known brand, not a cheapie from the night market. I prefer 10 x 40; some people prefer 8 x 40 or 10 x 50. The first figure is the magnification, the second is the diameter of the object lens. What this means is that the larger object lens lets in more light. But good manufacturers these days have found ways of maximising the light admitted by the binoculars... and therefore a new 10 x 40 is as good as an old 10 x 50 (which would have been heavier.

If you have a birding friend, try his binoculars out first!

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I'm glad to hear there are some!

I hope to do a bit of birding myself when i move out to Isaan, but I'm a complete newbie. What kind of binoculars would you recommend?

Thanks in advance

Buying binoculars depends on your individual preference.

Buy a well-known brand, not a cheapie from the night market. I prefer 10 x 40; some people prefer 8 x 40 or 10 x 50. The first figure is the magnification, the second is the diameter of the object lens. What this means is that the larger object lens lets in more light. But good manufacturers these days have found ways of maximising the light admitted by the binoculars... and therefore a new 10 x 40 is as good as an old 10 x 50 (which would have been heavier.

If you have a birding friend, try his binoculars out first!

Thanks for the advice!

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I'm glad to hear there are some!

I hope to do a bit of birding myself when i move out to Isaan, but I'm a complete newbie. What kind of binoculars would you recommend?

Thanks in advance

All the big brands are eye-wateringly expensive but you will be able to use them for years. I am a Swarovski fan, but Zeiss, Leica and Nikon are also good (Nikon being the most affordable).

Apart from magnification, ergonomics are very important. You don't want to blow up to 2 Grand on bins you cannot hold comfortably. Some people are also susceptible to "rolling ball" with certain bins; you really want to be able to try before you buy.

I do a lot of my birding in forests; I think in that environment magnification is less important than the light-gather ability.

Here is a good article on what to look out for: http://www.bestbinocularsreviews.com/birdwatching-binoculars.php

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Red avadavat-has anyone sighted this bird in Isaan? If so would like to know what kind of habitat you saw it in.

I am surrounded by rice fields, corn and cassava but have never seen it.

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Red avadavat-has anyone sighted this bird in Isaan? If so would like to know what kind of habitat you saw it in.

I am surrounded by rice fields, corn and cassava but have never seen it.

Yes, I get a few every year, usually in November. This year, three. It's in a big stretch of paddyfields.

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Red avadavat-has anyone sighted this bird in Isaan? If so would like to know what kind of habitat you saw it in.

I am surrounded by rice fields, corn and cassava but have never seen it.

Here in Cambodia they like grassland near water.

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Yes, I get a few every year, usually in November. This year, three. It's in a big stretch of paddyfields.

Thanks. I take this to mean just before harvest and they come to feed on the rice.

I'll have to look harder.

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Actually, I saw my first ever Avadavats in a cage outside a Pagoda so people could release them (to be promptly hammered by the resident Shikras; Siem Reap must have the highest density of Shikras in the world).

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