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BANGKOK 18 July 2019 15:43
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ForestGardener

Agricultural Permaculture / Forest Gardening

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Fascinating post, I'm very interested with the outcome of your project, and the richness of info coming along.

To take a break from all the technical data being brought up from the shelves, I'd like to repeat what a friend just recently told me :

Around Chantanaburi, there is at least one such 'fruit garden'. People pay a cover charge of 200B, and then can eat as much as they can enjoy ! My friend told me the place is huge, they even have a golf cart to help you visit the place, and every body wa shaving a lot of fun.

I don't know wether this is the kind of place you have in mind.

This is a great idea for farmers who want to diversify their income, and may be couple that with homestay.

As a landscape architect, I am personnaly very interested into that idea, and will be going on a short investigation trip over there shortly (I love investigating fresh fruits ! ^^). May be this week-end.

++ ^^

Hi sunsamourai

That place sounds intresting. I tried to google on internet but find only Horticultural Research Centre.

Do you think that could be the place?

Horticultural Research Centre (ศูนย์วิจัยพืชสวน) located on Sukhumwit Road in Tambon Tapon, Amphoe Khlung, 21 Kilometres from Chanthaburi, covering a total area of 280 rai. The centre is responsible for horticultural research in order to solve the problems as well as develop major economic plants in the Central Region and the East. There are experimental plantations of various horticultural plants such as durian, rambutan, mangosteen, zalacca, santol as well as decorative plants, herbs and spices. A 30-minute study trail is provided through gardens and plantations. A camping ground is also allocated for visitors, with tents for 1–3 persons available at Baht 100–200. Contact at least 1 week in advance for a group visit. Tel. 0 3939 7030, 0 3939 7146 during office hours on weekdays.

I hope you go for a short investigation trip. Take some photos and get back with a report.

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Try googling "Leucaena", Thai name Kratin.

Its a legume tree.

Very common in Thailand.

Edible young seeds.

I grows very fast on almost any soil.

Will create shade for other plants that need it.

The leaves make good green manure & livestock feed.

Can be cut frequently.

Vetiver Grass, Thai Ya Fek.

Great for planting along the edges of your ditches to stabalise banks & control runoff.

Produces huge amounts of grass blades for mulch.

In my experience it likes full sun,

Some of mine under trees has nearly died, a few yards away its huge.

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There's a newsletter from the FAO called Non Wood Forest Products Digest- the website address is below.

A few articles in recent publications have discussed the Acai fruit which seems to have potential but I haven't seen any evidence that it's been grown in Thailand with success.

http://www.fao.org/forestry/49935/en/

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Hi fellow forest gardener,

The Upland Holistic Development Project has been experimenting and promoting a form of complex agroforestry in northern Thailand for more than ten years. They have a very good list of appropriate species, some of which should work in Ubon.

We've been trying some of this out north of Chiang Mai for a couple of years, with some success. We plant things that might bear harvest in 40 years (Asian redwood, etc.), things that yield in a year (cassava, taro, papaya), and everything in between.

You'll have to google these things, because I'm "not allowed to post a url" for some reason.

UHDP

Fair Earth Co. (look at the farm page)

Good luck!

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Hi fellow forest gardener,

You'll have to google these things, because I'm "not allowed to post a url" for some reason. ???

UHDP

Fair Earth Co. (look at the farm page)

Good luck!

:o Put the URL in your profile. :D

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bergen,what do you grow in your garden and where are you located at in ubon.

Take a look at my profile, and you will find our website, with information and maps :o

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Organic Farming Techniques

The principals that I have used over 25 od years of practice in a Sub tropical rainforest area

Only grow things that are native or proven suitable to the local area

Do not grow only single species

Do not worry what the fruit or veg looks like, only the taste is important, a few holes in the leaves or spots on the fruit are a good sign for an organic farmer (just saw another post, ("If the insects won't eat it certainly is no good for man")

Do not grow trees of the same species together

Companion plant

Only use organic fertilizers and natural herbicides and grow plants that protect others from insects

Do not grow things that will be attacked by local animals. (Not so much a problem in Thailand as most of the original native animals have been killed and eaten)

Mulch heavily around plants to develop environments for micro-organisms and retain moisture and to feed the plants. First with cardboard then on top straw, cow grass, rice storks or similar, in the case of tress, mulch to the drip line being careful to leave a space around the trunk to avoid bark rot during the wet season

Use swales for water harvesting

Use raised beds between swales to help develop healthy root systems and prevent rot and disease

Always plant three (at least) of everything, not necessarily in the same place. One for the animals to eat, one for you to eat and one that will not flourish.

Plant only when the cycle of the moon is suitable for the particular kind on plant

Use domestic farm animals for weed control and supply of fertiliser

Have soil tested by a reputable chemist to assertain if any deficiencies exist or any special structure indicates its suitability for particular species

Use drip feed irrigation system

If anyone would like an explaination of any of the above points, would be happy to expand

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moved to farming section

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moved to farming section

i did do a search to find somewhere to post but the search did not turn up anything suitable

sorry! :o

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moved to farming section

i did do a search to find somewhere to post but the search did not turn up anything suitable

sorry! :D

Not a problem YD !! You are now in the ideal location !! Welcome  :o !

All good points in your post. As you will see there's a wide range of topics being discussed and your input is most welcome . Do I assume from the fact that you refer to moon cycles that you are using bio-dynamic farming methods maybe you could tell us more ??

cheers Jandtaa 

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moved to farming section

i did do a search to find somewhere to post but the search did not turn up anything suitable

sorry! :D

Not a problem YD !! You are now in the ideal location !! Welcome  :o !

All good points in your post. As you will see there's a wide range of topics being discussed and your input is most welcome . Do I assume from the fact that you refer to moon cycles that you are using bio-dynamic farming methods maybe you could tell us more ??

cheers Jandtaa 

The moon phase planting comes from Permaculture Methods for more information check out either ot the following links or google "Planting by moon phases"

http://www.mymoonlife.com/rwhtml/rwhtml/moon_phases.html

http://www.plantea.com/planting-moon-phases.htm

i can assure you that it works. Always had a better result with stronger seedlings and more produce

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Companion plant

This is something that interests me. Can you suggest companions (guilds? Is that the right word?) for things we might plant in Thailand?

Always plant three (at least) of everything, not necessarily in the same place. One for the animals to eat, one for you to eat and one that will not flourish.

Ha! I like that.

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