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isanbirder

Birdwatching In Isan

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If you are looking for a new challenge blind birding is the 'hot' item in the USA birding competitions -- the better ones can hear a bird and identify its call long before the clumsy sighted person can visually spot it:

http://www.grady.uga.edu/birdersouth/blindbirding.html

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/...uttaSight/tips/

There are schools for the blind in both Roi Et and Khorat as well as KK all part of the CFBT Foundation...

Some good recordings from Khao Yai here to get started (as you may already know):

http://home.tiscali.nl/jvanderw/thailand03/sounds.html

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If you are looking for a new challenge blind birding is the 'hot' item in the USA birding competitions -- the better ones can hear a bird and identify its call long before the clumsy sighted person can visually spot it:

http://www.grady.uga.edu/birdersouth/blindbirding.html

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/...uttaSight/tips/

Some good recordings from Khao Yai here to get started (as you may already know):

http://home.tiscali.nl/jvanderw/thailand03/sounds.html

Of course all birders try to learn as many calls as they can; it makes life easier. I must admit that I have always been very bad at this... I just don't seem to have the ear for it (I'm not at all musical either).

Birding competitions... a good way to raise funds where needed, but otherwise, no thank you!

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I was only suggesting that it might be a fun thing for you to go to one of the schools for the blind and give a talk to the kids about some of the bird calls -- especially since there is a website with the calls from Khao Yai...

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post-46701-1273393548_thumb.jpg

Just wondering what sort of birds are normally tagged in Thailand? We came across this guy a few weeks ago, he had a red tag around his leg. We think he was hit by a car as he was crouched on the side of the road on one of our Isaan road trips. He was not looking too happy and died a day later despite hubby trying to doctor him up :)

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@Goinghomesoon..

one of the most important bird ringing areas in Thailand takes place at Laem Pak Bia (on the coast) near Petchaburi. Many birds, not just shorebirds, are routinely ringed/tagged here.

Its a great place to visit, particularly if you take a boat trip around the sand spit.

The bird in your pic is a Lesser Coucal, found throughout the Kingdom. They typically fly very low to the ground (very secretive birds) so a car strike is highly likely..

edit: did the ring/tag have any numbers on it ? Also see that the bird is tethered with red string.. sure you aren't confusing that with a 'tag' ?

(a technique used to catch large birds of prey is to use a live tethered bait..)

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Let me know if you see one with more than two legs????

I once met a farmer who had successfully bred 4 legged chickens. When I asked him what they tasted like, he said "Buggered if I know, I've never manged to catch one of the blighters". Where did that tumbleweed come from?

Does anyone know what's happened to the Buri Ram bird park? We used to visit every so often, but for a while now there's been a barrier across the gate and I've never bothered stopping to find out if you can still go in or not.

I was in the Buri Ram bird park this week if we mean the same place, couldn't believe my luck as i've been developing a real interest for bird watching over here and stumbled upon it visiting friends. The barrier was down but we ventured in and there was no one about. There were still signs up stating that it was a non hunting area and the place was well kept so i guess it is still open and within a few minutes we came across a load of birds that were new to me. Unfortunately i didn't have my book to hand but i recognized Indian cormorants, red headed swamp hens, common tailor birds, painted storks, a barn owl, cinnamon bittern, loads of egrets, black collared starling, spider hunters and fantails just to name a few. the watch tower was very impressive and if it wasn't for some heavy rain i would have stayed a lot longer.

There were big statues of the local birds presumably for the kids and an education centre. I was very impressed with the whole project and will make a point of passing through better equipt and with more time on my hands in the near future hopefully. I'll find the address and post it up shortly.

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i think this is the website referred to earlier, i've been meaning to make a point of listing the birds i've spotted but just haven't had the time lately. it's a great site if you're interested in this kind of thing.

http://www.thaibirding.com/

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Yes I think we all have done our fair share of bird watching

in the land of smiles. :)

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/quote]

I was in the Buri Ram bird park this week if we mean the same place, couldn't believe my luck as i've been developing a real interest for bird watching over here and stumbled upon it visiting friends. The barrier was down but we ventured in and there was no one about. There were still signs up stating that it was a non hunting area and the place was well kept so i guess it is still open and within a few minutes we came across a load of birds that were new to me. Unfortunately i didn't have my book to hand but i recognized Indian cormorants, red headed swamp hens, common tailor birds, painted storks, a barn owl, cinnamon bittern, loads of egrets, black collared starling, spider hunters and fantails just to name a few. the watch tower was very impressive and if it wasn't for some heavy rain i would have stayed a lot longer.

There were big statues of the local birds presumably for the kids and an education centre. I was very impressed with the whole project and will make a point of passing through better equipt and with more time on my hands in the near future hopefully. I'll find the address and post it up shortly.

Good news... I've never been there, even though I live not far from Buriram. What, by the way, are red-headed swamphens? A new name to me!

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/quote]

I was in the Buri Ram bird park this week if we mean the same place, couldn't believe my luck as i've been developing a real interest for bird watching over here and stumbled upon it visiting friends. The barrier was down but we ventured in and there was no one about. There were still signs up stating that it was a non hunting area and the place was well kept so i guess it is still open and within a few minutes we came across a load of birds that were new to me. Unfortunately i didn't have my book to hand but i recognized Indian cormorants, red headed swamp hens, common tailor birds, painted storks, a barn owl, cinnamon bittern, loads of egrets, black collared starling, spider hunters and fantails just to name a few. the watch tower was very impressive and if it wasn't for some heavy rain i would have stayed a lot longer.

There were big statues of the local birds presumably for the kids and an education centre. I was very impressed with the whole project and will make a point of passing through better equipt and with more time on my hands in the near future hopefully. I'll find the address and post it up shortly.

Good news... I've never been there, even though I live not far from Buriram. What, by the way, are red-headed swamphens? A new name to me!

My apologies, i think the official name is Purple Swamphen - this is what happens when i don't have my book to hand!

I'm amazed they aren't highly threatened, they just look so conspicuous shuffling through the grass, their plumage is is such start contrast to anything else around, they stand out like sore thumbs and seem such an easy target for predators/ hunters

post-80347-1273906241_thumb.jpg

post-80347-1273906258_thumb.jpg

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My apologies, i think the official name is Purple Swamphen - this is what happens when i don't have my book to hand!

I'm amazed they aren't highly threatened, they just look so conspicuous shuffling through the grass, their plumage is is such start contrast to anything else around, they stand out like sore thumbs and seem such an easy target for predators/ hunters

I think they're lucky in that they're not good to eat! Friends have seen them in Surin, and I've seen them in Chiangrai, but I'm still waiting for one to turn up on my local patch.

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Let me know if you see one with more than two legs????

I once met a farmer who had successfully bred 4 legged chickens. When I asked him what they tasted like, he said "Buggered if I know, I've never manged to catch one of the blighters". Where did that tumbleweed come from?

Does anyone know what's happened to the Buri Ram bird park? We used to visit every so often, but for a while now there's been a barrier across the gate and I've never bothered stopping to find out if you can still go in or not.

I was in the Buri Ram bird park this week if we mean the same place, couldn't believe my luck as i've been developing a real interest for bird watching over here and stumbled upon it visiting friends. The barrier was down but we ventured in and there was no one about. There were still signs up stating that it was a non hunting area and the place was well kept so i guess it is still open and within a few minutes we came across a load of birds that were new to me. Unfortunately i didn't have my book to hand but i recognized Indian cormorants, red headed swamp hens, common tailor birds, painted storks, a barn owl, cinnamon bittern, loads of egrets, black collared starling, spider hunters and fantails just to name a few. the watch tower was very impressive and if it wasn't for some heavy rain i would have stayed a lot longer.

There were big statues of the local birds presumably for the kids and an education centre. I was very impressed with the whole project and will make a point of passing through better equipt and with more time on my hands in the near future hopefully. I'll find the address and post it up shortly.

As far as I know, there are two bird parks in the area, both off the Buri Ram - Prakonchai road. The one I was referring to was officially called the Buri Ram bird park, and is still sign posted on the left, just before the road crosses the big reservoir as you head out of Buri Ram. I heard it has turned into a hotel now. It was free to enter and had a childrens play area, some very big dinosaur statues, crocodile and deer enclosures and some aviaries, as well as walkways along the edge of the reservoir. It was a good place to bring the kids. The other is closer to Prakonchai, on another reservoir, and is designated as a non hunting area, so could be the one you found.

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Let me know if you see one with more than two legs????

I once met a farmer who had successfully bred 4 legged chickens. When I asked him what they tasted like, he said "Buggered if I know, I've never manged to catch one of the blighters". Where did that tumbleweed come from?

Does anyone know what's happened to the Buri Ram bird park? We used to visit every so often, but for a while now there's been a barrier across the gate and I've never bothered stopping to find out if you can still go in or not.

I was in the Buri Ram bird park this week if we mean the same place, couldn't believe my luck as i've been developing a real interest for bird watching over here and stumbled upon it visiting friends. The barrier was down but we ventured in and there was no one about. There were still signs up stating that it was a non hunting area and the place was well kept so i guess it is still open and within a few minutes we came across a load of birds that were new to me. Unfortunately i didn't have my book to hand but i recognized Indian cormorants, red headed swamp hens, common tailor birds, painted storks, a barn owl, cinnamon bittern, loads of egrets, black collared starling, spider hunters and fantails just to name a few. the watch tower was very impressive and if it wasn't for some heavy rain i would have stayed a lot longer.

There were big statues of the local birds presumably for the kids and an education centre. I was very impressed with the whole project and will make a point of passing through better equipt and with more time on my hands in the near future hopefully. I'll find the address and post it up shortly.

As far as I know, there are two bird parks in the area, both off the Buri Ram - Prakonchai road. The one I was referring to was officially called the Buri Ram bird park, and is still sign posted on the left, just before the road crosses the big reservoir as you head out of Buri Ram. I heard it has turned into a hotel now. It was free to enter and had a childrens play area, some very big dinosaur statues, crocodile and deer enclosures and some aviaries, as well as walkways along the edge of the reservoir. It was a good place to bring the kids. The other is closer to Prakonchai, on another reservoir, and is designated as a non hunting area, so could be the one you found.

The one i was in sounds like the second one you mentioned as i didn't see any dinosaurs. Which would you say was better for bird watching??

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As far as I know, there are two bird parks in the area, both off the Buri Ram - Prakonchai road. The one I was referring to was officially called the Buri Ram bird park, and is still sign posted on the left, just before the road crosses the big reservoir as you head out of Buri Ram. I heard it has turned into a hotel now. It was free to enter and had a childrens play area, some very big dinosaur statues, crocodile and deer enclosures and some aviaries, as well as walkways along the edge of the reservoir. It was a good place to bring the kids. The other is closer to Prakonchai, on another reservoir, and is designated as a non hunting area, so could be the one you found.

The one i was in sounds like the second one you mentioned as i didn't see any dinosaurs. Which would you say was better for bird watching??

That may be a moot point, as I don't know the status of the first one. Every time I've driven past it in the last couple of years, which admittedly hasn't been too often, there's been a barrier across the entrance, and the wife says she heard it was being turned into a hotel. I'll have to stop and ask them next time I go past. It's a shame it isn't like it was before, when you could just drive in. There was also a large restaurant and some bungalow type accomodation there too. A good time to visit was when the sun was setting as many birds would fly in to roost along the shore of the reservoir. Apparantly it also attracts a lot of migratory birds in April and November each year.

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I used to live in surin, and have now moved to Pak Chong, Nakhon Rathisima province, Isaan. We are close to Khao Yai National park. Approx 350 recorded species, including four types of Hornbill (the King of birds) - Great, Oriental Pied, Brown and Wreathred. I enter the park about once a week. Last trip from memory we saw 3 species of Hornbill, Indian Roller, Lapwing, Spotted Dove, Bulbuls, Jungle Myna, Black-shouldred Kite, Harrier, Lesser Racket-tailed Drongo, Eurasian Kinfisher, White-breasted King-fisher and many others. One of the best places in Asia to watch birds. Definetly the best place in Isaan. :)

Hello,

How do you like Pak Chong? I have been looking at a place to retire. We love nature and like to garden, country life with mountain view-both my wife and I. Also it is not too far from BKK. Any suggestions or pointers?

Thanks,

Bill

kcazone@hotmail.com

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