Jump to content
BANGKOK 19 August 2019 05:09
Sign in to follow this  
ZOVOX

Becoming A Teacher

Recommended Posts

When you go for a teaching post, are you always asked to do a demo lesson ?

I have no teaching experience, so any advice on demo lessons would be appreciated. Thanks !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Have one ready, or two (maybe for prathom 4 and matayom 4). If you give the person who's interviewing you a printed copy of your lesson plan, that would be very impressive. Assuming you follow the plan.

I got hired real fast the first time after doing two quick demos to classes of 50 teenagers. The next time I applied somewhere, I did a smashing demo, to the point where the entire class (Matayom 4) sang a Broadway show tune at the end. But I didn't get hired because they preselected somebody else. But I got preselected at the next place without a demo.

Just be ready. And when they ask, try to stall for prep time and ask what kind of class, what they're learning, etc. So that you can at least modify what you might have prepped for.

In the phone call setting up the interview, you should always ask as many questions as possible. Ask if they'll want a demo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you new.. count on it.. They sit in the back.. look about.. then if you have prepared... things go fine.. But make sure you're prepared and the 20 minutes go quickly... Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been asked to give a demo lesson as such but at my first job at ECC the head teacher did come into my classroom and sat and watched for around 20 miutes or so. In the four years since I have changed employers twice and have had a couple of occasions when the big cheese has come in to observe.

Have a couple of lessons ready that you can use to demonstrate your teaching ability. Giving directions and telling the time are sure fire winners. Easy to teach and easy to learn. Those free maps that are given out at BTS stations are great for giving directions lessons.

Send me a PM. You are welcome to my lesson plans on these subjects.

Good luck - don't worry - everybody feels nervous before that first ever lesson Everybody has to start some where and most DOS recognise this fact and if they do their job correctly that first observation is used to give guidance rather than criticise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you sure you are applying for the right job?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Zovox,

Think about some kind of training (however minimal it will help with your confidence) it's going to be pretty hard to teach you how to teach via this website mate!

Even 'proper' teachers and certificate teachers get nervous before their first lesson (or demo lesson) I dread to think how someone with absolutely no idea feels!

Would you want someone like you teaching your children (if you have any)? Honestly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't want to seem like we're ganging up on you, Zovox, but I have to agree with the above posters... I'm not saying that EVERYONE has to get a TEFL, etc., because there are those with natural talent who just seem to take to it like a fish to water- but you don't seem to be slipping into things quite so easily. I'd suggest you take a look at getting some training.

"Steven"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed.

Back in the middle of the 90's I was asked to teach in Phuket for a month . Thought it would be a piece of piss. How wrong was I! Went and got CELTA'd up back in the UK and then the lights started to come on. The nerves will come and go. For new classes I always get a few butterflies but they soon vanish. I don't know about the best place to take a course in Thailand - over on Ajarn.com there used to be plenty of threads on this topic but they didn't seem to be too objective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Agreed.

Back in the middle of the 90's I was asked to teach in Phuket for a month .  Thought it would be a piece of piss.  How wrong was I!  Went and got CELTA'd up back in the UK and then the lights started to come on.  The nerves will come and go.  For new classes I always get a few butterflies but they soon vanish.  I don't know about the best place to take a course in Thailand - over on Ajarn.com there used to be plenty of threads on this topic but they didn't seem to be too objective.

Hey, Longsands, that's a very generous appraisal of the slugfests that used to prevail on that subject. There is no sureproof way to evaluate all the courses, and no way to evaluate the trading of insults that prevails on the forums.

Any course is better than no course at all. The longer the course, the better it is, all other things being equal. You might want to visit because you might be put off by an overly stuffy Brit or an overly casual Aussie, etc. A course that's too cheap may not be worth any time and money at all, and some courses might be overpriced above US$1,500. Without intending to criticize Longsands' experience - in most cases, why take a course overseas if you intend your first teaching years to be in Thailand?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sometimes yes, sometimes no.  Have one ready, or two (maybe for prathom 4 and matayom 4).  If you give the person who's interviewing you a printed copy of your lesson plan, that would be very impressive.  Assuming you follow the plan.

I got hired real fast the first time after doing two quick demos to classes of 50 teenagers.  The next time I applied somewhere, I did a smashing demo, to the point where the entire class (Matayom 4) sang a Broadway show tune at the end.  But I didn't get hired because they preselected somebody else.  But I got preselected at the next place without a demo.

Just be ready.  And when they ask, try to stall for prep time and ask what kind of class, what they're learning, etc.  So that you can at least modify what you might have prepped for.

In the phone call setting up the interview, you should always ask as many questions as possible.  Ask if they'll want a demo.

Long time no see, eh, PB ?

remember me?

Just got an interview with one of the better English schools in Thailand. Gave me a pop quiz - what's your lesson plan for such and such a situation. I made it up on the spot, though I had spend as much time as possible reading up on the education of kids in the preceeding two weeks(good thing, otherwise I might've been washed off into the Andaman). Got the interview through good connections, now they want a demo.

Asking for a demo is fair enough in my book, just so long as I have enough time to prepare a lesson. My experience with the age group in question is limited; any constructive suggestions is much appreciated.

Cheerio.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, phormio- *I* remember you! Cheers, and good luck! Though, remember, they're *ALL* the "better, bestest" schools, or at least that's what they'll all tell you- let us know how it works out!

"Steven"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had to teach demo classes a couple of times, first to get a job with a teaching company and the second to help that company secure a contract with a school. The first demo was pretty easy, it was a small private class, about 6 students, and while I'd had no prior classroom teaching experience, I'd done lots of tutoring and corporate training. The only thing different about this class was that I was teaching English, not how to use software. I wasn't really nervous about that demo class, it was the first Matthayom class, a week later, that really put the butterflies in my stomach! :o

My second demo class came after I'd already had several months teaching experience. I was told that I would have a class of 15 Pathom students, instead, I wound up in front of 50 Matthayom students! :D I had to throw out the lesson plan I'd walked in with and re-use a lesson I'd used for a class a couple of months earlier. This sort of mis-information is very common and so the most important thing that I have learned is to be FLEXIBLE! :D Don't let the Thai administration's total lack of planning and competence throw you :D .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^Very much agree with above! In fact, being ready for this kind of thing at the interview is a sort of test in itself- for how well you'll deal with the school doing this kind of thing on a ROUTINE basis! :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Agreed.

Back in the middle of the 90's I was asked to teach in Phuket for a month .  Thought it would be a piece of piss.  How wrong was I!  Went and got CELTA'd up back in the UK and then the lights started to come on.  The nerves will come and go.  For new classes I always get a few butterflies but they soon vanish.  I don't know about the best place to take a course in Thailand - over on Ajarn.com there used to be plenty of threads on this topic but they didn't seem to be too objective.

Hey, Longsands, that's a very generous appraisal of the slugfests that used to prevail on that subject. There is no sureproof way to evaluate all the courses, and no way to evaluate the trading of insults that prevails on the forums.

Any course is better than no course at all. The longer the course, the better it is, all other things being equal. You might want to visit because you might be put off by an overly stuffy Brit or an overly casual Aussie, etc. A course that's too cheap may not be worth any time and money at all, and some courses might be overpriced above US$1,500. Without intending to criticize Longsands' experience - in most cases, why take a course overseas if you intend your first teaching years to be in Thailand?

Yeah PB, just being a bit diplomatic about those threads. I never contributed to them as they never actually went anywhere.

Whilst discussing a lesson plan with a recently employed teacher, who came certified from a certain Thai establishment, he stopped me in mid-sentence and asked 'What's the difference between a countable and uncountable noun?' :o I asked him about the course and it appeared to be a typical Thai education - pay your money, have sanook, then walk out with a certificate.

In contrast, I did my CELTA in the UK the minimum entry level was a BA. After they received proof of my degree I then had to complete a test. I was then invited to an interview, where I was asked to give examples of passive past perfect continuous usage, etc. They then told me how intense the course was going to be, questioned my resolve, and put it to me to really consider my application. There were 32 on my course, about a quarter either dropped out or were failed. There was no fun in the sun, believe me.

So for me, and please understand that this is based on my limited experience, I value a certificate from the UK/USA/Australia over one obtained here. Please also bear in mind I'm talking about newbies to teaching, not those who have been teaching for x-years and now possibly need a certificate to continue here. For these guys I agree with you PB, however if they wish to teach later in another country I'm not so sure how much weight a Thai certificate will have.

Edited by Longsands

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Longsands. The CELTA is, overall, still the best known and most widely respcted TEFL cert around the world... Still just the basics of the basics though.

When I was a hirer, I looked for folks with experience AND a CELTA. With the CELTA, I knew for sure what that person had (hopefully!) learned. I'll bet other hirers with a CELTA or DELTA think along similar lines...

The CELTA is not just useful to newbies either... I took the CELTA course 10 years into teaching. It helped me to see some bad habits I'd aquired over the years, and the course gave me a huge boost in creative energy, because the CELTA course really encourages one to go the extra mile to not lose face among your fellow students :D

Didn't help my spelling much, though :o

I feel obligated to add that there are some good teacher-training courses in Thailand. :D

But none offer to improve your spelling :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...