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isanbirder

Birdwatching In Isan

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Anybody seeing any winter visitors yet? Here in Chonburi, I had Whiskered Tern over the sea on Wednesday and yesterday took a drive out to Bang Phra reservoir where I saw two Yellow Wagtail and a small group of Pacific Golden Plovers (as well as a host of other resident species).

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All I've had so far are Chinese Pond-herons, two on 28th and two this morning. Not even a Brown Shrike.

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Just after reading your response I took the dog out as usual not expecting anything but I did see a Brown Shrike perched on an upright farm sprinkler!

Also of note for my patch a pair of Vinous-breasted Starling which I've never seen before in over 3 years here.

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First Brown Shrike on September 6 ( I usually get some in August). Otherwise very little else.

An early (or late) Painted Stork this morning ch

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I am spending a few months by the seaside 20 kms south of Prachaub Khirikhan town, and I would appreciate some insight into a surprising bird watching experience I had last night. I was in the garden at about 6.30 p.m. and I saw what I thought was a dead bird. It was lying on its back and it was upside down on a small bush. Its wings were outspread and they were about 18 -20 inches from tip to tip. The bird looked to me like a juvenile Brahminy kite, but I am only a novice bird watcher. As I turned to tell my wife about this beautiful bird, it flew away. I am very happy that it was not dead, but sorry that I didn't have more time to look at such a bird at close quarters. My wife says that she remembers seeing birds resting upside down when she was a child in the countryside more than 50 years ago. I've looked on the internet for information about birds resting in this fashion, but I haven't found anything helpful. I would be grateful for anything anyone can tell me.

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In 60 years' birding, I don't remember ever seeing a live bird lying on its back. Sorry!

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Thank you. I've also never seen such a thing before. Perhaps it was a sick bird.

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Thank you. I've also never seen such a thing before. Perhaps it was a sick bird.

Actually, I checked with my wife who said that my eyesight was at fault. It was not a kite, but an owl. She claims to have seen owls hanging upside down before, and the question of whether they do or not certainly appears on the internet.

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At last things are beginning to liven up a bit!

Burmese Shrike on 29th, White-cheeked Drongo today, and the first few Black Drongos over the last week.

But some species are late or much reduced in numbers. Barn Swallows usually start coming back here in mid-July, and I get a few most days from then on. By now the place should be full of them. This year they started as usual, but I'm still only seeing them once or twice a week.

Much the same for Common and White-throated Kingfishers. A few records in early September, but none since.

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Where I am it's been a very slow start. That Brown Shrike I saw last month is no longer around. Previous years there were lots of them around the farms.

Even Black Drongo numbers are way down and no sign of Chestnut headed BEs. And no Common KF as yet.

Was out on the lake 3 mornings ago and saw what is the best bird this year: a Black Capped KF which I haven't seen for over 2 years.

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Here in Bangsaen, Chonburi, one Black Drongo over two weeks ago and no more since. Black-winged Cuckooshrike a few days ago. A possible Burmese Shrike a few days ago, though maybe just a brown. None since. A probable A. Paradise Flycatcher.

Finally, this morning, two Ashy Drongs (white-cheeked) on my TV antenna and two Asian Brown Flycatchers in my garden.

Ashy are the more common drongo on my soi at this time of year. Nice to have them back. And the Flycatchers stay around all season as well.

Other than that, not much to report though i haven't got out to the local fish ponds in about ten days. Hope to do so on Friday.

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Wintering birds are still only coming in dribs and drabs (3 Barn Swallows this morning!), but at least there's something nice most days.

Yesterday, it was 4 Little Cormorants (my max before was 3). Today it was a couple of glorious male Black-naped Orioles. Some of these yellow birds, the colour simply leaps out at you from the foliage.

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It has been a very slow autumn here in Buriram, hotter than usual, which is possibly why many wintering birds have been slow coming south.

A few days ago, the wintering raptors starting arriving, and today I had a splendid male Eastern Marsh Harrier and also a young bird. Ironically, I also saw the same number of Barn Swallows over the paddies.... two. (There are some on the telegraph wires... but my walks rarely take me near the roads.)

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I have seen many kinds of birds near the Phanom Rung -Hill temple. The one rare bird is the The Greater Coucal . They say if you see this bird , it will be lucky day for you. There are other birds like Hummingbirds, Egrets and cranes in the rice fields.

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I have seen many kinds of birds near the Phanom Rung -Hill temple. The one rare bird is the The Greater Coucal . They say if you see this bird , it will be lucky day for you. There are other birds like Hummingbirds, Egrets and cranes in the rice fields.

Greater Coucal are actually very common. Also, there are no hummingbirds in Thailand. What you're probably seeing is sunbirds. Your cranes may well be storks, most common are Openbill.

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