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isanbirder

Birdwatching In Isan

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Thanks for this thread - it has really enthused me, after four years of birding of a different kind, to dig out the Leica binocs and Canon camera gear of a former life (lying moribund in the UK waiting for me to get an extra luggage allowance) and get out there.

Anyone got suggestions for Ubon province. No forget that - have lakes and Cambodian border hills and jungle within 30k - should keep me happy exploring for a few years. Some poster's comment about land mines above was a useful reminder though!

Hi SantiSuk,

The camera and binoculars are still good for the two legged variety. Ubon will have most of what we are seeing in Surin & Buri Ram but because of the more diverse habitats, you should be spoilt with more variety. Ubon is great and I have made 6-7 trips this year. A lot of National Park area along the Cambodian border is still closed though.

If you are driving to Ubon, PM me and we can arrange for you to break the trip up.

Let me know if you see one with more than two legs????

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I really want to contribute to this discussion but I fear I might land in trouble with the mods so I'll refrain.

Brigante7.

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Let me know if you see one with more than two legs????

I once met a farmer who had successfully bred 4 legged chickens. When I asked him what they tasted like, he said "Buggered if I know, I've never manged to catch one of the blighters". Where did that tumbleweed come from?

Does anyone know what's happened to the Buri Ram bird park? We used to visit every so often, but for a while now there's been a barrier across the gate and I've never bothered stopping to find out if you can still go in or not.

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Let me know if you see one with more than two legs????

I once met a farmer who had successfully bred 4 legged chickens. When I asked him what they tasted like, he said "Buggered if I know, I've never manged to catch one of the blighters". Where did that tumbleweed come from?

Does anyone know what's happened to the Buri Ram bird park? We used to visit every so often, but for a while now there's been a barrier across the gate and I've never bothered stopping to find out if you can still go in or not.

I can explain my 'two legged variety' remark....early onset of senile dementia. I have performed an in-depth review of my observation techniques and I can now confirm all the birds in my vicinity only have two legs.

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Being an avid bird watcher in my earlier years i asked my wife why i see so little birds in Essan

I was told eat, eat all, what I said yes everybody eat all. People think this food.

Outside country Essan, no have lots of food to eat.

Kill because eat your food you grow.

Kill and sell for food and for sell.anything can get eat.

kill anything bird frog rat if can eat or sell.Everybody know this not correct but some peaple no have food to eat.

No have job to do some people go to jungle catch eat .

this word for word. Asked you do.NO this not correct like birds in my garden.

wife's family do not need wild animals as they are fairly wealthy, with parents and all children having businesses and land with many domestic animals.

come to think of it i saw small birds in freezer on more than one occasion. on asking was told mama like to eat small bird.

what i can understand from this is people are hungry and must eat frogs, rats, lizards, dog's.

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Ah, d myth of the locals having eaten all the birds; I hear this in Vietnam all the time, too. There are actually plenty of birds in Isaan, just as there are in Vietnam. It is true that you will see few birds in the rice paddies these days, but that has more to do with the excessive use of herbicides, pesticides, fungicides and probably a few "cides" more. I have taken people bird watching in Vietnam and they were surprised at the number of birds; this after having told me there are no birds :)

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Being an avid bird watcher in my earlier years i asked my wife why i see so little birds in Essan

I was told eat, eat all, what I said yes everybody eat all. People think this food.

Outside country Essan, no have lots of food to eat.

Kill because eat your food you grow.

Kill and sell for food and for sell.anything can get eat.

kill anything bird frog rat if can eat or sell.Everybody know this not correct but some peaple no have food to eat.

No have job to do some people go to jungle catch eat .

this word for word. Asked you do.NO this not correct like birds in my garden.

wife's family do not need wild animals as they are fairly wealthy, with parents and all children having businesses and land with many domestic animals.

come to think of it i saw small birds in freezer on more than one occasion. on asking was told mama like to eat small bird.

what i can understand from this is people are hungry and must eat frogs, rats, lizards, dog's.

I don't know which part of Isan you come from, but in my area (between Krasang and Huai Rat), it is not true that there are few birds about. Nor have I seen any evidence of locals trapping and eating birds, though I suspect it happens occasionally. I hear shooting... but if they've got any sense, this will be mostly after pigeons, which are abundant here.

Yes, people do eat snails, frogs, crabs, snakes, and almost anything they can get, but to catch small birds is simply not worth the trouble. The main species which flock on the ripe rice paddy, Yellow-breasted Buntings and Baya Weavers, are very much reduced in numbers (probably, I agree, due to trapping in the past). Some people eat dogs, too, because they like the taste (like many Chinese), not because they're that short of food.

Try and count up the number of species you've seen within easy walking distance of your house; for me the total is 125 species in 18 months... and of these 30 or 40 are decidedly common.

I forgot to add... most of the land is rice paddy; otherwise there are only two small, very much disturbed woods.

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I am sure plenty of trapping goes on, but it is generally not for food. Bird meat is a lot more expensive pound for pound than pork. Thus, on the contrary, trapping becomes a problem when the population gets wealthier and serves birds, or keeps them in cages, as a status symbol.

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As to there not being a lot of birds in Isaan, I live just 10 k from downtown Surin. Since October, I have ID'd approximately 60 species and most of those just from my house/yard. There are dozens more I have seen and not yet been able to ID. And I expect that as the months go by there will be a whole lot more to come. So pretty good birding, in my novice opinion.

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I know this is an Issan forum however I am posting about a bird I saw in Bangkok. I live in a mooban and have lots of flowering bushes. I just spotted a bird that was no more than an arms length from me. It was no more than 3 or 4 cm in length and I would swear it was a hummingbird. Hovering and tiny. I didn't get a chance to note any markings but it was a greenish olive color. If not a hummingbird then what could it be? I looked up sunbirds and from the info I gathered they are at least 10cm.

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I know this is an Issan forum however I am posting about a bird I saw in Bangkok. I live in a mooban and have lots of flowering bushes. I just spotted a bird that was no more than an arms length from me. It was no more than 3 or 4 cm in length and I would swear it was a hummingbird. Hovering and tiny. I didn't get a chance to note any markings but it was a greenish olive color. If not a hummingbird then what could it be? I looked up sunbirds and from the info I gathered they are at least 10cm.

Hummingbirds are an American family; there are none here.... and even if someone kept one in captivity (already difficult), it is highly unlikely to survive as an escape. From the behaviour it must have been a sunbird, probably an Olive-backed. If it was really only 3 or 4 cms long, it cannot have been a bird; there just aren't any so small here. An outside possibility is one of the humming-bird hawk-moths (I don't know the species here), but presumably you can tell a bird from a moth! With these very small birds, it is easy to think they're smaller than they are; sometimes they seem to look just like bumble-bees.

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In a cherry tree, two meter from my window, I found this smal birds today. Smaler than the cherry blades. 5-6 cm I think.

Colour of the man dark blue and black, and his wife brown.

The house they buildt is about 5 cm high.

I live in south Isaan.

post-21674-1273241807_thumb.jpg

post-21674-1273241849_thumb.jpg

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Purple Sunbird.

(Nok kin plee dum muang, is its old Thai name)

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Yes, people do eat snails, frogs, crabs, snakes, and almost anything they can get, but to catch small birds is simply not worth the trouble.

Mike, I am sorry to say that I regularly see our villagers use catapults and air rifles for catching then eating birds here (8k from Surin in the Presat direction)

I also see a lot of those beautifully small sunbirds too.

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Yes, people do eat snails, frogs, crabs, snakes, and almost anything they can get, but to catch small birds is simply not worth the trouble.

Mike, I am sorry to say that I regularly see our villagers use catapults and air rifles for catching then eating birds here (8k from Surin in the Presat direction)

I also see a lot of those beautifully small sunbirds too.

I see the kids with catapults, but have never yet seen anybody with birds they've shot or trapped (and I doubt whether our villagers are any more enlightened than yours!). It's certainly not done as a money-earner. (I think I was referring mainly to the cagebird trade in that post, Dave).

Purple Sunbirds are common wherever there is woodland... and if you're lucky you may see an even more spectacular Sunbird, the Ruby-cheeked. The male is brilliant emerald above, bright yellow below, with red and orange markings round the head.

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