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BANGKOK 19 August 2019 04:31
drtreelove

Insect pests, plant diseases and integrated pest management

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A friend just gave me this organic pesticide to try (pictured); which I haven't opened yet. But it looks like an interesting formula: neem, eucalyptus some kind of worm extract and other herbal ingredients. Note that when using botanical pesticides like this you need to do weekly applications.

The folks on the Southern Thailand forum may be able to help you find a farm store in Surat Thani if you can't find what you want in Samui.

If you print the picture of the container and take it with you, the chemical store could possibly order it or provide an alternative. If you can't find a true organic solution that works for you, then the least toxic alternative in the chemical pesticides may be pyrethroids (relatively low mammalian toxicity), like permethrin (least expensive), bifenthrin (more residual effect), cypermethrin or alphacypermethrin (Chaindrite Stedfast 4) But these chemicals are going to wipe out the beneficial critters that eat the pests too and defeat the organic ideal of allowing biological control balance; and they are highly toxic to fish with even a little spray drift.

Good luck. Don

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Hi Don 

Looks interesting !!

Any chance of some close ups of the label (ingredients), is there some form of "sticker" in the formula or do you need to add one ? Whats the application rate of this stuff, how far does your 180 baht go ? 

cheers for now J

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Hi Don

Looks interesting !!

Any chance of some close ups of the label (ingredients), is there some form of "sticker" in the formula or do you need to add one ? Whats the application rate of this stuff, how far does your 180 baht go ?

cheers for now J

Mix at 50 cc/ml per 20 L of water. I can't read Thai but I would not expect a surfactant to be included. I almost always add a spreader/sticker to the spray solution. This bottle doesn't list the total amount, but it looks like 500 to 700 ml. So you could mix at least 500 liters of solution for the 180 baht. Apply every 5 days for leafy crops, 7 to 10 days for fruit crops.

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Mix at 50 cc/ml per 20 L of water. I can't read Thai but I would not expect a surfactant to be included. I almost always add a spreader/sticker to the spray solution. This bottle doesn't list the total amount, but it looks like 500 to 700 ml. So you could mix at least 500 liters of solution for the 180 baht.

Whoops, that's what happens to the math when the wife's calling with dinner on the table. Make that 200 liters of solution, with which I have sprayed about 1 rai of medium size lamyai trees.

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Whoops. lost track of where I made my last post on this forum... ! :) There is some life here...

Yes, the problem of island living sometimes is finding what you need, I discovered though from a Nursery friend on Koh Phengnan, that what they sell as BS2 has Neem oil in it or is Neem Oil... sold in those little bottles... at 80 baht each... that gets rather expensive... Sold at most of the nurseries.

I'll print off the labels you have pictured above & go to the shop in Nanton & see if they have or can get... It would be good to find out the days to harvest after an application. I suspect that it is written on the label, just have to get a Thai/English speaker to translate. :D

I am still looking for Borax, on Samui, if anyone knows where to find it here, I would be pleased to know!

Jim

Edited by samuijimmy

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Hi Samuijimmy Just picked up some borax from a pharmacy (the old fashioned type) in Chiang Rai . The pharmacist knew it as boric acid, 20 baht per 100 g cheers for now J

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Hello everyone,

I usually don't have a problem with growing the small Thai melon แตงไทย, dtaaeng thai, I think it's a type of musk melon. but stripey like the Thai water melon.

This season, they've sprouted quickly as usual, but as soon as they make their first true leaves, something is eating them. The leaves are being eaten faster than new ones can grow, so they are all dead!

I have noted an insect that looks very much like our Ladybird on the leaves at times. I'm partially colour blind, so cannot be sure, maybe yellow with black spots, not red with black spots like I am used to.

Now ladybirds in the UK are the gardener's friend, I've always left these insects alone because I thought that they were the same as ladybirds and a beneficial predator.

Can anyone tell me, are these "Ladybirds" friends or foe?

I don't know if it is relevant, but believe it or not, I have been unable to grow cucumber in this area. They always die after flowering, but never fruit. Normal melon never even get to flowering stage before dying. The only successes I've had here with this type is with snake gourds, dtaaeng thai and pumpkins. Other squashes have refused to co-operate. The wax gourd grows well but never fruits. This year the Pumpkins have disappointed, grown well but no fruits and now the dtaaeng thai won't even get much past the seed leaf stage.

Can anyone enlighten this ignoramus?

Thanks for any suggestions.

Edited by loong

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this is mealy bug an unarmoured scale

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and this is adult whitefly (their eggs look a little like apids)

here's some ways of dealing with mealybug

Step

1

Identify mealybugs by looking on the undersides of leaves and around leaf joints. These insects look like small (1/10 to 1/8 of an inch) balls of cotton. Mealybug-damaged plants look withered and sickly and may have sticky sap on the leaves and stems.

Step

2

Spray a strong jet of water directly on to the affected area of the plant. The stream washes the insects off. This is the easiest way to control mealybugs.

Step

3

Spray with a soap/oil mixture if the water alone doesn't do the job. Mix 1 tsp. insecticidal soap, 1/2 tsp. horticultural oil, and 1 quart water in a spray bottle. There are also numerous chemical products available for the control of mealybugs.

Step

4

Use rubbing alcohol and a cotton swab to treat minor infestations. Dab the rubbing alcohol directly onto the insects.

Step

5

Try purchasing and releasing a natural predator called mealybug destroyer (Cryptolaemus montrouzieri) for serious infestations. Place the mealybug destroyers directly on the infested plant.

Step

6

On an ongoing basis, attract other types of predatory insects, such as parasitic wasps (Leptomastix dactylopii), that will consume and control mealybugs. Grow their favorite plants such as dill, fennel, coreopsis and brightly colored flowers near the mealybug-prone plants.

for the whitefly you could try a simple homemade remedy

mix 1 tablespoon dishwashing liquid detergent with 1 cup of cooking oil; add 1 to 2.5 teaspoons of this solution to 1 cup of water, spray onto plants every 10 days

or a slightly more potent version with some garlic or other botanicals as discussed earlier in this thread starting here relevant post

or try a commercial neem spray which will take time but disrupt the breeding cycle

cheers Jandtaa

mealybug's a real pest,

when I worked in India (oilfield) a chemist told me during a conversation about plants in general and plant-pest s in particular how to get rid of some of the bugs.

wetten the affected bush/plant veggie and then sprinkle/dust white flour or cornmeal onte the affected area/leaves.

I tried that and Bingo for some time no more pests,same i did on my christmas flower poinsettia,no more wiltering ugle appearance,bought the plants 2 months ago and still red leaves/flowers.

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Welcome to the new organic sub-forum Soidog2 :) !!

Thanks for sharing the pics !! Please share any info you have on growing avocado using organic methods and keep us updated on the progress (after 10 years exciting times no doubt !!)

may your flowers all bear fruit

Jandtaa

Thanks, I have a question for you.

In my garden there are Cherimoyas, Oranges, Star Fruit, Grapes , Tomatoes, Hot peppers, Lemons, Mangoes, Durian, Figs, Papaya and the list goes on.

My biggest pest is the fruit fly, Lays eggs in the young fruit resulting in total loss sometime.

I do grow fruit commercially and know how to get rid of it, I'd rather not use chemicals in my garden.

Is there anything organic I can use to combat this annoying pest ?

Regards

Hi SD2

Sorry It's Taken so long (just been re-reading some threads and found I hadn't replied)

Herbal extract for use on fruit fly

also came across a recipe to use in bait traps

1 litre water

1 cup brown sugar

1 tablespoon bakers yeast

1 tablespoon Vegemite

1 cup Urine

Mix ingredients and let stand for five days before

using. Change every week.

Hope it helps, If you try it please let us know if it's effective as the missus has been buying all sorts of fruit tree seedlings over the past weeks.

hi fellow gardener,good tip about organic pestcontrol,even I have some doubts about adding Urine ,as the liquid ()contain certain harmful bacteria,some volk even drink their own some times,(Johans believeit or not).

Can be livestock urine or use Pla Ra from the missus kitche nor citric acid or vinegar just an idea, not to critizice anybody.

How do you apply,spray with the cropduster or add to the soil.

pls advise

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Any recommendations for organic pest control? Especially for the red ant. What about Neem oil?

Probably the most popular and most effective "knock down" organic insecticide is pyrethrum, the natural chrysanthemum flower extract. http://www.livingwithbugs.com/permethr.html In a solution mixed with neem extract, you will have a good combination of knock down and residual effects. The permethrum will kill some beneficial insects too, but it breaks down in sunlight and has no residual, so the effect on beneficials is minimal, only those that are present during spraying.

I haven't tried to find it in Thailand, but I'm sure we can. I will ask at my chemical supplier for a trade name and Thai name the next time I go in. Not being strict on organic methods and tending toward the "least toxic" approach I prefer the synthetic pyrethroids for some cases because of increased effectiveness and residual effect. But I use those sparingly and for very specific spot treatments, it violates the strict organic code and would not be acceptible for organic farm certification, on the other hand Pyrethrum is acceptable.

mosquito coils not only for burning off and disperse the pest?

I tried as followed,there is a japanese company and makes said mosquito coils,not strictly organic,but also not poisened,or else the kids and you and the housecat would suffer badly from the sideeffects.Now we are talking,I immersed one coil in my feedwater for my cabbage and other garden crops, and Voila,no more pests.

Also I "spiked" a tomatoe with Severin and probably the word is out among the feathered friends DO NOT feed on the little red tomatoes,gets you indis..something.

The coils are made from Turmeric,Lemon grass extraxt and neemoil.

Can anybody tell me if I am wrong to do such a thing(I do and try many other remedies) as to dissolve a mosquitocoil as a pestcontroller.

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Hi RPVCguy

I did post a recipe I found for a bait to be used in this type of trap a couple of posts ago but have yet to try it. Is it similar to the bait that you use ? please can you share your recipe with us seeing that it has proved effective for you :) !!

cheers for now J

Jandtaa: I took the photo somewhat promptly, then never uploaded my response. My wife buys this and adds a few drops to a cotton ball suspended in an old plastic soda bottle. The bottle has a couple of flap door openings to allow the flies access, and she uses either soapy water (or now she prefers to use cooking oil) at the bottom of the bottle to trap them. the attractant isn't a recipe to copy - sorry, but it does work!

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Our quarter acre property manages to fit our home, some flower areas and enough veggie gardens to feed 6 of us most of the year... but it is an ongoing battle fought by my wife and daughters.

During the rainy season we get more snails and slugs than usual, but they seem to be controllable. Ants are the eternal issue.

Everyone stateside suggests I find and sprinkle diatomaceous earth onto damp foliage (so it sticks) and that it will kill off the ants that love our gardens.

1) Google translate just gives me ดินเบา (= lightweight dirt) and none of the farm supply shops seem to be helpful yet.

If anyone knows how to better define this in Thai, or has a photo of a bag of it I'd love to see it posted.

2) It works mechanically to dehydrate the ants, but how many helpful insects will also be affected? Does someone have experience with diatomacious earth

in an outdoor garden?

As it is, many birds, lizards and sometimes frogs help with the pest control of larger bugs, but these ants and aphids/ mealy flies are continually invading from our neighbors - who care not to maintain/ cultivate so much as harvesting whatever survives.

Just for visualization purposes I'm including some photos from "Peak" of the season moments :) My wife has taken to letting vine plants, (squash(?) = บวบ of several varieties) grow intertwined with the peppers to lessen wind and rain damage. Cucumbers = แตงกวา tend to be too heavy for the peppers, but love our papaya trees. We keep our yard cooler with many fast growing papaya trees - awaiting avocados and mangoes to grow. In the dry season we have more of the leafy salad greens... though the cycles are still adjusting since it was only 2 years ago that we had the raised beds done and mixed in many bags of cattle manure.

I'd love to hear what readers think, especially back to my initial questions as to diatomaceous earth.

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try these natural remedies

http://tilz.tearfund...nd+diseases.htm

I am about to brew up some vermi-tea from our worm casts. It is claimed that it both fertilises and pest controls as a foliage spray.

I am really keen to produce vermi-tea teabags. Simply take a bag and hang it in a bucket to brew, I believe an airpump adds to the microbe loading but many just brew without aeration. Anyway, I reckon there is a market out there for a Thai "No Think" easy to use foliant brew that both fertilises the leaves of vegetables and increases pest resistance. Why should Liptons have all the jiggling and dangling fun. Interested in opinions if anyone likes the idea.

For ant and coachroachs, boric acid has always been my mainstay.

However I am about to try rice hull ash.

Isaan Aussie

Edited by IsaanAussie

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try these natural remedies

http://tilz.tearfund...nd+diseases.htm

I am about to brew up some vermi-tea from our worm casts. It is claimed that it both fertilises and pest controls as a foliage spray.

I am really keen to produce vermi-tea teabags. Simply take a bag and hang it in a bucket to brew, I believe an airpump adds to the microbe loading but many just brew without aeration. Anyway, I reckon there is a market out there for a Thai "No Think" easy to use foliant brew that both fertilises the leaves of vegetables and increases pest resistance. Why should Liptons have all the jiggling and dangling fun. Interested in opinions if anyone likes the idea.

For ant and coachroachs, boric acid has always been my mainstay.

However I am about to try rice hull ash.

Isaan Aussie

This is interesting information IA, to have brewing/recipe directions. But I noticed that the Pyrethrum recipe didn't state that it is Crysanthemum extract. And there is no recommendation on frequency of applications for any of these. I might add another caution to this: "Red chilli peppers Chop up a cup of red chilli peppers. (Be really careful not to rub your eyes!)" Or private parts when taking a leak.

I would be very interested to know more of members direct experiences/case histories of using botanicals and compost extracts for practical pest control, and what kind of results were achieved against which pests, and what application frequency was used.

You may have posted before, but please tell me again how you mix and use boric acid, and what kind of shop you buy it at.

Edited by drtreelove

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try these natural remedies

http://tilz.tearfund...nd+diseases.htm

I am about to brew up some vermi-tea from our worm casts. It is claimed that it both fertilises and pest controls as a foliage spray.

I am really keen to produce vermi-tea teabags. Simply take a bag and hang it in a bucket to brew, I believe an airpump adds to the microbe loading but many just brew without aeration. Anyway, I reckon there is a market out there for a Thai "No Think" easy to use foliant brew that both fertilises the leaves of vegetables and increases pest resistance. Why should Liptons have all the jiggling and dangling fun. Interested in opinions if anyone likes the idea.

For ant and coachroachs, boric acid has always been my mainstay.

However I am about to try rice hull ash.

Isaan Aussie

This is interesting information IA, to have brewing/recipe directions. But I noticed that the Pyrethrum recipe didn't state that it is Crysanthemum extract. And there is no recommendation on frequency of applications for any of these. I might add another caution to this: "Red chilli peppers Chop up a cup of red chilli peppers. (Be really careful not to rub your eyes!)" Or private parts when taking a leak.

I would be very interested to know more of members direct experiences/case histories of using botanicals and compost extracts for practical pest control, and what kind of results were achieved against which pests, and what application frequency was used.

You may have posted before, but please tell me again how you mix and use boric acid, and what kind of shop you buy it at.

Dr TL,

Sorry but can't help much. I will offer one piece of advice to add to your chili on the genitalia warning. Boric Acid kills coachroaches so it probably isnt to good for us.

Back in Australia there were a number of insectide powders for killing ants, from memory the one I used was called Borax. Here I have seen many household cleaning products that contain enough BA which could be used to formulate an ant killer as described below. I havent tried to buy boric acid here but a quick web search tells me there are a number of chemical companies here who could supply it. All else fails check out the contents of household cleaning products in Tescos, add sugar and water and see what happens.

Here I have used a Thai product sold by pickup truck shops here in the mobahn, God knows what is in it but the labelling in English was funny, something like "He take powder back home kill everybody" But the stuff worked.

The treatment mix that I have for ants is:

This homemade treatment has worked very well on ants.

Ingredients:

1 Tablespoon of Boric Acid, 1 tsp of Sugar, 4 oz water, Cotton Balls.

Mix Boric Acid and Sugar in a bowl. This can be poured over a cotton wad in a small dish or bottle cap. Keep this from drying out for continued effectiveness. Place Cotton balls in path of Ants.

I suppose you could scale that up.

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